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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1999 | AGUSTIN GURZA
A name in the paper recently jolted my memory, taking me back to a time in my life long ago left behind. A time of taking chances with a new business and a new career, shedding the security of a salary just before assuming the lifelong responsibility of fatherhood. In October of 1980, I opened my own music store in East Los Angeles. The day DiscoCentro debuted, my heart skipped a few beats, a coronary alarm alerting me that I had just jumped off a cliff and it was either fly or fall.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Shelby Singleton, a maverick country music mogul and talent scout who launched the careers of Roger Miller and Ray Stevens before resuscitating the fabled Sun Records label to give new life to recordings by 1950s Sun discoveries including Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis, has died. He was 77. Singleton died Wednesday in Nashville following a battle with brain cancer. He had been admitted to St. Thomas Hospital a week earlier after suffering a seizure, his longtime friend and associate Jerry Kennedy said Thursday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1991 | ROBERT HILBURN and CHUCK PHILIPS, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic. Chuck Philips is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Don Engel, the Los Angeles attorney who is known in the record industry as the "contract-buster," says he's never seen anything like it. "I'm swamped," he says. "In the last couple of months, I've been retained by eight artists and entered discussions with about 10 others. What we're talking about here is major artists trying to break contracts." The rush to Engel--and other attorneys--followed news of the two biggest signings in record industry history: An unprecedented $40-million deal on March 12 between Janet Jackson and Virgin Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2006 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
In spite of the intense air of deja vu it generates, there is a lot to like about "Love Monkey" (perhaps not including its title), yet another comic tale of Urban Singlehood, which begins a midseason run tonight on CBS. There's scarcely a moment, group dynamic or character relationship you haven't encountered somewhere before -- indeed, CBS' own "How I Met Your Mother" is much the same show, as is ABC's "Jake in Progress."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000
Re "Music Giants Miss a Beat on the Web," July 17: Just as the railroad industry had to go very nearly bankrupt before its executives realized they were in the transportation business, the music industry will experience near bankruptcy before they realize they are not in the record business. LLOYD PETRE Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1989
How incredible to read of record people expressing apathy-bordering-on-disdain toward their own records and the radio stations playing them ("Old Records Are New Hits," in Pop Eye, by Paul Grein, May 7). Rather than label this happy discovery of old records by new audiences a fad or trend, I think it can more accurately be described as a rare triumph of records over the record business. DAVID ROSNER Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1997
Re: Steve Hochman's "Only 15 Minutes of Top 10 Fame?" (July 30). Frankly, the so-called "artists" don't even deserve that. The whole "music" score can be printed on the head of a pin. And the lyrics are a joke. The record business has been riding a high for 10 years, recycling on CD product once released on vinyl. Now that bubble has burst, and they have to deal with the gross musically mediocre swill that flows from the musically ignorant "artists" on their rosters. Popular music today has hit an all-time low. It has gone from the mediocre of rock 'n' roll to the sewer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1990
Dishonesty in the record business? How shocking! So now the flashy duo of Milli Vanilli have been caught red-handed. Sure, they looked great and danced just fine in their video and on stage, but Robert Pilatus and Fabrice Morvan sang not a note on "their" award-winning album "Girl You Know It's True." They also lip-synced their way through live concerts. And so now they have lost their 1989 Grammy for best new artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1997 | Steve Hochman
The L.A. concert promotion firm Goldenvoice rose from small punk and rock shows in the early '80s to become a powerhouse force when that music became a dominant '90s presence. Now the company is hoping to work the same magic in the record business. Goldenvoice Records is set to debut with the Oct. 28 release of "The Fury of the Aquabats," an album by the ska-rooted Huntington Beach band the Aquabats.
