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NEWS
April 10, 1995 | PAUL LIEBERMAN and JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As she lay on her deathbed behind the wrought-iron gates of Falcon Lair, Doris Duke was surrounded by what passed for family after a lifetime spent nurturing one of America's great fortunes. At her side were four enormous guard dogs, her personal maid, the lawyer who drafted the last of her many wills and the man who hit the jackpot in that will--Bernard Lafferty, the soft-spoken Irish butler with the blond ponytail and penchant for diamond jewelry.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When news emerged three years ago that filmmaker Shane Salerno and writer David Shields were working on a lengthy oral biography (with accompanying documentary) about J.D. Salinger, I assumed it would be all smoke and no fire. Salinger, after all, had gone to ground after the publication of his novella “Hapworth 16, 1924” in the June 19, 1965, issue of the New Yorker; even in the wake of his death, in January 2010 at age 91, his estate had preserved the silence of his final 45 years.
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WORLD
May 23, 2008 | Tina Susman and Raheem Salman, Times Staff Writers
Abu Hassan took deep breaths of joy as he crossed the double-decker bridge spanning the Tigris River. The water below may have stunk of sewage. The air may have been choked with traffic fumes. It didn't matter to Abu Hassan. He was free after nearly a year hidden inside his house, the only place he had felt safe from the gunmen and killers who had taken over his neighborhood in south Baghdad.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2013 | By Wesley Lowery, Los Angeles Times
The crowd at New York's legendary Comedy Cellar is always primed for high-profile drop-ins like Louis C.K. and Jerry Seinfeld. But this was different. Dave Chappelle was in New York - and on stage. Chappelle, one of the country's most sought-after yet reclusive comedians after walking away in 2005 from his still-influential Comedy Central show, spent three recent nights onstage at the Cellar, sometimes joined by friends, including Chris Rock, Kevin Hart, Marlon Wayans and Paul Mooney.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
The actress who portrayed housekeeper Aunt Bee on "The Andy Griffith Show" lived her last years in seclusion in a dark, dingy house and kept a 1966 green Studebaker with four flat tires in the garage. The home of Frances Bavier reflects little of the coziness of the fictional house that Aunt Bee managed for Mayberry's sheriff and his young son on the popular television series of the 1960s. The 86-year-old Miss Bavier died Dec.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | EMILY ADAMS
To get to know Maxine Hong Kingston, without benefit of a formal introduction, one must be a bit of an archeologist. The bare facts are here: A highly acclaimed writer, she won the National Book Critics Circle in 1976 for "Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts." This was followed by an American Book Award in 1981 for "China Men." That same year, she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Catherine Warnow and Regina Weinrich's sprightly, 57-minute "Paul Bowles: The Complete Outsider" (opening Friday, with a premiere benefiting the Homestead Hospice and Shelter at the Nuart, where it will play one week) offers a tantalizing sketch of the legendary expatriate writer-composer who, at the suggestion of his mentor Gertrude Stein, moved to Tangier decades ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2008 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Bobby Fischer, the enigmatic American chess genius who became a Cold War hero with his 1972 defeat of Soviet champion Boris Spassky but fell from grace in later decades when he became a recluse and fugitive known for his hate-filled rants, has died. He was 64. The legendary chess champion died Thursday in Reykjavik, Iceland, after a long illness, according to his spokesman, Gardar Sverrisson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2001 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Neil, the influential folk musician whose song "Everybody's Talkin' " became the theme of the film "Midnight Cowboy" but who turned his back on the fame that seemed to be his for the asking and became one of pop music's legendary recluses, has died. He was 64. Neil was found Saturday at his Florida home in Summerland Key by a friend, Kathleen Brooks, who had been checking in on him regularly, Morris County Sheriff's Department spokeswoman Becky Herrin said Monday.
