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Rebuild L A

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1996
Seventeen agencies and schools have applied to be the heirs of Rebuild L.A., the economic development organization created after the 1992 riots that is supposed to cease operations next spring. RLA leaders this week began reviewing applications to inherit the group's estimated $200,000 in cash, databases and programs aimed at boosting retail and manufacturing businesses in low-income neighborhoods in Los Angeles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc, Los Angeles Times
From rubble and wreckage, Ki Suh Park often saw possibility. It was so as he stood amid the destruction of the Korean War, when he resolved to study architecture and help rebuild his homeland. And it was so as he drove down Western Avenue after the 1992 Los Angeles riots, when he vowed to help rebuild a community after the violence that wracked his adopted home. Park, an architect who rose to become a leader in the city's Korean American community, died Jan. 16 at Stanford University Medical Center after a four-year battle with pancreatic cancer, his family said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1992
After announcing the appointment of Tony M. Salazar as Rebuild L.A.'s fourth chairman, Peter V. Ueberroth said that the organization now is looking for an Asian-American and a woman to join its top management. Currently, Rebuild L.A. has four co-chairmen--two Anglos, one black and one Latino. Ueberroth said in an interview that he had met recently with three of Rebuild L.A.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
They had names like Rebuild L.A., Community Coalition, the Koreatown Immigrant Workers Alliance. Their goals were nearly identical: provide new jobs and services to an underserved community. Improve neighborhoods. Build better relationships. The aftermath of the 1992 riots was a galvanizing moment for community activism, spawning groups formed out of City Hall, churches and local nonprofits. Some have endured over the last two decades, shifting their priorities as the city changed.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1992 | GEORGE WHITE
City officials, Rebuild L.A. Chairman Peter Ueberroth and executives and employees of Broadway Federal Savings gathered Wednesday to celebrate the opening of a new Broadway office that replaces a branch destroyed during the Los Angeles riots. Use of the 3,600-square-foot modular office building was donated by Irwindale-based Home Savings of America. The new office, one of three operated by the black-owned thrift, is located at 4429 S. Broadway.
NEWS
January 28, 1993
Tony M. Salazar, who has taken over as the fourth co-chairman of the Rebuild L.A. effort, says conditions in Los Angeles are formidable in the wake of last year's rioting. "This is a very tense city," Salazar said, after being chosen for the position last month. "There is tension between the public sector and the private sector, among community groups, blacks and Latinos. . . . Everyone has to hold hands and get in the boat together. Only by doing that will we make change in this town."
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than one-fourth of the companies that Rebuild L.A. has identified as being among those intending to invest heavily in Los Angeles' inner city have no such plans, company officials told The Times. Officials of some of the companies named by Rebuild L.A.--from consumer products giant Quaker Oats to Dow Chemical--said they are mystified as to why they are on a list of 68 companies released by Rebuild L.A. at its board meeting late last month. At that time, Co-Chairman Peter V.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Rebuild L.A.'s second board meeting recently, Los Angeles School Board President Leticia Quezada urged the organization to take a stand against a possible teachers strike. Her emotional request added yet another potentially thorny issue to Rebuild L.A.'s full plate--one already laden with pleas that it bring jobs back to the inner city, end redlining by banks and insurance companies, speed the rebuilding of burned-out stores and ease the city's racial tensions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unless the nation's corporations reverse the trend, "the cancer of disinvestment" in the nation's inner cities "will eventually eat America alive," one of Rebuild L.A.'s co-chairmen said Tuesday while estimating that last spring's riots have cost Southern California's economy $20 billion. During a speech at the Biltmore Hotel, Bernard W. Kinsey said the situation is much more dire than after the 1965 Watts riots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several hundred low-wage janitors protested at Rebuild L.A. headquarters Thursday, demanding that the organization start focusing on improving working conditions for "the hundreds of thousands of workers in the city who live in poverty despite working full-time jobs." The noisy but peaceful protest on West 8th Place downtown was spawned by remarks made by Rebuild L.A. Co-chairman Peter V. Ueberroth last month during a news conference announcing the launching of a job training program by Toyota.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2005 | Emma Vaughn and Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writers
President Bush, fresh from his fourth visit to the Gulf Coast, told an audience at the National Cathedral on Friday that he would use the rebuilding process to correct the poverty born of racial discrimination that left so many of Hurricane Katrina's victims vulnerable. "The greatest hardship fell upon citizens already facing lives of struggle: the elderly, the vulnerable and the poor," he said.
