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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
For a musician, there are probably more flattering movie roles to be offered than that of a guy who single-handedly ruins a record label with his dismal sales. Fortunately for British rocker Graham Parker, who plays such a character in the new Judd Apatow comedy "This Is 40," his decades in the music business have left him with a thick skin and a good sense of humor. In this clip from the Envelope Screening Series with The Times' Rebecca Keegan, Parker talks about his real-life reunion with his band the Rumour after 31 years and how they got involved in Apatow's film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Randy Lewis
Apple Inc. has begun pressuring the major record companies to offer new releases exclusively through its iTunes store - a move that would initially block availability on streaming services such as Spotify or Beats Music, according to several people familiar with the matter. Apple executives contend that on-demand music services have begun to cannibalize download sales, and its representatives are demanding the labels create a period reserved for digital purchasing. Music industry insiders, who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals from the industry's dominant retailer, said Apple's push for a new release window - similar to the one that some Hollywood studios impose for films newly released for home viewing - shows the Cupertino, Calif., tech giant is scrambling to retain its competitive advantage in an evolving digital music market.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The Smashing Pumpkins are suing Virgin Records, saying the record label has illegally used their name and music in pro- motional deals that hurt the band's credibility with fans. In a breach-of-contract lawsuit filed in L.A. Superior Court on Monday, the rockers said they have "worked hard for over two decades to accumulate a considerable amount of goodwill in the eyes of the public" and that Virgin's use of the band in a "Pepsi Stuff" promotion with Amazon.com and Pepsi Co. threatens their reputation for "artistic integrity."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2014 | Times staff and wire reports
Anna Gordy Gaye, the sister of the founder of Motown Records and ex-wife of musical great Marvin Gaye, with whom she wrote a number of hit songs, died of natural causes Friday at her Los Angeles home, her family said. She was 92. Gordy Gaye was an older sister of Motown founder Berry Gordy, who named a label subsidiary after her. It was for the subsidiary, Anna Records, that Marvin Gaye recorded his early work. She co-wrote a number of popular songs with Gaye, including "Baby I'm For Real," which was No. 1 for five weeks in 1969, and "The Bells," which reached No. 4, both for the R&B group the Originals.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2007 | Chris Lee
You want a CD with that latte? On Monday, Starbucks and Concord Music Group announced the formation of a joint record label, Hear Music. The label plans to sign artists and release original music via music stores and the Internet in addition to Hear Music's existing platform, Starbucks coffeehouses, by the end of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Scott Collins
So long, L.A. Reid. The music mogul announced Thursday that he won't be back for Season 3 of Fox's "The X Factor" and will instead devote his full energies to the music label he runs for Sony. The TV singing contest was created by Simon Cowell, who also serves as a judge. "Of course, I will miss the show," Reid told the Hollywood Reporter. "In my opinion Simon attracts the best talent but I'm looking forward to getting back to my core business and the responsibility of running Epic Records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2013 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
Hector Gonzalez straps a five-string bass guitar over his belly inside a music studio on a dreary stretch of Monterey Park. He plays as a smooth, prerecorded tenor joins a funky accordion through his headphones. Trying to bite a bullet, or sometimes count to 10, For the sake of argument , let's just pretend, We both agree to disagree. Gonzalez is helping a silky-voiced old bandmate record a nostalgic-sounding soul album. But in a larger sense, the 59-year-old music producer is trying to keep alive a legacy he inherited 18 years ago. Gonzalez is the head of Rampart Records, which earned a measure of fame in the 1960s as the originator of the "West Coast Eastside Sound" - and whose founder dreamed of its becoming a Mexican American Motown.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
CBS Corp. named music industry veteran Larry Jenkins to lead the company's return to the record business after an almost 20-year absence. Jenkins, 46, was appointed executive vice president and general manager of CBS Records, the New York-based company said. He will be based at the music division's West Los Angeles headquarters. Jenkins was head of marketing at Columbia Records.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Fonovisa, the Van Nuys-based record label embroiled in a payola scandal, is on the sales block, sources said. Fonovisa President Guillermo Santiso, who is expected to plead guilty soon to a payola-related felony tax count, gave a sales presentation last month in Mexico to potential buyers, sources say, that included representatives from such global music conglomerates as Seagram's Universal Music Group, Sony Music and EMI Group.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
The National Assn. of Broadcasters, seeking to prevent legislation requiring payment of new music royalties by radio stations, asked Congress to investigate the relationship between artists and labels. Association President David Rehr said in a letter to Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Valley Village) that any effort "to improve the circumstances of performers" should also look into the ties between artists and record companies. He wasn't more specific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2013 | By David Colker and David Ng
