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Recording Artists Coalition

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November 14, 2001 | Jeff Leeds
The Recording Artists Coalition, a trade group co-founded by former Eagles singer-songwriter Don Henley, has filed court papers asking a federal judge to not declare that musicians' songs are "works for hire." The brief from the coalition was submitted Nov. 7 to Judge Marilyn Hall Patel in U.S. District Court in San Francisco. Patel is overseeing the suit in which the record companies are seeking to have Napster Inc. found liable for allowing unauthorized swapping of online music files.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2003 | Randy Lewis
The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences is aiming to add its weight to efforts advancing musicians' rights with a new policy initiative and plans for a series of round-table meetings to address artists' con- cerns about the business side of music. "As an organization representing thousands of recording professionals, we have an obligation to help create an environment where they can grow creatively and thrive professionally," academy President Neil Portnow said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2003 | Randy Lewis
The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences is aiming to add its weight to efforts advancing musicians' rights with a new policy initiative and plans for a series of round-table meetings to address artists' con- cerns about the business side of music. "As an organization representing thousands of recording professionals, we have an obligation to help create an environment where they can grow creatively and thrive professionally," academy President Neil Portnow said.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2002 | Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer
Rock star Don Henley has become an outspoken advocate for musicians' rights, complaining loudly and often about greedy music labels that allegedly shortchange bands out of their royalties. "Record companies have been screwing artists for ages," he said in an interview last year. "It's time we organize and fight back." But now, in a little-noticed court case bubbling through the system, the 55-year-old Henley finds himself accused of essentially the same unfair practices by one of his own former bandmates.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2002 | Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer
Rock star Don Henley has become an outspoken advocate for musicians' rights, complaining loudly and often about greedy music labels that allegedly shortchange bands out of their royalties. "Record companies have been screwing artists for ages," he said in an interview last year. "It's time we organize and fight back." But now, in a little-noticed court case bubbling through the system, the 55-year-old Henley finds himself accused of essentially the same unfair practices by one of his own former bandmates.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2002
The four-pronged Concert for Artists' Rights to be staged across Los Angeles County on Tuesday night has come about because of complex legislative issues facing the musicians and the music industry, but the basic reason for the star-studded shows couldn't be simpler: "We need a phone," says Jim Guerinot, manager of the Offspring, No Doubt and Beck, and one of the key organizers of the pre-Grammy night event. "Right now we don't have one.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2001 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Courtney Love, Don Henley and other musicians descended on the Capitol on Wednesday and said a state law governing their contracts with record companies locks them into "indentured servitude." Addressing a panel of legislators, the artists said they are unfairly exempted from a section of the labor code that protects entertainers from being tied to one company for more than seven years.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2002 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four powerful labor organizations will enter the artist rights fray this week, supporting state legislation that could open the door to free agency for recording acts.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2001 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cadre of popular musicians led by Elton John, the Eagles and the Dixie Chicks is banding together to put on an extraordinary production: five benefit concerts in the Los Angeles area on one night in February. But, instead of raising money for charity, the artists are taking the stage to finance their ongoing battle against the record industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2002
Does absence make the heart grow fonder, or just make fans forget? That's the question Sheryl Crow will get an answer to this week when SoundScan's first-week sales figures show up for her "C'mon, C'mon" album. It's been four years since her previous studio album, "The Globe Sessions"--a couple of lifetimes in terms of the pop music world's ever-accelerating churn rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2002
The four-pronged Concert for Artists' Rights to be staged across Los Angeles County on Tuesday night has come about because of complex legislative issues facing the musicians and the music industry, but the basic reason for the star-studded shows couldn't be simpler: "We need a phone," says Jim Guerinot, manager of the Offspring, No Doubt and Beck, and one of the key organizers of the pre-Grammy night event. "Right now we don't have one.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2002 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four powerful labor organizations will enter the artist rights fray this week, supporting state legislation that could open the door to free agency for recording acts.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2001 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cadre of popular musicians led by Elton John, the Eagles and the Dixie Chicks is banding together to put on an extraordinary production: five benefit concerts in the Los Angeles area on one night in February. But, instead of raising money for charity, the artists are taking the stage to finance their ongoing battle against the record industry.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2001 | Jeff Leeds
The Recording Artists Coalition, a trade group co-founded by former Eagles singer-songwriter Don Henley, has filed court papers asking a federal judge to not declare that musicians' songs are "works for hire." The brief from the coalition was submitted Nov. 7 to Judge Marilyn Hall Patel in U.S. District Court in San Francisco. Patel is overseeing the suit in which the record companies are seeking to have Napster Inc. found liable for allowing unauthorized swapping of online music files.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2001 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Courtney Love, Don Henley and other musicians descended on the Capitol on Wednesday and said a state law governing their contracts with record companies locks them into "indentured servitude." Addressing a panel of legislators, the artists said they are unfairly exempted from a section of the labor code that protects entertainers from being tied to one company for more than seven years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
The Recording Academy will pump up the volume in Washington by joining a political duet. Best known for handing out the Grammy Awards, the academy stepped up its political pursuits a notch with the Wednesday announcement of an alliance with the Recording Artists' Coalition, a high-profile legislative advocacy effort founded by Don Henley and Sheryl Crow in 2000. The coalition has been a force on musician rights issues such as contract laws and trademark issues, and its elite membership of 150 recording artists includes Bruce Springsteen, Madonna, Elton John and Tom Petty.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2002 | GLENN GAMBOA, NEWSDAY
Dear Rev. Al and Johnnie C., Don't play the race card. You guys are on the verge of something big with this music- industry reform thing. You have the chance to become major players on this issue, especially if you continue the partnership with the Recording Artists Coalition and the growing number of musician-friendly legislators looking to overturn the ailing industry. But you'll mess it up if you claim racism is the industry's main problem.
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