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Reconnaissance

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BUSINESS
November 11, 2010 | W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A Global Hawk robotic plane, hovering more than 11 miles above Afghanistan, can snap images of Taliban hide-outs so crystal clear that U.S. intelligence officials can make out the pickup trucks parked nearby ? and how long they've been there. Halfway around the globe in a underground laboratory in El Segundo, Raytheon Co. engineers who helped develop the cameras and sensors for the pilotless spy plane are now working on even more powerful devices that are revolutionizing the way the military gathers intelligence.
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SCIENCE
March 12, 2014 | By Amina Khan
NASA's elderly Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter flipped into “safe mode” on Sunday after an unexpected computing glitch caused the spacecraft to switch from its main computer to its backup. The 8-year-old satellite, which left Earth in August 2005 and entered Martian orbit on March 10, 2006, has lived well beyond its primary two-year science phase, so perhaps the occasional "brain fart" is understandable. Tasked with searching for signs that water flowed on Mars for a long period of time, it's been sending Earth detailed information about seasonal and longer-term changes on our rust-hued neighbor . In fact, it has returned more data than all other interplanetary missions combined, according to officials at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge, which manages the mission.
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TRAVEL
October 11, 2013 | By Susan Spano
MONTEREY BAY, Calif. - Along Highway 1 between Marina and Seaside, it's all roller-coastering sand dunes and chaparral. There the road cuts across Ft. Ord, where soldiers trained for almost every war the U.S. Army waged in the 20th century, as well as deployments to Panama and the 1992 L.A. riots. Then Ft. Ord closed and it was over. In 1994, 36,000 soldiers and their families were relocated, emptying hospitals, barracks, chapels, stockades and 28,000 prime Central Coast acres.
TRAVEL
October 11, 2013 | By Susan Spano
MONTEREY BAY, Calif. - Along Highway 1 between Marina and Seaside, it's all roller-coastering sand dunes and chaparral. There the road cuts across Ft. Ord, where soldiers trained for almost every war the U.S. Army waged in the 20th century, as well as deployments to Panama and the 1992 L.A. riots. Then Ft. Ord closed and it was over. In 1994, 36,000 soldiers and their families were relocated, emptying hospitals, barracks, chapels, stockades and 28,000 prime Central Coast acres.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
The Pentagon said it had canceled the Army's $6-billion reconnaissance helicopter program being developed by Bell Helicopter. Defense Undersecretary John Young said officials decided to dump the program -- which has been over budget and behind schedule -- and instead buy replacements for the existing Kiowa aircraft. Development of the Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter was initially set at about $359 million, with each aircraft costing about $8.5 million. That price has soared to $942 million for development and nearly $14.5 million for each craft.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1985 | DJ
Scientific Communications Inc. said it signed a $6.225-million contract with Rohde & Schwarz of West Germany to supply radar reconnaissance receivers for surveillance systems to be made by Rohde & Schwarz for the West German navy.
NEWS
January 24, 1991
The Defense Department defines sortie as "a sudden attack made from a defensive position" and "an operational flight by one aircraft." So when a Pentagon briefing makes reference to "400 sorties," that number includes all the aircraft that might participate in the bombing runs--not just the bombers. This includes escorts planes, cover patrols, AWACS and refueling craft and reconnaissance flights.
NEWS
August 3, 1987 | From Reuters
The West German army is testing a secret new military reconnaissance plane made almost entirely from synthetic materials, the news magazine Der Spiegel reported Sunday. It said in a report made available ahead of today's publication that the single-engine, one-seater plane had made its maiden test flight near Ingolstadt in the south of West Germany on June 24. The Defense Ministry refused to comment.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. military officials have recovered the wreckage of an American warplane lost in June 1941 over Panama. The remains had been found in a mountainous jungle area. The observation plane was lost during a night mission. Panama was a key base for U.S. air missions in World War II. Five other U.S. reconnaissance planes were lost over the country during the war but have not been located. Bones and teeth were found in the wreckage and were expected to confirm that three U.S. airmen died in the crash.
NEWS
November 8, 1988
U.S. fighter jets have intercepted Soviet reconnaissance planes three times in the last three weeks, marking what appears to be a seasonal upswing in Soviet activity off the East Coast, officials said. "The trend is that these things go on in the spring and in the fall," said Capt. Larry Jenkins, a spokesman for the Air Force's Tactical Air Command Headquarters at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
Ryan Mathys spent weeks prospecting. He drove up and down the little avenue in Solana Beach, taking notes and knocking on doors. He scoured public records. He blanketed the seaside neighborhood in northern San Diego County with inquiries. All the detective work had a dollars-and-cents purpose: to find homes the owners would be willing to sell. Southern California housing prices are rising sharply, and there's a shortage of houses available for sale. So agents like Mathys are resorting to reconnaissance and back-channel networks to find homes that haven't yet hit the market.
