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Rebecca Twigg

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SPORTS
August 18, 1996 | From Associated Press
Cyclist Rebecca Twigg, who quit the Olympics five days before what was supposed to be her crowning race, blames her U.S. Cycling coaches for the fiasco in Atlanta. "I think some of their egos got in the way of letting an athlete tell them what's best," Twigg told the Seattle Times in her first public statement since leaving Atlanta on July 29. "They wanted to be in charge. Their say-so was going to be final, whether it was for the best or not."
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SPORTS
August 18, 1996 | From Associated Press
Cyclist Rebecca Twigg, who quit the Olympics five days before what was supposed to be her crowning race, blames her U.S. Cycling coaches for the fiasco in Atlanta. "I think some of their egos got in the way of letting an athlete tell them what's best," Twigg told the Seattle Times in her first public statement since leaving Atlanta on July 29. "They wanted to be in charge. Their say-so was going to be final, whether it was for the best or not."
SPORTS
August 1, 1992 | Staff and Wire Reports
Rebecca Twigg's improbable comeback continued Friday at the Municipal Velodrome with a bronze medal in the women's 3,000-meter pursuit. Twigg of San Diego won the silver medal in the first women's road race in 1984, failed to make the U.S. team in 1988 and retired shortly thereafter. She started training at the end of last year when the urge to return overcame her. "On nice summer days I'd think about cycling again," Twigg said earlier this year.
SPORTS
August 1, 1992 | Staff and Wire Reports
Rebecca Twigg's improbable comeback continued Friday at the Municipal Velodrome with a bronze medal in the women's 3,000-meter pursuit. Twigg of San Diego won the silver medal in the first women's road race in 1984, failed to make the U.S. team in 1988 and retired shortly thereafter. She started training at the end of last year when the urge to return overcame her. "On nice summer days I'd think about cycling again," Twigg said earlier this year.
SPORTS
August 16, 1988 | JERRY CROWE, Times Staff Writer
Rebecca Twigg, her energy sapped by a season wracked with illness, could do little more than spin her wheels at the U.S. Olympic women's cycling road racing trials earlier this month at Spokane, Wash. Twigg, a 14-time national champion, couldn't spin them fast enough to qualify for the Olympics next month at Seoul, South Korea. In fact, she was unable to finish among the top 60 in any of the three races that made up the U.S. trials.
NEWS
July 28, 1985 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
The American cycling euphoria of '84, brought on by European-sized crowds who watched as United States riders reaped an unprecedented Olympic harvest, has cooled somewhat in the year that followed. Nine medals, four of them gold, were the first won by the United States since 1912. However, five of the medal winners, including individual pursuit champion Steve Hegg of Dana Point, later were revealed to have participated in a practice called "blood doping." The incident, which more correctly should be called "blood packing," was more of an embarrassment than anything else.
SPORTS
June 17, 1992 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebecca Twigg never saw it coming. She was out of the bicycle seat, her long, strong legs pedaling feverishly, when her rear wheel suddenly came apart. She flipped over the bike, landed on her head, suffering a mild concussion and a broken thumb. The accident during practice the day before the start of the 1987 season didn't end her career as one of the greatest female bicycle racers, but it did leave an indelible mark.
SPORTS
December 24, 1987
Rebecca Twigg of Seattle and Kent Bostick of Corrales, N.M., were named cyclists of the year by the U.S. Cycling Federation.
SPORTS
June 17, 1992 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebecca Twigg never saw it coming. She was out of the bicycle seat, her long, strong legs pedaling feverishly, when her rear wheel suddenly came apart. She flipped over the bike, landed on her head, suffering a mild concussion and a broken thumb. The accident during practice the day before the start of the 1987 season didn't end her career as one of the greatest female bicycle racers, but it did leave an indelible mark.
SPORTS
August 16, 1988 | JERRY CROWE, Times Staff Writer
Rebecca Twigg, her energy sapped by a season wracked with illness, could do little more than spin her wheels at the U.S. Olympic women's cycling road racing trials earlier this month at Spokane, Wash. Twigg, a 14-time national champion, couldn't spin them fast enough to qualify for the Olympics next month at Seoul, South Korea. In fact, she was unable to finish among the top 60 in any of the three races that made up the U.S. trials.
NEWS
July 28, 1985 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
The American cycling euphoria of '84, brought on by European-sized crowds who watched as United States riders reaped an unprecedented Olympic harvest, has cooled somewhat in the year that followed. Nine medals, four of them gold, were the first won by the United States since 1912. However, five of the medal winners, including individual pursuit champion Steve Hegg of Dana Point, later were revealed to have participated in a practice called "blood doping." The incident, which more correctly should be called "blood packing," was more of an embarrassment than anything else.
SPORTS
March 11, 1993 | From Associated Press
The ninth annual Redlands Bicycle Classic begins today with the professional time trials on Greenspot Road in Highland. Among those expected to take part in the four-day, five-stage event are Rebecca Twigg, a 1992 Olympic bronze medalist and 1984 Olympic silver medalist; Sally Zack, a two-time Olympian; Marianne Berglund, a former world road champion, and Bart Bowen, 1992 U.S. Pro champion.
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