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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - Officials in the seven states that depend on the drought-beset Colorado River expressed a cautious willingness Tuesday to join the federal government in a complex, possibly contentious effort to step up conservation. At a meeting in San Diego, officials of the Department of the Interior and the Bureau of Reclamation announced the establishment of three inter-state committees to devise plans for conservation, possibly including water reuse, desalination, water banking and the sale of water from farms to cities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
February 21, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Central Valley growers Friday got the grim news they have been expecting for months. Most of them will get no water from the big federal irrigation project that supplies 3 million acres of California farm land. Citing the state's severe drought, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation announced an initial water allocation of zero for most contractors of the sprawling Central Valley Project. That could change. There is a month of winter left and storms on the Northern California horizon could boost reservoir levels, allowing reclamation to deliver more water.
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HOME & GARDEN
April 15, 2010 | Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Soap star Peter Reckell and his wife, singer Kelly Moneymaker, have listed their custom-built eco-friendly home in Brentwood for $6,499,000. The couple had their original home on the site torn down, crated and shipped to Mexico for reuse by Habitat for Humanity. Then they designed and built a three-bedroom, four-bathroom contemporary that maximizes solar power and cross-ventilation. Along with an indoor/outdoor koi pond, a meditation fountain and a solar infinity pool, outdoor amenities include a 16th century East Indian temple that was turned into a portico and frames views of the Santa Monica Conservancy.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2013 | By Catherine Green, Los Angeles Times
RIVERDALE, Calif. - Last year, the federal government gave farmer Dan Errotabere half of the water it had awarded him the previous year to cultivate his 5,200 acres. But he still managed to reap a yield as much as 25% higher. "I've got to do more with less," said Errotabere, 57, who grows cotton, tomatoes, almonds and pistachios among other crops on his family's ranch in the Central Valley northwest of Visalia. His trick? The increasingly popular drip-tape method of irrigation, which pumps water directly to a plant's roots.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1987
CalMat Co., a Los Angeles cement producer, said it sold its wholly owned subsidiary, Valley Reclamation Co. to Waste Management of North America Inc. for $48.4 million.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - A penny for your thoughts? No? How about $2? A federal agency's mailing of $2 bills to about 10,000 households to encourage their participation in a survey has led to proposed legislation to end the government's use of such cash incentives. "No wonder the U.S. is having money problems if the government has extra $2 bills to mail out randomly," wrote one recipient, according to Rep. Scott Tipton (R-Colo.), who proposed the legislation.  The Bureau of Reclamation last year sent out the $2 bills to encourage participation in a survey about the future of the Klamath River Basin in Northern California and southern Oregon.
NEWS
January 29, 1987
The Lakewood City Council has taken its first step toward construction of a water reclamation project that will allow the city to pipe in irrigation water from a county reclamation plant in Cerritos. The council unanimously approved a $99,500 agreement with the engineering firm of Kennedy, Jenks and Chilton to design the project, which will consist of a series of pipes linking the city with the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts plant, according to a staff report.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1988 | United Press International
The Bureau of Reclamation has awarded a $375,000 contract to a Utah construction company for modifications to the spillway gates at Glen Canyon Dam in northern Arizona, bureau spokesman Barry Wirth said. The contract with G.V. Contracting, Midvale, Utah, calls for removal of the flashboards on four of the huge spillway gates at the dam and installation of reinforcements on the gate arms, Wirth said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1987
Back in the 1950s and 1960s, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation rode high, wide and handsome. The bureau's success at building great dams and reservoirs, and turning deserts green, was epitomized in those days by its flamboyant and cocky director, Floyd Dominy. "He was a magician with Congress," an acquaintance once said. "His friends there would do anything for him." But the bureau fell on hard times in the late 1970s and 1980s. All the best projects had been built or were under construction.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2013 | By Catherine Green, Los Angeles Times
RIVERDALE, Calif. - Last year, the federal government gave farmer Dan Errotabere half of the water it had awarded him the previous year to cultivate his 5,200 acres. But he still managed to reap a yield as much as 25% higher. "I've got to do more with less," said Errotabere, 57, who grows cotton, tomatoes, almonds and pistachios among other crops on his family's ranch in the Central Valley northwest of Visalia. His trick? The increasingly popular drip-tape method of irrigation, which pumps water directly to a plant's roots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - Officials in the seven states that depend on the drought-beset Colorado River expressed a cautious willingness Tuesday to join the federal government in a complex, possibly contentious effort to step up conservation. At a meeting in San Diego, officials of the Department of the Interior and the Bureau of Reclamation announced the establishment of three inter-state committees to devise plans for conservation, possibly including water reuse, desalination, water banking and the sale of water from farms to cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - As a regional drought tightens its grip on the Colorado River, water agency officials, environmentalists, farmers and Indian tribal leaders from the seven states that depend on the river for survival are expected to gather Tuesday for a "moving forward" meeting called by federal officials. Last year was dry, this year is even worse, officials said. If the trend continues, Lake Powell and Lake Mead, the Colorado River's two giant reservoirs, will be at 45% capacity by year's end, their lowest since 1968.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - Amid a worsening drought along the Colorado River, 40-plus water agency officials, environmentalists, farmers and Indian tribal leaders from the seven states that depend on the river for survival are gathered here for a “moving forward” meeting called by federal officials. Last year was dry; this year is even worse, officials said. If the trend continues, Lake Powell and Lake Mead, the Colorado River's two giant reservoirs, will be at 45% capacity by year's end, their lowest since 1968.
