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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Armand Kaproff, 85, principal cellist for many of Hollywood's top movie composers and record producers, died Sunday of age-related illnesses at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The Brooklyn-born Kaproff, who studied cello under Joseph Schuster, established himself as a prominent classical musician working with the NBC Orchestra under conductors Arturo Toscanini and Leopold Stokowski, and under Bernard Hermann with the CBS Symphony.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
That Phil Ramone was a musical force in the recording studio is undeniable, and the evidence lies in the range of his accomplishments. For example, within one three-year period in the early 1960s, Ramone mixed Lesley Gore's smash hit "It's My Party," recorded Marilyn Monroe seducing President John F. Kennedy in song on his birthday and engineered essential double-quartet recordings by jazz innovators Ornette Coleman and Eric Dolphy. Ramone, who died Saturday in his late 70s or early 80s, depending on sources, would have been only around 30 at the time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1988 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Hal Willner rolled his eyes wearily as a magazine photographer asked him to pose with a set of Mickey Mouse ears. It's not that Willner has any aversion to American kitsch--over lunch earlier he discoursed at length about Jerry Lewis' most embarrassing moments on his annual telethons. This particular bit of kitsch, though, cuts him a little close.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Phil Ramone, the veteran record producer whose work with A-list artists including Barbra Streisand, Bob Dylan and Paul Simon made him one of the most respected figures in the music industry, died Saturday at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Billboard reported. He was 79. Ramone was hospitalized last month following an aortic aneurysm. Born in South Africa, Ramone studied classical violin at New York's Juilliard School before moving behind the board. His extensive credits include Dylan's "Blood on the Tracks," Billy Joel's "52nd Street" and Paul Simon's "Still Crazy After All These Years," for which he shared the Grammy Award for album of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN
Heads turn as the large, imposing man with the long, unkempt hair and beard steps from a car just before midnight on a seedy stretch of Hollywood Boulevard. The dozen or so people loitering around the entrance of a decaying building don't appear the types to be easily intimidated. They're mostly men in their 20s who look at the world with expressionless gazes--the epitome of L.A. street cool. But they clear a path for this visitor and whisper anxiously to each other as he walks past them into the building, which houses rows of ragged, low-budget rock 'n' roll rehearsal rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1989 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
When record producers venture out of the control room and start performing themselves, the results are generally disappointing. Take Jerry Fuller. In the late 1960s, his fine-tuning of Gary Puckett and the Union Gap's rock 'n' roll balladry set the national pop charts ablaze. But Fuller's own assault on the charts a decade later created nary a spark. Or Kim Fowley. In the 1970s, he did some neat things with the Byrds, Steppenwolf, Helen Reddy and the Runaways.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2000 | GEOFF BOUCHER, Geoff Boucher is a Times staff writer
At first, the bundles of fan letters that arrived at Max Martin's recording studio in Stockholm contained only proxy valentines--"Please tell Britney I love her," they would implore, or "Can you ask A.J. to marry me?"--which is pretty much what you would expect in the mailbox of a producer who works with froth-pop stars Britney Spears and the Backstreet Boys. But a few months ago a new theme appeared among the airmailed envelopes.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talks between international record producers and Thailand's pirate tape industry have failed to turn up a compromise formula for ending the large-scale illegal copying of records. "We couldn't reach an agreement," said Giouw Jui Chian, Southeast Asian regional director of the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, which represents American and other Western record companies.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1986 | PAUL GREIN
The team of Ned Shankman and Ron DeBlasio has managed record producer David Foster since the mid-'70s, and now they also handle Dennis Lambert, Jay Graydon and 10 other producers. Michael Lippman has represented Ron Nevison since he launched his management company seven years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN
*** / Latin Playboys, "Dose," Atlantic. The Los Lobos offshoot opens its second album with "Fiesta Erotica," a world-industrial-ethno-techno-orchestral instrumental that pits power-tool whoosh and whirl against clacking techno drums and a bagpipe-like melody line. It's a fittingly mind-altering portal to the Latin Playboys' world, a musical dream state grounded in earthy reality, a series of realistic vignettes with a surreal spin.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Are you planning to watch HBO's "Phil Spector"? Then step into my cubicle. We need to talk. I'm just a reporter, so my opinions about film aesthetics don't add up to much, but as one of the only journalists to cover both of Spector's murder trials, I can tell you that this movie, which premieres Sunday, is a bomb factually. And in an era when millions depend on "The Daily Show" for their news and best picture nominees for their history lessons, that scares me. Most viewers will know very little about the Spector case, and when the program is over, their understanding will be deeply flawed.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Record producer Terry Lewis and his wife, Indira, have sold their ocean-view house in Malibu for $3.735 million. The one-acre estate includes a Spanish-style house, a sports court, a swimming pool with a spa, and gardens. The 6,710-square-foot open-plan home, built in 2001, features a media room, five bedrooms and 51/2 bathrooms. Lewis is part of a songwriting and production team with Jimmy Jam. The Grammy-winning Jam and Lewis have produced hits for singers including Janet Jackson, Boyz II Men and Mariah Carey.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Record producer David Anderle has sold his home in the Hollywood Hills West area for $3.7 million. The Spanish-style villa, built in 1925, was once used as a speak-easy. Features include decorative tile work, beamed ceilings, a wine cellar and an artist's studio. The three-bedroom, 31/2-bathroom house contains 3,813 square feet of living space and sits on a third of an acre. The former A&M Records executive produced songs for Rita Coolidge, Kris Kristofferson and the Circle Jerks, among others.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Record producer Ralph Sall has listed his Sunset Strip-area house at $2.95 million. The remodeled Spanish-style house, built in 1926, features iron work, interior archways, French doors, balconies and an updated kitchen. The close to 3,300 square feet of living space includes five bedrooms and 41/2 bathrooms in the main house and an attached guesthouse. Extensive decks and patios, a loggia and a saltwater swimming pool complete the grounds. Sall is president of Bulletproof Entertainment.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Time
Record producer David Anderle has listed his longtime Hollywood Hills home for sale at $4.75 million. Built in the 1920s, the Spanish-style villa was once a speak-easy. Details include decorative tile work and beamed ceilings. The three-bedroom, four-bathroom house contains 3,813 square feet of living space and sits on a third of an acre. The former A&M Records executive produced songs for Rita Coolidge, Kris Kristofferson and the Circle Jerks, among others. He worked with Brian Wilson to help him form Brother Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2011 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
This year, the Producers Guild of America could just rename its annual award show after Scott Rudin. For Rudin's two nominations Tuesday morning, for "The Social Network" and "True Grit," landed the producer in the record books for being the first person nominated by the guild twice in one year. Not only that, his achievement also coincides with the guild's previously planned presentation to Rudin of the esteemed David O. Selznick award. "I find the whole thing rather humbling," said an obviously delighted Rudin, who did have two pictures in the running in 2008, with "No Country for Old Men" and " There Will Be Blood," but since he was an executive producer on "Blood," he was not given the same level of credit.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Byrds, the Los Angeles band whose 1965 recording of "Mr. Tambourine Man" ignited the folk-rock movement, and Ike & Tina Turner, whose soul revue was among the most dynamic live acts ever in pop, are among the seven new inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1996 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Glen Ballard, one of the hottest record producers in the music business, is a technology junkie, the kind of guy who buys the first model of a new product off the assembly line a year before the price goes down and the bugs are worked out. But there's only one piece of hardware that he always packs in its special case and takes to every recording session: the espresso machine that he's now operating in the kitchen of his weekend house in Malibu. The device carries a little symbolism.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Whatever the theme song to Phil Spector's troubled life and times might be, "To Know Him Is to Love Him" probably isn't it. That, as Spector fans know, is the title of the legendary record producer's first hit, recorded by the Teddy Bears in 1958 with words taken from the epitaph on his father's tombstone. Spector went on to produce hits almost without number, including "Be My Baby," "He's a Rebel," "Da Doo Ron Ron" and "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling. " Today, however, the man Sean Lennon called "the genius geniuses come to" is in prison serving 19 years to life after the jury in a second trial convicted him of the Alhambra murder of actress Lana Clarkson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2009 | Kimi Yoshino
The doors to the Forum in Inglewood opened Tuesday to a massive mobile hospital, the largest and longest-running free clinic ever attempted in the 25-year history of Remote Area Medical Foundation, a Tennessee-based nonprofit more accustomed to serving rural America. Each day since, more than 750 patients have been served, many waiting for hours and some sleeping overnight in their cars for a chance at a free exam. In the first three days of the clinic's eight-day run, the foundation provided 1,640 fillings, performed 706 tooth extractions and 141 mammograms and doled out more than 550 eyeglasses.
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