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Rechargeable Batteries

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BUSINESS
March 25, 2002 | Associated Press
Rayovac Corp. said it has developed a new rechargeable battery that will take only 15 minutes to recharge. The technology will cut recharging time from one hour for its most powerful rechargeable batteries, designed for high-drain devices such as digital cameras, the Madison, Wis.-based battery maker said.
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BUSINESS
February 15, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
After ongoing lithium-ion battery problems grounded the worldwide fleet of Boeing Co.'s 787 Dreamliners, European rival Airbus has scrapped plans to use the technology on its new jet. The A350 XWB wide-body passenger jets will instead use “the proven and mastered” nickel cadmium main batteries, the company said Friday. “Airbus considers this to be the most appropriate way forward in the interest of program execution and A350 XWB reliability,” the company said. The A350 XWB, set to enter service in 2014, seats 270 to 350 passengers in typical three-class layouts.
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NEWS
June 7, 1990 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG
Rechargeable batteries could have saved everybody a bunch of trouble. When the batteries in my daughter's Walkman died during a long trip, well, it was like running out of gas in Death Valley. The same question arose, "Are we going to survive this?" (We had no new batteries, the car stereo wasn't working, how was she going to listen to her Paula Abdul tapes? It was the end of the world.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2013 | Ken Bensinger
Chances are the same kind of battery that twice caught fire in Boeing 787 Dreamliners in recent weeks is in your pocket at this very moment. Lithium ion batteries, small and powerful, have become the electricity storage device of choice. They are everywhere -- in cellular phones, laptops, power tools, even cars. They allow us to talk, email and drill longer than ever possible in the past. But the incidents that led to the grounding of the 787 fleet worldwide, and the decision by Boeing on Friday to temporarily halt all deliveries of the plane, have highlighted a troubling downside of these energy-dense dynamos: their tendency to occasionally burst into flames.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2011 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
When Greg Stone flies his model airplanes in Irvine at Orange County Great Park — fittingly on the site of the former El Toro Marine Corps Air Station — he's surrounded by the buzz of the tiny electric motors that power his planes and those of fellow hobbyists. It's a sharp contrast to when fuel-powered model planes — which were much louder, as well as faster than the electric models — dominated the hobby. The radio-controlled electric planes, powered by lightweight, rechargeable batteries, have become increasingly popular with model aviation buffs who want an alternative to traditional fuel-powered models.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2006 | Emily Fredrix, The Associated Press
Batteries that can be recharged rather than tossed when the juice runs out are supposed to be more convenient for consumers. But for Wren Wright, they lose their power too quickly and unpredictably, sometimes leaving the shutterbug with no power for his digital camera. Now, major battery makers are recharging their offerings with new models that promise to hold their power longer and don't have to be plugged in for hours before the first use.
REAL ESTATE
November 11, 1990 | JAMES DULLEY
QUESTION: My children have a lot of battery-operated toys, and I have several battery devices too. Are rechargeable batteries a good buy and is much electricity used to recharge them? ANSWER: For most of your battery-operated toys and devices, rechargeable batteries are your best buy. The amount of electricity used to recharge them in the small charger is negligible.
NEWS
February 11, 2012 | By Judii Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Satechi 's BT wireless bluetooth speaker looks like a tiny little hovercraft with a pop-up midsection. It won't actually go airborne, but the sound will. It pairs easily with Bluetooth smartphones and other audio devices for wireless amplified music or phone conversations, thanks to an integrated mike, up to a distance of 33 feet. It also has a built-in 3.5mm audio jack for connecting non-Bluetooth electronics and built-in rechargeable batteries. It comes with a USB cable for charging and powering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
To call attention to the need to protect one of the Earth's natural resources, the Westlake Yacht Club and the Westlake Women's Club will hold the 4th annual Ecology Festival and Regatta for Water Awareness on Sunday at Westlake Lake. The festival of races, information booths and games will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Landing, 32139 Lindero Canyon Road, in Westlake Village.
