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Rebecca Walker

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
A bisexual, biracial Yale grad goes to Africa and falls in love with a Kenyan Muslim. That's the premise of "Ade: A Love Story," the novel by Rebecca Walker that Madonna plans to make into a film. Deadline reports that Madonna plans to direct and has lined up Oscar-winning producer Bruce Cohen; a screenwriter has not yet been attached. "Ade" is Walker's first novel. The daughter of Alice Walker is the author of the acclaimed memoirs "Black White and Jewish: Autobiography of a Shifting Self" and "Baby Love: Choosing Motherhood After a Lifetime of Ambivalence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
Fiction writers discussed what it means to write novels about characters and cultures with specific ethnic identities, while also debating who is able to tell those stories, in a panel called "Fiction: Writing Culture and Character" at the Festival of Books on Sunday.  Rebecca Walker has written several memoirs, including "Black, White and Jewish," but wrote her first novel last year, about an American who goes to to Africa. Walker said she paid attention to, and made sure not to fall into, the tropes of the noble savage and the privileged American in telling a story that was both "true and subversive.
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NEWS
December 6, 1995 | MERI NANA-AMA DANQUAH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You'll forgive Rebecca Walker for taking it personally back in 1992 when the popular wisdom held that the younger generation had turned its back on feminism. Walker--a 22-year-old Yale student, a contributing editor to Ms. magazine and goddaughter to Gloria Steinem, no less--begged to differ. The idea disturbed her so much, particularly after the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas hearings, that she wrote an article for Ms., proclaiming that "I am not a post-feminism feminist. I am the Third Wave."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
A bisexual, biracial Yale grad goes to Africa and falls in love with a Kenyan Muslim. That's the premise of "Ade: A Love Story," the novel by Rebecca Walker that Madonna plans to make into a film. Deadline reports that Madonna plans to direct and has lined up Oscar-winning producer Bruce Cohen; a screenwriter has not yet been attached. "Ade" is Walker's first novel. The daughter of Alice Walker is the author of the acclaimed memoirs "Black White and Jewish: Autobiography of a Shifting Self" and "Baby Love: Choosing Motherhood After a Lifetime of Ambivalence.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Margaret Wappler
The Revolution of Every Day A Novel Cari Luna Tin House: 392 pp., $15.95 paper Much has been written recently about the impossibility of a middle-class existence in New York. Cari Luna sets her sights on an even more beleaguered socio-economic group with her excellent debut novel, "The Revolution of Every Day," which looks at squatter culture in the mid-'90s, when a tenement house in Manhattan's East Village could be seized by idealistic rebels. At Thirteen House, one of a clique of interconnected squats, a young runaway named Amelia is pregnant, but not by Gerrit, her Dutch boyfriend with a savior complex (he helped her kick heroin)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
Fiction writers discussed what it means to write novels about characters and cultures with specific ethnic identities, while also debating who is able to tell those stories, in a panel called "Fiction: Writing Culture and Character" at the Festival of Books on Sunday.  Rebecca Walker has written several memoirs, including "Black, White and Jewish," but wrote her first novel last year, about an American who goes to to Africa. Walker said she paid attention to, and made sure not to fall into, the tropes of the noble savage and the privileged American in telling a story that was both "true and subversive.
HEALTH
November 10, 2012 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie
Few things could be less cool than conducting a scientific study on what it means to be cool, but that didn't stop a group of researchers from facing the question down anyway. Their study, "Coolness: An Empirical Investigation," developed from what sounds like a barroom debate. "One day, a friend of mine was trying to figure out if Steve Buscemi was cool," said Ilan Dar-Nimrod, an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York. "We couldn't seem to agree, so being the social scientist geeks that we are, we decided to take it upon ourselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The winners of the 2014 Anisfield-Wolf awards were announced Wednesday with prizes of $10,000 each. Since 1935, the Anisfield-Wolf awards have been presented to books and authors who confront racism and explore diversity. The Lifetime Achievement award will be shared by Wilson Harris and George Lamming, who will  split the $10,000 prize. Harris, who turned 93 this week, was born in Guyana and now lives in England. He has published more than two dozen novels. Lamming was born in Barbados and was a novelist and cultural critic who lived abroad for many years; his teaching appointments included a stint at Brown University.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2001
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized examinations. Here are home-viewing tips: * Today--"David Hockney: Pleasures of the Eye" (OVTN 7-7:30 p.m., repeats 11:30 p.m.-midnight) Profiles the modern British artist known for his depictions of California. * Friday--"Titus" (CMAX, 7-10 p.m.) Movie based on the Shakespeare play "Titus Andronicus," about a ruthless Roman general's struggle for political power.
MAGAZINE
August 8, 1993 | BARRY SIEGEL, Barry Seigel, a Times national correspondent, is the author of "Death in White Bear Lake" and "Shades of Gray," both published by Bantam Books. His last story for this magazine was about the University of Wisconsin's effort to outlaw hate speech
WHEN FBI AGENT JON LIPSKY PROPOSED IN JUNE, 1988, THAT they "do Rocky Flats," Assistant U.S. Atty. Ken Fimberg gave him the type of look you'd direct at someone who'd just said something intriguing but utterly wacky. Lipsky was neither surprised nor offended, for he more or less shared this response. They were sitting in Fimberg's office in the federal courthouse building in downtown Denver. With them was William Smith, an Environmental Protection Agency investigator.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Margaret Wappler
The Revolution of Every Day A Novel Cari Luna Tin House: 392 pp., $15.95 paper Much has been written recently about the impossibility of a middle-class existence in New York. Cari Luna sets her sights on an even more beleaguered socio-economic group with her excellent debut novel, "The Revolution of Every Day," which looks at squatter culture in the mid-'90s, when a tenement house in Manhattan's East Village could be seized by idealistic rebels. At Thirteen House, one of a clique of interconnected squats, a young runaway named Amelia is pregnant, but not by Gerrit, her Dutch boyfriend with a savior complex (he helped her kick heroin)
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | MERI NANA-AMA DANQUAH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You'll forgive Rebecca Walker for taking it personally back in 1992 when the popular wisdom held that the younger generation had turned its back on feminism. Walker--a 22-year-old Yale student, a contributing editor to Ms. magazine and goddaughter to Gloria Steinem, no less--begged to differ. The idea disturbed her so much, particularly after the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas hearings, that she wrote an article for Ms., proclaiming that "I am not a post-feminism feminist. I am the Third Wave."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1994 | RUTH ROSEN, Ruth Rosen, a professor of history at UC Davis, is writing a history of contemporary feminism titled "The Second Wave."
Be prepared for the gender wars to last well into the next century. Two recent news stories suggest that teen-age girls and boys--far from moving toward a peaceful truce--are rapidly headed on a collision course. While teen-age boys dream of replicating the much mythologized traditional family of the 1950s, replete with male breadwinner and stay-at-home housewife, teen-age girls are busy reinventing feminism and preparing to support themselves and their children.
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