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May 10, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
A standardized warning sticker identifying albums that contain potentially offensive lyrics is expected to begin appearing on compact discs, cassettes and vinyl records by early July. The small, black and white sticker, which was developed over the last six weeks in meetings with representatives of the nation's leading record companies, was unveiled at a press conference Wednesday in Washington.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Geffen Records announced Wednesday that it will not distribute the debut album by Houston rap group the Geto Boys because of offensive content. "The extent of which the Geto Boys album glamorizes and possibly endorses violence, racism and misogyny compels us to encourage Def American to select a distributor with a greater affinity for this musical expression," the Los Angeles-based company said in a statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Geffen Records announced Wednesday that it will not distribute the debut album by Houston rap group the Geto Boys because of offensive content. "The extent of which the Geto Boys album glamorizes and possibly endorses violence, racism and misogyny compels us to encourage Def American to select a distributor with a greater affinity for this musical expression," the Los Angeles-based company said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
A standardized warning sticker identifying albums that contain potentially offensive lyrics is expected to begin appearing on compact discs, cassettes and vinyl records by early July. The small, black and white sticker, which was developed over the last six weeks in meetings with representatives of the nation's leading record companies, was unveiled at a press conference Wednesday in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2003 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
Just leave him alone. He doesn't care, doesn't listen. The irritated voice on the song "United States of Whatever" belongs to Liam Lynch, adopting a mindless sneer for barely 90 seconds of comical punk attitude about nothing at all. A typical lyric: "This chick comes up to me, and she's all like, 'Hey aren't you that dude?' Yeah, whatever!" The song has received regular airplay on KROQ-FM (106.
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