Composer John Tavener, whose works ranged from angry, dissonant cantatas to achingly beautiful choral works sung around the world during holidays, died Tuesday at his home in Child Okeford in southern England, according to his publisher, Chester Music. He was 69 and had been suffering from Marfan syndrome, a genetic disorder that contributed to his towering height - he stood 6 feet 6 inches tall - and weakened heart. Tavener first came to fame with his raucous 1968 cantata "The Whale" that was so admired by John Lennon it was released on the Beatles' Apple record label.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By August Brown
Musicians are often prone to soul-baring binges on social media, but perhaps none have gone as brutally introspective as Donald Glover did this week. The "Community" actor and MC (as Childish Gambino) uploaded a poignant series of photos to Instagram over the weekend listing his myriad doubts about himself, his future and his career. His concerns ranged from the esoteric ("I'm afraid I hate who I really am") to the prosaic ("I'm scared my girl will get pregnant at not the exact time we want")
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
The first slate of performers for the Dec. 6  Grammy Awards nominations concert includes Drake, Robin Thicke, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis and Keith Urban, who will take part in the event at the Nokia Theatre at L.A. Live. Nominations will be announced in a one-hour special on CBS: “The Grammy Nominations Concert Live - Countdown to Music's Biggest Night.” The show will be hosted again by rapper-actor LL Cool J. The awards will be presented Jan. 26 at Staples Center in downtown L.A. The push toward the 2013 Grammy Awards took another important step Wednesday, with first-round ballots being sent to the Recording Academy's roughly 12,000 voting members.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Keyboardist George Duke, one of the pioneers of the jazz fusion movement that merged jazz, rock and funk in the late 1960s and 1970s, died Monday night in Los Angeles, where he was being treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his record label announced. He was 67. In a career stretching over five decades, Duke collaborated with an array of other musicians, among them Frank Zappa, Miles Davis, Barry Manilow, Dizzy Gillespie, Al Jarreau, Don Ellis, Cannonball Adderly, Nancy Wilson and Joe Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
The controversial -- and nudity-filled -- video for Robin Thicke's " Blurred Lines " has attracted so much attention lately that one might assume it's behind the song's seven-week stint atop the Hot 100, an impressive reign that Billboard described this week as the longest so far in 2013. But "Blurred Lines" isn't just inescapable online -- it's also a fixture on the airwaves. According to a press release issued Friday by Thicke's label, Interscope Records, "Blurred Lines" has "broken the record for the highest radio audience ever recorded.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
The major Hollywood studios and record companies are drawing up a new lesson plan in their efforts to discourage students from violating copyright laws. Industry groups, which several years ago sued college students for downloading illegal copies of movies and music, are taking a gentler approach to fighting piracy by urging Los Angeles schools to steer students to legitimate websites. In a letter sent Monday to Los Angeles Unified School District Supt. John Deasy, the Motion Picture Assn.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2001 | Jeff Leeds
Major record labels and artists have agreed on a standard for paying royalties earned from cable and satellite music services. Under the pact, an artist's share of money collected from such outlets will be paid directly to the artist, instead of being paid to the record label for later distribution. That means performers would receive these royalties even if they have not paid back advances from their record companies.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1994 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Krasnow, the talent guru who masterminded the success of such acts as George Clinton, Metallica and Anita Baker, has launched a record label in association with MCA Music Entertainment Group. The 59-year-old former Elektra Entertainment chairman, who shocked the record industry last summer when he quit the label following a corporate shake-up, broke his four-month silence Thursday to announce the multimillion-dollar joint venture.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Punky apparel chain Hot Topic Inc. is getting raked over the coals by rock 'n' roll queen bee Joan Jett, whose Blackheart Records Group Inc. is accusing the clothier of ripping off the Blackheart name for a new lingerie line. Blackheart sued Hot Topic in Manhattan federal court this week, taking issue with the skull-and-crossbones-emblazoned panties and snake-print push-up bras the mall staple recently began selling under its own Blackheart label. Marketing efforts from the City of Industry-based fashion brand “were geared towards trading off the substantial goodwill associated” with Jett's New York record label, according to the suit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
California-made and -set films often turn up at LAFF. Among this year's standouts: "Fruitvale Station" This feature debut from writer-director Ryan Coogler is a gripping drama drawn from the real-life incident in which a 22-year-old man was killed by transit police in an Oakland train station on New Year's Day 2009. Starring Michael B. Jordan in a stirring turn, the film finds dramatic tension in the struggles of the everyday and builds to the tragedy of a life cut short. Having won major prizes at Sundance this year and with the Weinstein Co. now behind it, "Fruitvale Station" should remain in the conversation for months to come.
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