MAGAZINE
November 29, 1987
Regarding "A Grand Tour of L.A.'s Kingdom of Rock," by Robert Hilburn (Oct. 25): To ignore the success of our city's independent labels is to miss the real story. Enigma, Rhino, SST and others have begun to compete with the majors for sales, air play and talent; and their executives will play a pivotal role in the record business of the future. And the implication that Los Angeles is competing with New York for some sort of industry supremacy suggests that we have nothing better to do with our time.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2005 | Charles Duhigg, Times Staff Writer
Ted Cohen is an unlikely rock star. The 56-year-old computer fanatic has a high-pitched giggle and thinning gray hair. Instead of slinging a guitar over his shoulder, Cohen carries a backpack filled with nine cellphones, three iPods, two portable video players and enough wires, cables and tape to mummify Mariah Carey. At 5 feet 8 and 240 pounds, he will never be mistaken for one of the crooning waifs on MTV. But among music executives, Cohen is something of an American Idol.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2003 | Chuck Philips, Times Staff Writer
In a pairing that would alter the architecture of the music business, Apple Computer Inc. is in talks with Vivendi Universal to buy Universal Music Group, the world's largest record company, for as much as $6 billion, sources said. Such a seemingly unlikely combination would instantly make technology guru Steve Jobs, Apple's co-founder and chief executive, the most powerful player in the record industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2003 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
Mark Kates boarded a train in Philadelphia on Sunday that brought him here for the 45th annual Grammy Awards, but the journey covered far more mental terrain. He reflected on his "ultimate experience" as a music executive -- the 1996 edition of the Grammys when his artist, Beck, won two trophies and thanked Kates from the stage -- but also contemplated his current status as one of the industry's dispossessed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2002 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Rock bands have been great marketing vehicles for clothes. Now a clothing company is part of a plan to turn the tables. A new record label is being developed by associates of Costa Mesa-based Hurley International, which since its 1998 founding has been one of the top lines in the surf, skate and snowboard world and highly visible in rock on the bodies of Blink-182 and other bands. The record company is planned as a joint venture with Warner Bros.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a giant reorganization of the record industry's onetime leader, AOL Time Warner Inc. is planning to make significant cuts at Warner Music Group this week by integrating U.S. business operations and shedding hundreds of employees. The moves are an effort to transform Warner Music into a leaner conglomerate. Once the world's dominant music company, it has fallen from first to fourth place among the five biggest recording giants in U.S. sales of current albums.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000
Re "Music Giants Miss a Beat on the Web," July 17: Just as the railroad industry had to go very nearly bankrupt before its executives realized they were in the transportation business, the music industry will experience near bankruptcy before they realize they are not in the record business. LLOYD PETRE Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993
Jim Mallon and Bob Guilfoyle of Santa Barbara have submitted the following guide for their fellow readers of The Times' pop music pages, with the message "as with the Mad-Libs of our youth, we think that Robert Hilburn must write his columns from a handy template he keeps under his pillow" : (put your headline here) Who's the hottest ( noun ) in the record business? That's not an easy question, but I can spend ( large number ) words telling you. A recent Times poll I conducted with ( segment of the pop industry )
NEWS
June 15, 1989
Jay H. Lasker, a record company executive whose tenure at various companies produced some major pop music hits, has died at his Encino home after a two-year struggle with cancer. Lasker, who last served as president of Motown Records before illness forced his retirement, was 65 when he died Friday, said a spokesman for the music division of MCA. He began in the record business with Decca after Army service in World War II and was involved in the production of Bill Haley's classic, "Rock Around the Clock."
SPORTS
May 14, 2000 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tustin's Michael Cavic forgot about what was in the past, a back injury, and pushed out thoughts about the future, a possible spot in the Olympics. The present was all he had on his mind Saturday. By the time the Southern Section Division II championship meet was history, Cavic had the record he sought in the 100-yard butterfly and, as a bonus, set another in the 100 backstroke. For the last two years, Cavic, a sophomore, has chased the butterfly record of 49.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000 | GEOFF BOUCHER, Geoff Boucher is a Times staff writer
These should be the best of times for the music industry powers who churn out the youth pop that now calls the tune on the radio and at record stores. But take a closer look: Some of those same executives are smiling through clenched teeth, and there's a dejected slump in their shoulders as they push home their wheelbarrows of cash. That's because they can't believe their ears--or even plug them to block out the music coming from those CDs they sell.
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