NEWS
October 15, 1986 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
Before Beverly Hills recluse Liliore Green Rains died at age 76 last November, she gave no hint that she intended to leave almost all of her quarter-billion-dollar fortune to six institutions that either hardly knew her or did not know her at all. The childless widow, heir to an oil and real estate fortune estimated at more than $250 million, split $240 million equally among four schools and two hospitals, with few strings attached.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Reclusive author J.D. Salinger will be given the full biography treatment, thanks to Shane Salerno, David Shields and Simon & Schuster. Shields and Salerno's "The Private War of J.D. Salinger" will be published by Simon & Schuster in September of this year. The author of "The Catcher in the Rye" famously withdrew from public life in 1953 and for more than 50 years closely guarded his privacy, including suing to prevent one biographer from using material from his unpublished letters.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2012 | By Allan M. Jalon
SANTA BARBARA - Chinese scrolls often show landscapes of mountains, deep-cut gorges and paths that spiral through them and past caves in foliage. On these paths, often barely visible, smallish robed figures walk alone or sit in a group. Even people relatively familiar with this kind of art have peered at the finely drawn figures and wondered: Who are they? What are they up to? The Santa Barbara Museum of Art is offering an unusually comprehensive answer to such questions with a far-reaching show called "The Artful Recluse: Painting, Poetry, and Politics in 17th Century China.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
Northern Nevada officials say there's a lesson here of a Howard Hughes ilk: You can never judge a person's worth by the kind of life he or she leads. Authorities in Carson City recently made an astounding discovery in the home of a local recluse whose body was found in his residence. Walter Samaszko Jr. had left only $200 in his bank account. But hidden throughout the house were other treasures - including gold bars and coins valued at $7 million. “You never anticipate running into anything like this,” Carson City Clerk-Recorder Alan Glover told the Los Angeles Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Shulamith Firestone, whose 1970 book "The Dialectic of Sex" became a feminist classic with its calls for a drastic rethinking of women's roles in the bearing and raising of children, was found dead Tuesday in her New York City apartment. She was 67. A recluse who struggled with mental illness in later years, the author apparently died of natural causes, said her sister, Miriam Tirzah Firestone. Only 25 when "The Dialectic of Sex" was published, Firestone vaulted to prominence as a leading theorist of the second wave of feminism that crested in the 1960s and '70s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2012 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
The Monkees were dealt a blow earlier this year when the band's lead singer, Davy Jones, died of a heart attack in February. Now its surviving members are moving forward and will reunite for a U.S. tour. The band -- Peter Tork, Micky Dolenz  and historically reclusive member Mike Nesmith -- have announced that they will hit the road for an Evening with the Monkees, a 12-date trek this fall. It will be the first shows the three have performed together in 15 years. The tour kicks off Nov. 8 in Escondido, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Will the famously reclusive artist Michael Heizer show up for the grand opening of his "Levitated Mass" sculpture at the L.A. County Museum of Art on Sunday? LACMA officials will say only that they "anticipate his presence. " Then there's the larger question: whether the unveiling of Heizer's monumental artwork, featuring a 340-ton boulder suspended over a 456-foot-long concrete channel, will stir up anything like the public excitement the rock's 11-night journey through city streets did. "Levitated Mass" is scheduled to open with a dedication ceremony at 11 a.m. When the ceremony ends around 11:30, visitors may begin entering the channel.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The attorneys general of Arizona and Utah announced a $10,000 reward in Phoenix for information leading to the arrest of the reclusive leader of a polygamous church based in communities along the states' common border. Warren Jeffs, 49, who has not been publicly sighted in months, was charged in Arizona in early June with counts that include conspiracy to commit sexual conduct with a minor.
NEWS
May 28, 1995
Alfred (Al) Kelly, 87, a recluse who lived in Elysian Park near Dodger Stadium for nearly half a century. A 1988 article about his spare existence revealed that he got by each day by pedaling his worn bicycle to Griffith Park, where he picked up lost golf balls and resold them. He also sold aluminum cans for food money and lived mainly on the park's hillsides, sleeping on a patch of carpet that he covered with blankets and a plastic tarp during inclement weather.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Months after the death of a reclusive 104-year old heiress, the legal skirmishes over her $400-million estate come down to a battle of wills — two of them. Huguette Clark died in May in the New York City hospital where she had lived for at least 20 years. In her 2005 will, she left large sums to a few people — including about $34 million to her nurse — and asked that her Santa Barbara mansion be turned into an art museum. On Monday, however, a second will surfaced in court documents.
WORLD
August 25, 2011 | By John M. Glionna and Khristina Narizhnaya, Los Angeles Times
Reclusive North Korean leader Kim Jong Il met with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev in remote eastern Siberia on Wednesday, reportedly to discuss such issues as a natural gas pipeline, economic aid and nuclear disarmament. Kim, on his first trip to Russia in nearly a decade, is desperate for economic aid for his starving country, and Medvedev is seeking to bolster Russia's economic involvement in Northeast Asia. Moscow wants to build a pipeline through the Korean peninsula to sell Siberian natural gas to North Korea, Japan and South Korea.
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