OPINION
December 27, 2012 | By Wade Graham
A study released last week by the Bureau of Reclamation confirms what everyone already knows: We are sucking more water out of the Colorado River Basin than nature is putting in. Like draining a savings account, water users in the seven basin states (Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada and California) and Mexico have been drawing down Lake Powell and Lake Mead by about a million more acre-feet of water than rain and snowmelt provide each year. According to the bureau, users' plans for yet more pipelines combined with the effects of global warming, will push the annual deficit as high as 8 million acre-feet by 2060, a cataclysmic shortfall.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - A penny for your thoughts? No? How about $2? A federal agency's mailing of $2 bills to about 10,000 households to encourage their participation in a survey has led to proposed legislation to end the government's use of such cash incentives. "No wonder the U.S. is having money problems if the government has extra $2 bills to mail out randomly," wrote one recipient, according to Rep. Scott Tipton (R-Colo.), who proposed the legislation.  The Bureau of Reclamation last year sent out the $2 bills to encourage participation in a survey about the future of the Klamath River Basin in Northern California and southern Oregon.
SPORTS
May 17, 2011 | T.J. Simers
It's Tuesday night and I'm supposed to be sitting in Staples Center, the Lakers and Oklahoma City going at it in a playoff opener. But instead I'm talking to James Loney . Life just isn't fair. The Dodgers are already eliminated, but they get to keep playing. By the way, would someone tap Loney on the shoulder and tell him the Dodgers still are playing. I never watched the TV show, but "Lost" pretty much describes James Loney. So does "automatic out" or "first base flop.
OPINION
July 27, 2003
"Everyone Pays Price for Backroom Water Grab From Farmers," the Imperial Irrigation District's July 15 commentary over the ongoing dispute over Colorado River water, deserves a response. Through federal contracts, the right to use Colorado River water has long been recognized; however, wasting water and preventing others from using it is not. The Bureau of Reclamation has authority to see that the Imperial district and other water contractors do not waste waters of the Colorado. In April 2003, a U.S. district court ordered the Bureau of Reclamation to conduct a meticulous review to determine Imperial Irrigation District's "reasonable beneficial use."
OPINION
February 1, 2006
Re "Traces of Prescription Drugs Found in Southland Aquifers," Jan. 30 Prescription drugs in reclaimed water -- that's no surprise. The National Research Council, in a 1998 study, indicated that reclaimed water is unsafe for drinking because the technology does not exist to test for thousands of potential toxins and carcinogens that can survive the reclamation process. Instead of waiting for the other shoe to drop, water districts should be considering technologies, such as desalination, that are now less expensive and produce safer water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Floyd E. Dominy, a federal water official with an outsize personality who shepherded some of the West's last big dam projects to completion, has died. He was 100. Dominy, who served as commissioner of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation from 1959 to 1969 under four presidents, died April 20 at his farm in Boyce, Va. Politically connected, smart and determined, Dominy loomed large in Western water circles. He believed that a good river was a dammed river and ran the bureau before landmark environmental laws made it harder to push through projects with little regard for ecological consequences.
HOME & GARDEN
April 15, 2010 | Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Soap star Peter Reckell and his wife, singer Kelly Moneymaker, have listed their custom-built eco-friendly home in Brentwood for $6,499,000. The couple had their original home on the site torn down, crated and shipped to Mexico for reuse by Habitat for Humanity. Then they designed and built a three-bedroom, four-bathroom contemporary that maximizes solar power and cross-ventilation. Along with an indoor/outdoor koi pond, a meditation fountain and a solar infinity pool, outdoor amenities include a 16th century East Indian temple that was turned into a portico and frames views of the Santa Monica Conservancy.
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