NEWS
November 24, 1995 | NANCY ROMMELMANN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The holidays are coming, and with them a dreaded annual purchase. No, not fruitcake. Batteries. Technology has launched a new tradition, one in which batteries have become as entrenched in the festivities as gift-giving. For lights, for cameras, for the proverbial noisy toy. Hard as every parent tries to extol the virtues of Lincoln Logs, the kids probably want Missy Wah-Wah, and that crybaby needs juice.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Since a new generation of electric cars went on sale 18 months ago, the results have been far from jolting. Sales of what are considered "pure" electric cars - they run off just a battery - have risen to slightly over 4,100 during the first six months of this year, up just 6% from the same period a year earlier, according to auto information company Edmunds.com. The gain, which amounts to just 234 cars, comes even though Ford, BMW, Honda and Mitsubishi all have joined pioneer Nissan in offering electric vehicles.
NEWS
February 11, 2012 | By Judii Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Satechi 's BT wireless bluetooth speaker looks like a tiny little hovercraft with a pop-up midsection. It won't actually go airborne, but the sound will. It pairs easily with Bluetooth smartphones and other audio devices for wireless amplified music or phone conversations, thanks to an integrated mike, up to a distance of 33 feet. It also has a built-in 3.5mm audio jack for connecting non-Bluetooth electronics and built-in rechargeable batteries. It comes with a USB cable for charging and powering.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2011 | By Cyndia Zwahlen
When Greg Stone flies his model airplanes in Irvine at Orange County Great Park — fittingly on the site of the former El Toro Marine Corps Air Station — he's surrounded by the buzz of the tiny electric motors that power his planes and those of fellow hobbyists. It's a sharp contrast to when fuel-powered model planes — which were much louder, as well as faster than the electric models — dominated the hobby. The radio-controlled electric planes, powered by lightweight, rechargeable batteries, have become increasingly popular with model aviation buffs who want an alternative to traditional fuel-powered models.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Tesla Motors Inc. shares surged Thursday after Panasonic Corp., which makes rechargeable batteries among its many products, bought a $30-million stake in the electric car company. Panasonic, based in Osaka, Japan, paid $21.15 a share Wednesday in a private placement, Palo Alto-based Tesla said in a statement. Panasonic now holds about a 2% stake in the company. In afternoon trading, Tesla shares jumped $3.13, or 14.4%, to $24.90. Last week, Tesla opened the doors of its Fremont, Calif.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2006 | Emily Fredrix, The Associated Press
Batteries that can be recharged rather than tossed when the juice runs out are supposed to be more convenient for consumers. But for Wren Wright, they lose their power too quickly and unpredictably, sometimes leaving the shutterbug with no power for his digital camera. Now, major battery makers are recharging their offerings with new models that promise to hold their power longer and don't have to be plugged in for hours before the first use.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2002 | Associated Press
Rayovac Corp. said it has developed a new rechargeable battery that will take only 15 minutes to recharge. The technology will cut recharging time from one hour for its most powerful rechargeable batteries, designed for high-drain devices such as digital cameras, the Madison, Wis.-based battery maker said.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Tesla Motors Inc. shares surged Thursday after Panasonic Corp., which makes rechargeable batteries among its many products, bought a $30-million stake in the electric car company. Panasonic, based in Osaka, Japan, paid $21.15 a share Wednesday in a private placement, Palo Alto-based Tesla said in a statement. Panasonic now holds about a 2% stake in the company. In afternoon trading, Tesla shares jumped $3.13, or 14.4%, to $24.90. Last week, Tesla opened the doors of its Fremont, Calif.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | LIZ THOMPSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Experimental batteries based on an unusual form of iron deliver 50% more energy than regular batteries and decompose to nothing more threatening than rust, researchers in Israel reported Friday. The researchers also developed a modified version of the cell that is 75% rechargeable. Experts hailed the discoveries as intriguing but remain uncertain about the practical applications.
SPORTS
November 15, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
After two days off, the Kings went through a 79-minute workout at the HealthSouth Training Center in El Segundo on Tuesday, and Coach Andy Murray was pleased with what he saw. "We had no one standing around," he said. "It was a really good practice. Everyone was focused." Murray had given his players the previous two days off because of a four-day stretch without a game.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Sony Corp. made news last week with the U.S. launch of its visionary PlayStation2 product in Los Angeles and the naming of a new president in Tokyo, whose appointment signals that the company will continue internal reforms to prepare itself for a future dominated by the Internet. In Japan, Sony is regarded once again as a model, leading its country's industries into a new age of technology and international opportunity. It has put defeat behind it. Everyone recalls Sony's dramatic history.
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