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NEWS
October 23, 2000 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victoria Leung is a master of the unspoken word, the not-so-innocent question, the sympathetic smile. She knows the danger of saying too much. Leung knows she has only a few moments to sell herself--to tell a potential client that she works for a firm called Rebound; that she can help his company get rid of its unwanted goods; that his problems are her own. What she doesn't mention upfront is that Rebound, an online auction site, relies on the Internet.
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BUSINESS
August 31, 2009 | Ben Fritz
Viacom Inc. and the video game industry are hoping they'll get more than a little help from the Beatles. When the Beatles: Rock Band hits stores Sept. 9, Viacom is betting that the new title from its MTV unit will end a slump in the market and vindicate the company's expensive and unprofitable entry into the music video game business over the last two years. The new game applies the simulated rock star experience that many are familiar with from other Rock Band games and Activision Blizzard Inc.'s Guitar Hero and brings in the Beatles, who have never before appeared in a video game.
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BUSINESS
December 24, 2002 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Basketball star Michael Jordan resigned Monday as a director of Oakley Inc., the maker of avant-garde sunglasses that's having its own troubles getting the ball through the hoop. Jordan, who endorses Oakley's eyewear, said he quit because of demands on his time and his desire to help Oakley increase the independence of its six-member board, as proposed by new government and market regulations.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2002 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Basketball star Michael Jordan resigned Monday as a director of Oakley Inc., the maker of avant-garde sunglasses that's having its own troubles getting the ball through the hoop. Jordan, who endorses Oakley's eyewear, said he quit because of demands on his time and his desire to help Oakley increase the independence of its six-member board, as proposed by new government and market regulations.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2009 | Ben Fritz
Viacom Inc. and the video game industry are hoping they'll get more than a little help from the Beatles. When the Beatles: Rock Band hits stores Sept. 9, Viacom is betting that the new title from its MTV unit will end a slump in the market and vindicate the company's expensive and unprofitable entry into the music video game business over the last two years. The new game applies the simulated rock star experience that many are familiar with from other Rock Band games and Activision Blizzard Inc.'s Guitar Hero and brings in the Beatles, who have never before appeared in a video game.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
HomeBase Inc., caving in to home-improvement giants Home Depot Inc. and Lowe's Cos., said Tuesday that it will bail out of the home-improvement sector entirely, closing 22 stores and converting 62 others into home furnishings businesses. The Irvine company will stake its future on its House2Home stores, noting that five of these test home furnishing sites generated strong sales in their first 12 weeks.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2001 | DIANE WEDNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homestore.com Inc., the Internet's largest supplier of home-sale listings, announced Thursday that it is slashing as many as 700 jobs, or about 20% of its work force. The 4-year-old Westlake Village company said its third-quarter results are expected to fall below analysts' estimates because of a drop in advertising sales. The company's shares are down 69% for the year.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1990 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cherokee Inc., citing the stock market's severe slump, said it scrapped plans to go public with a $40-million-plus stock offering. The decision was not a surprise. Cherokee, a privately owned Sunland apparel maker that specializes in women's sports clothing, had said last month that unless the market enjoyed a quick rebound, the company would probably cancel its offering. Many companies, in fact, have been forced to withdraw or postpone initial public offerings because of the market's slide.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1991 | From Reuters
Pan Am Corp., which filed for bankruptcy protection in January, said in a document released Tuesday that tough competition from rival airlines could force it out of business as early as this year. "The company has no available credit facilities and substantially all of Pan Am's remaining assets are encumbered," the 64-year-old airline said in a quarterly filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
AUTOS
March 6, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. In a move to give more autonomy to the regions where Toyota Motor Corp. sells cars and bring a new generation of leadership to the company's top management, the automaker announced sweeping executive changes Wednesday. Among the moves, Toyota appointed the engineer who developed the successful Prius hybrid as chairman of the company and named its first outsider, and first former General Motors executive, to its board of directors.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victoria Leung is a master of the unspoken word, the not-so-innocent question, the sympathetic smile. She knows the danger of saying too much. Leung knows she has only a few moments to sell herself--to tell a potential client that she works for a firm called Rebound; that she can help his company get rid of its unwanted goods; that his problems are her own. What she doesn't mention upfront is that Rebound, an online auction site, relies on the Internet.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2004 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
Five state pension funds said Thursday that they would join a growing chorus of investors opposing Michael Eisner's reelection as chairman of Walt Disney Co., and New York's comptroller called for Eisner's immediate removal. Faced with the mounting backlash, the entertainment giant is braced to see Eisner lose as much as 30% of the shareholder votes at Wednesday's annual meeting in Philadelphia, a source close to the company said.
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