Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsReconstruction Los Angeles
IN THE NEWS

Reconstruction Los Angeles

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | ERIN J. AUBRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Paula Walker, Jan. 17, 1994, was a shake-up that proved to be the wake-up call of a lifetime. But it wasn't the fact that the devastating earthquake that day forced the 58-year-old Walker, a West Adams resident, out of her La Brea Avenue home of 27 years and into a cramped Leimert Park apartment, where she is awaiting a city loan to be approved. It isn't even the endless paper trail that attended her many applications for disaster assistance to federal, state and local agencies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | ERIN J. AUBRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Paula Walker, Jan. 17, 1994, was a shake-up that proved to be the wake-up call of a lifetime. But it wasn't the fact that the devastating earthquake that day forced the 58-year-old Walker, a West Adams resident, out of her La Brea Avenue home of 27 years and into a cramped Leimert Park apartment, where she is awaiting a city loan to be approved. It isn't even the endless paper trail that attended her many applications for disaster assistance to federal, state and local agencies.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 3, 1992
A spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency said in Washington late Saturday night that the disaster aid ordered by President Bush would enable homeowners to qualify for low-interest loans of up to $100,000 to cover uninsured losses from the disorder. Businesses would be able to qualify for loans up to $500,000 for such uninsured losses; the rate of interest would range from 4% to 8%, depending on prevailing market rates.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
Shorter business hours and additional security are among the conditions the city Planning Commission was asked to impose on owners of a liquor store destroyed during last year's riots. "This area has a lot of gangs, and with the liquor store, there were always a lot of people hanging out in front of it," said Victor Castro, an employee at Alejandra's Furniture in the 4600 block of Broadway. "We know it will reopen, but we want a guard posted there to help out if there are any problems."
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD and JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peter V. Ueberroth, who guided the city through one of its greatest modern triumphs--the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics--has agreed to take charge of the city's efforts to recover, materially and spiritually, from the holocaust of the past week. Flanked by Mayor Tom Bradley and Gov. Pete Wilson at a City Hall news conference Saturday, Ueberroth announced he would accept Bradley's invitation to head what the mayor's office described as an "extra-governmental task force" to rebuild the city.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Tom Bradley's choice of Peter V. Ueberroth to lead Los Angeles' rebuilding efforts drew divided reaction Sunday, with some questioning whether the man heralded for his organizing skills in the 1984 Olympics can effectively relate to the plight of the city's riot-torn neighborhoods. Black, Asian and Latino politicians and business leaders acknowledged that Ueberroth brings considerable financial acumen to his new post as czar of the city's "Rebuild L.A." extragovernmental task force.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | SANDRA HERNANDEZ
Shorter business hours and additional security are among the conditions the city Planning Commission was asked to impose on owners of a liquor store destroyed during last year's riots. "This area has a lot of gangs, and with the liquor store, there were always a lot of people hanging out in front of it," said Victor Castro, an employee at Alejandra's Furniture in the 4600 block of Broadway. "We know it will reopen, but we want a guard posted there to help out if there are any problems."
OPINION
June 28, 1992
In response to "Electronics Firm Gives $600,000 to Rebuild L.A.," June 18: Pioneer Electronics USA was the first company to financially participate in the program for reconstruction of Los Angeles. Pioneer is a Japanese company and it would have been appropriate to note this fact in the headline. Although this fact may be obvious to many, positive news is needed in this time of difficult U.S.-Japan relations. The only statement of Pioneer being Japanese is buried in the middle with a Ueberroth quote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1995
As we approach the two-year mark of the January, 1994, earthquake, it is appalling that reconstruction at Los Angeles public schools seems forgotten. After the disaster, school administrators and teachers, along with parents and community members, worked to secure federal, state and community funds for school repair. What has happened to these funds? At Granada Hills High School, the multipurpose room (Highlander Hall) was destroyed, and is still unsafe to enter. This auditorium is dearly missed by the school and community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1990
Fulton's cynical response is typical. It is still startling that transportation "experts" can write about Los Angeles' most visible problem without once raising the twin questions of cause and effect and of corrective measures. But it is not unexpected. Fulton is indulging in denial; he will not admit the fact that Americans have created the world's most massive welfare state, benefiting motorists and the trucking industry to the tune of hundreds of billions annually. And that the effects of these policies, our excessive dependence on automotive vehicles, have placed our nation in serious economic, environmental and societal decline.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Tom Bradley's choice of Peter V. Ueberroth to lead Los Angeles' rebuilding efforts drew divided reaction Sunday, with some questioning whether the man heralded for his organizing skills in the 1984 Olympics can effectively relate to the plight of the city's riot-torn neighborhoods. Black, Asian and Latino politicians and business leaders acknowledged that Ueberroth brings considerable financial acumen to his new post as czar of the city's "Rebuild L.A." extragovernmental task force.
NEWS
May 3, 1992
A spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency said in Washington late Saturday night that the disaster aid ordered by President Bush would enable homeowners to qualify for low-interest loans of up to $100,000 to cover uninsured losses from the disorder. Businesses would be able to qualify for loans up to $500,000 for such uninsured losses; the rate of interest would range from 4% to 8%, depending on prevailing market rates.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD and JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peter V. Ueberroth, who guided the city through one of its greatest modern triumphs--the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics--has agreed to take charge of the city's efforts to recover, materially and spiritually, from the holocaust of the past week. Flanked by Mayor Tom Bradley and Gov. Pete Wilson at a City Hall news conference Saturday, Ueberroth announced he would accept Bradley's invitation to head what the mayor's office described as an "extra-governmental task force" to rebuild the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1990 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walking through the blackened moonscape that was once the set for the movies "Dick Tracy" and "The Sting," it was difficult Tuesday for Los Angeles County Fire Capt. Bob Haskell to believe it had been only two weeks since a multimillion-dollar fire ravaged the Universal Studios back lot. "It looks so bizarre now," said Haskell, commander of the first fire unit to arrive at the Nov.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cindy Fuqua is a home wrecker. Darn proud of it too. She was at it again the other day in this posh Chicago suburb. Her long nails were painted red. Her blond hair swished down her back. And there she was, crowbar in hand, wrecking the perfectly gorgeous pine ceiling of a stranger's family room.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|