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Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone

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NEWS
August 11, 1992 | STEPHANIE GRACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government should ban the sale of milk and beef from cows treated with an experimental growth hormone until the Food and Drug Administration can answer lingering safety questions, according to a General Accounting Office report released Monday. The report also called for the FDA to withhold final approval of recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone, or rBGH, until the issue is resolved. FDA and industry officials insisted, however, the products are safe.
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NEWS
August 11, 1992 | STEPHANIE GRACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government should ban the sale of milk and beef from cows treated with an experimental growth hormone until the Food and Drug Administration can answer lingering safety questions, according to a General Accounting Office report released Monday. The report also called for the FDA to withhold final approval of recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone, or rBGH, until the issue is resolved. FDA and industry officials insisted, however, the products are safe.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1994
It is simply outrageous that the State of California refuses to require labeling of milk and dairy products produced using Posilac (the brand name for recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone, rBGH). The "scientific community" to which Agriculture Secretary Henry Voss refers are by and large paid lackeys of Monsanto. The scientific community has previously assured us of the safety of nuclear radiation, asbestos and tobacco, among other things. Not exactly an impressive track record. Beyond health, though, the real issues are about economics and democracy.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1997 | From Washington Post
Connoisseurs of Ben & Jerry's ice cream won't have to wonder any longer whether it's made from milk from cows treated with artificial growth hormones. A settlement announced Thursday between the state of Illinois and a coalition of organic food companies, including the Vermont ice cream maker, means that in the future, one glance at the label on a pint of Cherry Garcia or Chunky Monkey will tell you whether the cows that produced the milk it was made from are hormone-free.
HEALTH
November 12, 2001
I had difficulty believing that you would actually publish "Outpouring of Evidence" (Oct. 22). I wouldn't be surprised if the article was funded by the National Dairy Council, as are the majority of the studies touting the supposed benefits of dairy consumption. I believe you have done your reading public an enormous disservice by publishing this one-sided, misinformative article. To call dairy products "lifesaving" is unthinkable. ANDREA L. BELL Long Beach "Outpouring of Evidence" failed to mention that researchers have found links between milk and ovarian cancer, allergies, food intolerance, diabetes, heart disease, cataracts, infertility and colic in babies.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2007 | From Reuters
Five years ago, dairy farmer Leroy Shatto was struggling to stay in business. Today, his herd has more than doubled amid a surge in demand for his product. The difference: a marketing campaign touting Shatto milk as free of artificial hormones. Osborn, Mo.-based Shatto milk comes plain or flavored, but all comes from cows free of the genetically engineered hormone supplements that many conventional dairies give cows to boost their milk production.
FOOD
April 21, 1994 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three congressmen, including Rep. George E. Brown Jr. (D-Riverside), have asked the General Accounting Office to look into a possible conflict of interest involving the federal government's 1993 approval of the controversial animal drug recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone (rBGH). Brown, who chairs the influential House Science and Technology Committee, and Reps. Bernard Sanders (I-Vt.) and David Obey (D-Wis.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canada on Thursday rejected the use of a controversial hormone that boosts milk production in cows, giving U.S. consumer groups a weapon to attempt to overturn the Food and Drug Administration's 1993 approval of the substance. Canada's rejection came after a report found that the substance might harm animals.
FOOD
March 10, 1994 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The debut of Flavr Savr, the genetically engineered tomato, suffered yet another setback recently when a public hearing on its safety was canceled without rescheduling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Developed by Calgene Inc., the Flavr Savr was originally supposed to reach supermarket produce counters more than a year ago, but its introduction has been repeatedly delayed as the FDA reviews the genetic alterations in the tomato that allow for vine ripening and extended shelf life.
OPINION
March 20, 1994 | SAMUEL S. EPSTEIN, Dr. Samuel S. Epstein is professor of occupational and environmental medicine at the University of Illinois School of Public Health and chairman of the Cancer Prevention Coalition Inc. The concerns in this article have been sent to the FDA and the National Cancer Institute
The Food and Drug Administration recently warned dairy producers, distributors and retailers against "hormone-free" labels on milk from cows that have not been given the biotech milk-production stimulant known as recombinant bovine growth hormone. The FDA states that such labeling could be "false or misleading" under federal law, as there is "no significant difference between milk from treated and untreated cows."
FOOD
February 23, 1995 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An ambitious Agriculture Department proposal to modernize the nation's meat and poultry inspection system, which includes mandatory laboratory testing for contamination and detailed record keeping requirements, will significantly increase the responsibilities required of slaughter and processing companies--if it passes Congressional scrutiny. The proposal arrives at a time when the Republican-controlled Congress is calling for a moratorium on all new federal regulations.
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