REAL ESTATE
February 1, 2004 | Allison B. Cohen, Special to The Times
Southern California jurisdictions are assisting homeowners hit by the fires of late October in the rebuilding process by waiving or seeking reimbursement of building permit fees. The counties of Riverside, Ventura, San Diego and, most recently, San Bernardino have opted to waive the fees, which can amount to thousands of dollars and cover charges such as application and inspection costs. Los Angeles County is exploring a fee-reimbursement plan.
OPINION
February 27, 2000 | RONALD D. WHITE
The Los Angeles Community Development Bank was a belated federal response to the 1992 Los Angeles riots. This isn't just any federal assistance program. It's the largest-ever federal funding commitment to a bank with a high-risk clientele. The bank has a double duty: making loans and creating jobs. The bank's loans to struggling businesses are backed by the city's future federal community-development block grants, which might be lost should the bank be unable to repay the federal government.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing on the porch with her grandchildren, Helen Johnson watched with despair as her South-Central Los Angeles neighborhood burst into flames April 29, 1992. But within a few months of the riots, she saw a glimmer of hope. Corporations she had never seen in her part of the world came with the thunder of a cavalry, promising to invest hundreds of millions of dollars to revitalize riot-stricken and neglected areas of Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Few people understand Southern California's new economy of small companies, diverse neighborhoods and surprising skills as well as Linda Griego. When she became president of RLA--formerly Rebuild LA--in 1994, efforts to get big companies to create jobs in poor, riot-torn neighborhoods had already proved a major disappointment. It was a somber time full of doubts about the local economy's future and hand wringing about the fading of traditional business leadership that persists to this day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of RLA on Wednesday chose the nine-campus Los Angeles Community College District to inherit the assets of the private agency that was formed to help the region economically recover from the 1992 riots but never fulfilled its early promises. RLA's databases and about $200,000 in cash will be given to a new arm of the college district by January, according to agency President Linda Griego. RLA, formerly known as Rebuild L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1993
In the first major post-riot relief for the San Fernando Valley, Rebuild L.A. is channeling $70,000 worth of supplies donated by the lumber industry to help build eight Pacoima townhouses for poor families. The donation will enable Habitat for Humanity--a nonprofit international group whose most famous volunteer is former President Jimmy Carter--to complete its low-income condominium project, which depends largely on volunteer labor and gifts of building materials, Habitat executives said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1993
A dozen inner-city projects--ranging from a center to train entrepreneurs to a newsletter that would list job openings--were promised financial backing from Arco on Thursday as the corporation pledged another $7 million to the effort to rebuild Los Angeles. The projects are intended to create jobs, develop small businesses and revitalize the neediest areas of the city, said Arco Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Lodwrick M. Cook. The donation brings the company's Rebuild L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1996
Seventeen agencies and schools have applied to be the heirs of Rebuild L.A., the economic development organization created after the 1992 riots that is supposed to cease operations next spring. RLA leaders this week began reviewing applications to inherit the group's estimated $200,000 in cash, databases and programs aimed at boosting retail and manufacturing businesses in low-income neighborhoods in Los Angeles.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
RLA, the private agency that served as the city's main response to the deadly 1992 riots, is now preparing for its own demise, offering to give away its assets amid lingering questions about its legacy. The nonprofit economic development organization, originally known as Rebuild L.A., was mandated at birth to go out of business five years after the civil disturbances that spurred its creation.
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