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Rebuild Crenshaw

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1992 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just shy of the intersection of Crenshaw and Martin Luther King boulevards stands a monument to community activism, a concrete reminder of what the power of people can accomplish with a modicum of organization. Its gleaming white facade rises out of the gray asphalt, a beacon of pride to the thousands of mostly African-American residents who pass through the riot-ravaged neighborhood each day. But what they like best are its competitive prices on toilet paper and top sirloin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1992 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just shy of the intersection of Crenshaw and Martin Luther King boulevards stands a monument to community activism, a concrete reminder of what the power of people can accomplish with a modicum of organization. Its gleaming white facade rises out of the gray asphalt, a beacon of pride to the thousands of mostly African-American residents who pass through the riot-ravaged neighborhood each day. But what they like best are its competitive prices on toilet paper and top sirloin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1992
A group of community and business leaders from the Crenshaw area have announced plans to form a "Rebuild Crenshaw" committee, which they said could work in conjunction with the Rebuild L.A. task force headed by Peter Ueberroth. "One of the deep frustrations that sparked the riots was the lack of community control over its economic destiny," said Councilwoman Ruth Galanter, whose staff will work with the committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1992
A group of community and business leaders from the Crenshaw area have announced plans to form a "Rebuild Crenshaw" committee, which they said could work in conjunction with the Rebuild L.A. task force headed by Peter Ueberroth. "One of the deep frustrations that sparked the riots was the lack of community control over its economic destiny," said Councilwoman Ruth Galanter, whose staff will work with the committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1985 | RAY HEBERT, Times Urban Affairs Writer and
The sprawling Crenshaw Shopping Center has become the focus of a full-blown geological investigation--sparked by earthquake legislation--to pinpoint possible ground faults that could kill or drastically alter a planned $100-million rebuilding of the aging complex in Southwest Los Angeles.
OPINION
November 15, 1992
Easton's article captured the spirit of the Crenshaw community. It presented a clear picture of a community of people with diverse means and needs, yet possessing many strengths in the face of economic and social challenges. It is these strengths that Rebuild Crenshaw is channeling into specific subcommittees, such as business, finance, youth and community development corporations, to name a few. These groups are working to restore Crenshaw to the social and economic viability its residents deserve.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | ERIN J. AUBRY
At Crenshaw and Adams boulevards stands a gutted Unocal station. About half a mile south, at Slauson Avenue, the Crenshaw Town Centre is a blackened hulk; only The Boys market and Pete's Haven Burgers remain open in what was once a sprawling, bustling mini-mall. Yet even as burned-out businesses await their fate along Crenshaw, a grass-roots group already has bigger plans. The Rebuild Crenshaw Committee wants to see the area made better than it was before the April-May riots.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
More affordable housing, youth centers and retail and office buildings are all part of the wish list in a plan drafted by the Crenshaw Cluster to promote economic development in the Crenshaw district. In a meeting last week, the Cluster, a consortium of five resident-based planning groups, reviewed a land-use plan designed to improve the quality of life there. "The plan is unique in that it's been entirely citizen-directed," said Valerie Shaw, the plan's administrator. "It's also very specific.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
During a city-sponsored workshop on the future of Southwest Los Angeles, participants from the 8th District were told that their suggestions for improving the area may become part of the city's development plans. The city has been conducting the post-riot workshops the last three months, seeking advice about how to improve the neighborhoods bounded by the Santa Monica Freeway to the north, the city limit to the south, La Cienega Boulevard to the west and Arlington Avenue to the east.
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | JOHN MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter announced the formation of a Crenshaw-area group to coordinate community efforts to restore areas devastated in the recent riots. The Rebuild Crenshaw Committee, composed of community-based businesses and organizations, will lobby to bring needed resources into the area, said Galanter, who spoke Thursday at a news conference in front of the charred remains of a Wherehouse record store.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1985 | RAY HEBERT, Times Urban Affairs Writer and
The sprawling Crenshaw Shopping Center has become the focus of a full-blown geological investigation--sparked by earthquake legislation--to pinpoint possible ground faults that could kill or drastically alter a planned $100-million rebuilding of the aging complex in Southwest Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A special state Senate committee that investigated conditions underlying the Los Angeles riots recommends establishing a statewide Economic Development Financing Authority to issue bonds and facilitate development activities in the city's impoverished communities, according to a report scheduled for release today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LeRoy Simon is one of those philosophers who doubles as a barber. For 32 years now he's worked the insides and outsides of people's heads at his shop on South Broadway--long enough to remember when the street didn't suffer so much from blight, poverty and crime; long enough to develop a rich skepticism for slick-talking politicians and plate-passing preachers who've come and gone or, worse, stayed.
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