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Reconnaissance Satellites

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OPINION
August 19, 1990 | Jeffrey T. Richelson, Jeffrey T. Richelson is the author of "America's Secret Eyes in Space" (Harper & Row)
Saturday marks the 30th birthday of the National Reconnaissance Office. Created by President Dwight D. Eisenhower as the central office for the procurement and operation of U.S. reconnaissance satellites, the NRO has been key in the development of the photographic and signals intelligence satellites that permit arms-control verification, crisis monitoring and the collection of a wide variety of vital intelligence. But there will be no public ceremony or presidential proclamation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Merton E. Davies, a longtime scientist with the Rand Corp. who was a leading figure in the creation of the first space reconnaissance satellites, has died. He was 83. Davies, an engineer, reconnaissance system designer, imagery interpreter and space cartographer, died April 17 at his home in Santa Monica after surgical complications.
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OPINION
February 17, 1991 | Jeffrey T. Richelson, Jeffrey T. Richelson is author of "America's Secret Eyes in Space" (Harper & Row)
At the daily press briefings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and the Pentagon, and in newsrooms across America, reporters can frequently be heard complaining about the answers defense and military spokesmen are giving them on how the war against Iraq is going.
NEWS
April 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
An Air Force rocket thundered into space with a missile-warning satellite in the first Titan IV flight since a spectacular $1-billion launch explosion last August. The Titan IV-B, the nation's largest unmanned rocket, hoisted a Pentagon satellite capable of detecting missile launches as well as nuclear blasts, officials at Cape Canaveral, Fla., said. The Air Force put the cost of the mission at $682 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Merton E. Davies, a longtime scientist with the Rand Corp. who was a leading figure in the creation of the first space reconnaissance satellites, has died. He was 83. Davies, an engineer, reconnaissance system designer, imagery interpreter and space cartographer, died April 17 at his home in Santa Monica after surgical complications.
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration is considering the sale of a high-technology spy satellite to Abu Dhabi, a deal that would make the tiny Persian Gulf emirate the first state in the region to obtain its own space reconnaissance capability, the State Department said Tuesday. Department spokesman Richard Boucher said no decisions will be made on the sale until an interagency committee completes a review of U.S. policy on technology transfer.
NEWS
May 2, 1986 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Much of what the world knows about the Soviet nuclear plant disaster comes from the United States, which gets most of its information from spy satellites whose cameras can show objects on earth as small as a grapefruit. "We were shown satellite pictures of the reactor building from before and immediately after the explosion," California Rep. George E. Brown Jr. (D-Colton), a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said Thursday after a closed-door briefing by U.S. experts.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. intelligence community has begun grappling with one of the most contentious and far-reaching issues it is likely to face in the next few years--whether to let other countries buy American-made reconnaissance satellites, which could be used for spying against U.S. forces or allies. Several countries are eager to buy high-resolution satellites from American companies. The firms, which have supporters in Congress and the U.S.
NEWS
January 22, 1991
It's winter in the Mideast desert, and clouds and fog are having an impact on the war. In this region, the rainy season lasts from November to March. The inclement weather isn't necessarily grounding all planes, but it is affecting the selection of targets, the ability to make damage assessments and perhaps the volume of attacks. Some of the areas in which weather makes a difference: SATELLITES AND RADAR: -- Satellites function best in clear skies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1986 | WILLIAM H. KINCADE, William H. Kincade is a senior associate in technology and security policy at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington.
Except for the element of human tragedy, the explosion of a Titan launch vehicle last month--the second consecutive Titan loss--was as devastating to our space program as the loss of the Challenger shuttle. Last weekend's destruction of an out-of-control Delta rocket carrying a weather satellite--the first Delta loss since 1977--only deepened the dark cloud of questions hovering over the future of U.S. activities in space.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott asked the Air Force to reverse a decision to cancel contracts with Boeing Co. and TRW Inc. that were intended to demonstrate that it's feasible to build a system of low-orbit satellites capable of detecting and tracking ballistic missiles fired at the U.S. The Air Force announced Feb. 5 it had canceled the contracts with the nation's No. 2 and No. 10 defense contractors, because of steep cost overruns.
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by a boom in commercial spy satellites, the Army is poised to fire up a furnace in the New Mexico desert, collect the raging energy on mirrors and focus it into a laser beam aimed to cripple a satellite hundreds of miles up in space. Army scientists hope the million-watt laser, the nation's largest, could blind orbiting eyes that might reveal the position of U.S. and allied troops and weapons in times of war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
With spying on Soviet military targets a thing of the past, U.S. surveillance satellites will focus more on environmental threats to world stability such as erupting volcanoes and shifting desert sands, CIA Director John M. Deutch said Thursday in Beverly Hills.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of spy satellites the United States keeps in orbit to look down on America's enemies and rivals in hot spots around the globe is being cut in half as part of a broader downsizing of the nation's intelligence apparatus, a former CIA director revealed Monday. R. James Woolsey, who stepped down as CIA director in January, also told Congress that several CIA field stations, which house the spy agency's covert operations staff, are being shuttered because of new budget pressures.
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration threatened Friday to launch air strikes against Iraqi troops if they do not resume their withdrawal to the positions they held before advancing recently toward Kuwait, but officials conceded that no military action is imminent. The warning was sounded by Defense Secretary William J. Perry, who said during a visit here that the United States "cannot accept" a Republican Guard division where it has stopped, 125 miles west of the border.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. intelligence community has begun grappling with one of the most contentious and far-reaching issues it is likely to face in the next few years--whether to let other countries buy American-made reconnaissance satellites, which could be used for spying against U.S. forces or allies. Several countries are eager to buy high-resolution satellites from American companies. The firms, which have supporters in Congress and the U.S.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of spy satellites the United States keeps in orbit to look down on America's enemies and rivals in hot spots around the globe is being cut in half as part of a broader downsizing of the nation's intelligence apparatus, a former CIA director revealed Monday. R. James Woolsey, who stepped down as CIA director in January, also told Congress that several CIA field stations, which house the spy agency's covert operations staff, are being shuttered because of new budget pressures.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Senate committee investigating the fate of soldiers missing from the Vietnam War received a closed-door briefing from intelligence officials Friday on a covert mission into Laos that the CIA sponsored in 1981 to search for American POWs. More than a decade later, the CIA still refuses to acknowledge publicly any connection with the mission, whose details remain classified. But former National Security Adviser Richard V.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Soviet satellite picture showing the White House, the Capitol and the Pentagon was used Thursday in Pasadena to advertise once-classified photos the Russians want to sell to American scientists and oil companies. "You can even determine the number of cars parking near Pentagon building," said a sign touting the photographic capabilities of the satellites, which were operated by the Soviet Union before its collapse and now are run by Russia.
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration is considering the sale of a high-technology spy satellite to Abu Dhabi, a deal that would make the tiny Persian Gulf emirate the first state in the region to obtain its own space reconnaissance capability, the State Department said Tuesday. Department spokesman Richard Boucher said no decisions will be made on the sale until an interagency committee completes a review of U.S. policy on technology transfer.
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