SCIENCE
June 21, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft has found that the Shackleton crater at the moon's frigid south pole contains about 22% ice on its surface, astronomers reported Thursday in the journal Nature. To their surprise, the team apparently saw more ice on the walls of the crater than on its floor. Such ice could prove very valuable for any extended moon mission, providing water and a potential fuel source to astronauts. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, known as LRO, was launched in June 2009 to prepare a detailed map of the moon's surface.
WORLD
November 17, 2011 | By David S. Cloud and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Kenya's government has made an urgent appeal to the Obama administration for the Pentagon to provide intelligence and logistical support to Kenya's faltering month-old military operation in Somalia against the Shabab, a powerful Al Qaeda-linked militia. Administration officials are considering the request, which came through the State Department, to provide military surveillance and reconnaissance that could include imagery from drone aircraft. Such aid would represent a significant expansion of U.S. involvement in the chaotic East African nation.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
As a Cobra attack helicopter pilot, Marine Capt. Jim "Hottie" Carlson was running support missions above Afghanistan last summer when it occurred to him that it was taking far too long to find where U.S. troops were under attack. "Do you have any idea how long it takes to find the right map, unfold it, and find where you're going? It's agonizing," he said. Frustrated that he had to flip through dozens of maps stuffed inside his chopper, Carlson, 31, loaded the documents onto his personal iPad, enabling him to zoom in, zoom out and quickly move from one map to another.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A pocket-size drone dubbed the Nano Hummingbird for the way it flaps its tiny robotic wings has been developed for the Pentagon by a Monrovia company as a mini-spy plane capable of maneuvering on the battlefield and in urban areas. The battery-powered drone was built by AeroVironment Inc. for the Pentagon's research arm as part of a series of experiments in nanotechnology. The little flying machine is built to look like a bird for potential use in spy missions. The results of a five-year effort to develop the drone are being announced Thursday by the company and the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2010 | W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A Global Hawk robotic plane, hovering more than 11 miles above Afghanistan, can snap images of Taliban hide-outs so crystal clear that U.S. intelligence officials can make out the pickup trucks parked nearby ? and how long they've been there. Halfway around the globe in a underground laboratory in El Segundo, Raytheon Co. engineers who helped develop the cameras and sensors for the pilotless spy plane are now working on even more powerful devices that are revolutionizing the way the military gathers intelligence.
NEWS
February 10, 1987
The Soviet Union has suffered two major space program accidents in recent weeks, including the largest space-vehicle loss since the U.S. shuttle disaster, an authoritative aerospace journal said. Aviation Week and Space Technology magazine said that a 770-ton SL-12 Proton booster, the Soviet Union's most powerful rocket, failed during an unmanned launch on Jan. 30. A second failure cited by the magazine was the deliberate explosion of a Cosmos military reconnaissance satellite on Jan.
NEWS
April 19, 1986 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writers
The explosion of a Titan 34-D rocket at Vandenberg Air Force Base is a serious setback to the nation's ability to put heavy satellites into orbit and depletes the inventory of photo reconnaissance satellites, sources knowledgeable about the U.S. space program said Friday. Although the Air Force declined to identify the cargo carried by the rocket that exploded, industry experts said it was probably a KH-11 reconnaissance satellite. The United States now has only one such satellite in orbit.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Northrop Grumman Corp. has been awarded a $33-million Pentagon contract to transform its unmanned, long-range spy plane into a roving robotic aerial refueling tanker. The plane, dubbed the Global Hawk, is used for high-altitude reconnaissance missions over Iraq and Afghanistan by the U.S. military. Northrop plans to retrofit the plane so it can carry 1,000 gallons of jet fuel in its fuselage and demonstrate it can autonomously refuel another Global Hawk in midair by next year. "This technology has the potential to be revolutionary," said Mark Gamache, director of Northrop's advanced concepts and technology division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2010 | By Seema Mehta
Ever since childhood, Charles Cartwright had wanted to be a Marine. He joined the service Sept. 10, 2001, soon after graduating from Walkersville High School near the town of Union Bridge, Md., where he grew up. Cartwright, 26, who lived most recently in Oceanside, was killed in combat Nov. 7 in western Afghanistan's Farah province, on the Iranian border. A reconnaissance scout, he was serving his fifth tour of duty. In the weeks since his death, his friends and family have recounted his devotion to his family and country on a memorial Facebook page set up in his honor.
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