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Recidivism

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OPINION
November 30, 2013
Re "Catch a cold, go to prison," Editorial, Nov. 26 This editorial's brilliant parsing of the word "recidivism" has major implications for public policy, including prison overcrowding and, even more important, how parolees are treated. As proposed, technical violations of parole such as missing an appointment or even failing a drug test should not be considered recidivism. Such violations should be evaluated within the context of the individual. For example, is the violator a first-time, nonviolent offender (felon or not)
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OPINION
February 12, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
There's always one kid in class who gets away with it. You know the one. The teacher says the homework is due Friday and if you don't turn it in, you flunk. But this kid pleads for more time. Just give him the weekend and he promises to get it done. The teacher says OK, then Monday comes and he asks to be given until the end of the week. And then he promises to turn it in at the end of the year. Then he says he can get it done by next April. Promise. Now, how about two years from now?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1997 | FRANKLIN E. ZIMRING, Franklin E. Zimring is a professor of law and director of the Earl Warren Legal Institute at UC Berkeley
When Gov. Pete Wilson signed California's "chemical castration" law last September, he told a press conference that child molesters "have a drive to do what they do. As long as they have that drive, they'll keep doing it--unless we do something about it first."
OPINION
November 30, 2013
Re "Catch a cold, go to prison," Editorial, Nov. 26 This editorial's brilliant parsing of the word "recidivism" has major implications for public policy, including prison overcrowding and, even more important, how parolees are treated. As proposed, technical violations of parole such as missing an appointment or even failing a drug test should not be considered recidivism. Such violations should be evaluated within the context of the individual. For example, is the violator a first-time, nonviolent offender (felon or not)
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial Arizona law that diverts nonviolent drug offenders from prison and into one of the nation's most sweeping drug treatment programs has registered remarkable early successes, according to a report scheduled to be released today by the Arizona Supreme Court. More than three-quarters of the 2,622 offenders who completed the program tested negative for drugs, the report said.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of convicted felons released on probation, 43% are rearrested for another crime within three years, the Justice Department reported Sunday. Officials said also that only a small percentage of the tens of thousands of probationers nationwide fully comply with court-ordered terms. The department's Bureau of Justice Statistics based the findings on a study described as the largest follow-up investigation of felony probationers ever conducted. Of the 4.
OPINION
September 16, 2013 | By Lois Davis
If California is serious about reducing its prison population, one crucial component will have to be reducing recidivism. Currently, a lot of the state's inmates are men and women who've been in prison more than once. They get out, they have little training or education, they can't get jobs and, in many cases, they return to lives of crime and find themselves back behind bars. But a major new study of correctional education in U.S. state prisons suggests there are things California could do to slow that revolving door.
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A new study reports that prison education programs are the cheapest, most effective means of cutting recidivism. With national rearrest rates for adult offenders at 60% and nearly 80% for juveniles, the study finds that inmates with at least two years of college education had better chances of getting jobs and a recidivism rate of only 10%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1997
In "The Truth About Repeat Sex Offenders" (Commentary, May 5), Franklin Zimring takes Gov. Pete Wilson to task for claiming that there is a 75% recidivism rate within two years after release from prison. Zimring states that this is contrary to the Department of Corrections statistics, citing a 26% two-year recidivism rate for lewd conduct offenders. I do not purport to be an expert in these statistics, but any statistics I have seen indicate a much higher recidivism rate for child molesters.
OPINION
April 29, 2006
Re "Parole in California: It's a crime," Current, April 23 The true crime is how much money is wasted each year by PhDs doing criminal justice research such as the opinions of the two authors of this article. Recidivism, and in particular "rehabilitation," in California has always been a joke in our law enforcement communities. As a taxpayer, I understand the dynamics of tail (unions) wagging the dog (administration). But even sadder is to read a comment such as: "But there's no denying that our high recidivism rate wastes human opportunity and disrupts family life in unquantifiable ways."
OPINION
September 16, 2013 | By Lois Davis
If California is serious about reducing its prison population, one crucial component will have to be reducing recidivism. Currently, a lot of the state's inmates are men and women who've been in prison more than once. They get out, they have little training or education, they can't get jobs and, in many cases, they return to lives of crime and find themselves back behind bars. But a major new study of correctional education in U.S. state prisons suggests there are things California could do to slow that revolving door.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Jack Leonard
More than 1,000 inmates previously sentenced to life in prison have been freed since voters approved changes to California's three-strikes law in November, with only a handful charged with new offenses since their release, according to a report released Monday. The authors of the report , who helped write and campaign for the ballot initiative, said third-strikers released under Proposition 36 have a lower recidivism rate than other prisoners freed on parole, helping save the state millions of dollars by opening up space in crowded prisons without jeopardizing public safety.
OPINION
April 16, 2013
Re "Brown vows fight over prisons," April 13 Federal courts have found the overcrowding and inmate healthcare in California's prisons intolerable, even though Gov. Jerry Brown says officials are "doing the best job possible. " Maybe they're both right and it's the justice system itself that is beyond correction and rehabilitation. Our high-imprisonment system has taken decades to build. It has been fed by harsher sentences without regard for recidivism or public safety; guilty pleas extorted from low-level offenders under pressure from multiple charges that carry long prison terms; the addiction of law enforcement and elected officials to the war on drugs; and released offenders who can't get a job or the public assistance they need to live.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2010 | By Julian E. Barnes and Christi Parsons
A new report estimates that one-fifth of the detainees who have been released from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have resumed extremist activity, a Defense Department official said Wednesday, a figure that intensifies the debate over the prison. The Pentagon report on the released detainees remains classified and officials refused to discuss it publicly. But Pentagon Press Secretary Geoff Morrell acknowledged the numbers had risen since April, when the department said about 74 former detainees -- about 14% of those released -- had returned to hostile action against the United States.
OPINION
January 25, 2009
Re "Revisit Jessica's Law," editorial, Jan. 19 While California has gone to great expense to outfit all people on parole for sex offenses with GPS monitors, regardless of risk level, it has recently suspended all contracts with providers of specialized sex-offender treatment to parolees. In other words, one of the few proven tools for reducing recidivism among sex offenders has been sidelined because of the current budget crisis, while an outrageously expensive tactic that has not been shown to make a difference in recidivism has been generously funded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2007 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
Until California eases prison overcrowding, it can't slow the revolving prison doors that return roughly 70% of freed inmates within a year, national experts reported to the Legislature on Friday.
NEWS
April 3, 1989
Nearly 63% of the inmates released from state prisons are rearrested for a serious crime within three years, according to a Justice Department study. The department's Bureau of Justice Statistics examined the criminal records of more than 16,000 men and women who were among 109,000 offenders released from the prisons of 11 states in 1983. It found that by the end of 1986, about 62.
OPINION
January 25, 2009
Re "Revisit Jessica's Law," editorial, Jan. 19 While California has gone to great expense to outfit all people on parole for sex offenses with GPS monitors, regardless of risk level, it has recently suspended all contracts with providers of specialized sex-offender treatment to parolees. In other words, one of the few proven tools for reducing recidivism among sex offenders has been sidelined because of the current budget crisis, while an outrageously expensive tactic that has not been shown to make a difference in recidivism has been generously funded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2007 | Megan Garvey and Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writers
Convicted drug users in California are more likely to be arrested on new drug charges since Proposition 36 took effect than before voters approved the landmark law mandating drug treatment rather than incarceration, according a long-awaited study released Friday.
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