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Recording Equipment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty, according to records and interviews. An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
The Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday called for a public hearing to question LAPD officials about patrol officers who tampered with voice recording equipment in patrol cars. Commissioner Robert Saltzman said he wanted to hear from senior police staff about how the case was handled and the decision not to investigate to find out which officers were responsible for the deception. He said he also wanted an explanation for why the department failed to immediately notify the commission when the vandalized equipment was discovered.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1988 | DOUG BROWN, Times Staff Writer
Four gunmen entered a Costa Mesa recording studio, handcuffed 14 employees and their guests, and left with more than $100,000 in sound equipment, police and one of the victims said Saturday. The robbers spent nearly two hours Friday night taking wallets, rings and the sophisticated recording equipment, police said. When they left Front Page Productions in the 200 block of Avocado Street, the robbers reminded the victims that they had their drivers' licenses and addresses, a victim said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | Steve Lopez
In Los Angeles, patrol officers are caught disabling recording equipment that was in place to keep them honest. In Santa Monica, a high school student demonstrates why the wrestling coach is the last faculty member to mess with. And in Glendale, a young woman challenges the definition of "hands-free" driving after getting a ticket for talking on a phone tucked into her head scarf. These three police blotter tales have little in common, except that I've assembled them in a nice spring bouquet, along with a prickly observation or two. First the LAPD.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1987
Six men posing as a musical group held a studio engineer at gunpoint in Kearny Mesa while they stole nearly $250,000 worth of recording equipment Thursday, police said. The engineer was shackled in a bathroom in MixMasters Recording Studio, 4877 Mercury St., while the men took microphones, amplifiers, tape machines, and a half-ton, nine-foot-wide recording console, said Garth Hedin, the manager of the studio. "They have enough equipment to set up a real nice studio," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1989 | DON SNOWDEN
G uitarist Leo Nocentelli, pictured above, vividly remembers his first exposure to sampling in 1982. "I was on a session and the guy pressed one note on the keyboard and it made 'Whooaahh! Good God!' like James Brown," recalled Nocentelli, who made his mark with the New Orleans funk group the Meters in the early '70s. "It blew me away. It was James Brown's voice by the press of a finger and I saw the trouble in that."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
The gulf between the sound you hear in a first-rate cinema and the sound you hear at home from a videocassette or a laser disc is as between night and day, or at very least late dusk and day. Where is the sense that you are in the middle of the sound, or that a jet is roaring past your left shoulder, or just that not all the talkers are clustered in the center of the room?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1997 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Locked in an attic for decades, the battered blond staring up at Kelly McIntyre would probably have quite a story to tell if only she could talk. Soon, she will. McIntyre lays her gently on his workbench and skillfully uses a knife and a small hammer to open her stomach. He replaces a rubbery organ--and a few moments later she speaks. "I'm hungry," says Chatty Cathy, finally breaking her long silence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
When Anaheim Hills computer entrepreneur David A. Brown placed a collect call from jail to an ex-inmate on the morning of Feb. 13, he got the news he seemed to have been awaiting for weeks. "David, it's done!" an excited Richard Steinhart told Brown in one of their several dozen telephone conversations in early February. "Bang, bang--right in the back of the head," Steinhart said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | Steve Lopez
In Los Angeles, patrol officers are caught disabling recording equipment that was in place to keep them honest. In Santa Monica, a high school student demonstrates why the wrestling coach is the last faculty member to mess with. And in Glendale, a young woman challenges the definition of "hands-free" driving after getting a ticket for talking on a phone tucked into her head scarf. These three police blotter tales have little in common, except that I've assembled them in a nice spring bouquet, along with a prickly observation or two. First the LAPD.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty, according to records and interviews. An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
High-spirited, emotional and funny, "Sound City" is, of all things, a mash note to a machine. Not just any machine, however, but one that helped change the face of rock 'n' roll. That piece of equipment, the Neve 8028 sound board, was the crown jewel of Sound City in Van Nuys, a complete dump of a recording studio whose unkempt ambience and warehouse complex location didn't stop it from turning out more than 100 gold and platinum records, including epochal work by Neil Young, Tom Petty, Pat Benatar, Cheap Trick, Rage Against the Machine, Fleetwood Mac and Nine Inch Nails.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2007 | From Reuters
Digital video recorder maker TiVo Inc. on Wednesday posted a loss that reflected an inventory write-off made necessary by the rapid shift by retailers to sell newer, high-definition recorders. TiVo shares fell more than 4% after hours. Its net loss for its fiscal second quarter ended July 31 was $17.7 million, or 18 cents a share, compared with the year-earlier quarter's loss of $6.4 million, or 7 cents. The latest quarter's loss included an inventory write-down charge of $11.2 million.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Insurance companies would be barred from using data from vehicles' "black boxes" to set drivers' rates under legislation that won final approval in the Legislature. The bill now goes to Republican Gov. John Hoeven, who is expected to sign it. Insurance industry groups said they believed that North Dakota was the first state to bar the use of the black box information to set insurance rates. The legislation is aimed at computer chips that record a car's speed, braking and steering efficiency.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The black boxes that help determine the causes of airliner crashes will have to hold more data and be more reliable, the Federal Aviation Administration said. The new rules require cockpit voice recorders, which record conversations, to retain at least two hours of audio and have a 10-minute backup power source. They had been required to record 15 to 30 minutes of sound and had no backup power.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2004 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Short of an actual prize, one of the most coveted handouts at this year's Grammy Awards, Academy Awards and MTV Video Music Awards was the iPod music player stashed in celebrity goody bags. The bags are sometimes filled with specific recipients in mind. Pamela Anderson reportedly doesn't get fur and Alicia Keys, who has spoken publicly against the illegal trade in diamonds, isn't given any of those. Bono, of the band U2, does get sunglasses, of which he is fond.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark accord that should open the floodgates to a wave of new music-recording technologies, electronics manufacturers have agreed to pay royalties to the music industry on the sale of all digital home-recording equipment. The agreement, which will be formally announced today and requires congressional approval, will end a battle that began four years ago with the advent of digital audiotape (DAT) technology.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Michael P. Schulhof is feeling embattled, he certainly didn't show it one recent morning as he descended from a plush Sony Corp. helicopter, tanned and smiling after a weekend at the beach. Schulhof, as head of Sony Software, the highest-ranking American at the giant Japanese electronics company, was bound for London on the Concorde. From there, he would pilot a Sony jet to Austria for the inauguration of a videodisc factory.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2004 | From Associated Press
In a major strategic reversal, Sony Corp. said it planned to add support for MP3 music files to some of its portable music players. The shift to support the widely used MP3 music format would end Sony's long-standing insistence on its proprietary format called Atrac and better position the electronics giant against rivals such as Apple Computer Inc., whose portable players support both MP3s and other file formats.
WORLD
March 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Nations acknowledged that an aircraft recording device possibly linked to an air crash blamed for triggering the 1994 genocide in Rwanda had turned up in a U.N. filing cabinet. The Paris daily Le Monde had reported that a recorder from the Falcon 50 shot down by a rocket April 6, 1994, killing the presidents of Rwanda and Burundi, had been sent to the U.N. and never seen again.
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