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BUSINESS
July 24, 2002 | Associated Press
The recording industry came under attack for accounting practices that, according to artists, routinely underreport royalties, cheating them out of millions of dollars. The allegations were made during a state Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Sacramento. Among those addressing the committee was Los Angeles music attorney Don Engel, who estimated that record companies routinely "underpay 10% to 40% on every royalty" and dare artists to challenge it without committing "artistic suicide."
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BUSINESS
March 8, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Lucian Grainge has a vision for the future of the music business that bears scant resemblance to the traditional record company playbook. He is putting songs on smartphones in Africa, reviving moribund American record labels and making Lorde into a Grammy-winning global sensation. Above all, he wants to forge new partnerships with his industry's erstwhile adversaries - the technology firms that have upended the way people get their music. Skeptics question whether anyone can reverse the decline of an industry that has seen global sales plummet from $28 billion in 1999 to $16.5 billion in 2012.
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BUSINESS
May 7, 2003 | Jeff Leeds
A bill designed to provide recording artists with more leverage in contract talks passed a key legislative hurdle, winning approval from the state Senate Judiciary Committee. The bill would make it a "fiduciary duty" for record labels to accurately calculate royalty earnings owed to artists. The legislation sponsored by Sen. Kevin Murray (D-Culver City) is one of a series of measures that could toughen penalties for labels that underpay or cheat artists out of royalties.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Twitter Inc. says its new music service helps users discover songs and artists. But the music industry isn't sure it's something to sing about just yet. The #Music app recommends songs based on the artists Twitter users follow. It also shows what tracks friends are tweeting about. And it lets users browse songs that are popular or up-and-coming on the service. The user can preview the tracks from iTunes or subscribe to Spotify or Rdio to listen to full-length versions of the suggested songs.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1991 | ALAN CITRON
While other retailers were singing the blues last year, the record industry was enjoying its best sales ever, according to a Recording Industry Assn. of America report. Sales volume in 1990 rose 14.6% to $7.5 billion based on the suggested list price, compared to $6.5 billion in 1989. Shipments rose 7.3%, with 865.7 million units shipped, against 806.7 million units the year before, the RIAA reported. Industry sources attributed the growth largely to compact disc sales, which rose 38.
NEWS
April 15, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James B. Conkling, former director of the Voice of America and a recording executive who helped create the Grammy awards in music, has died. He was 83. Conkling, who was former president of Columbia Records and founding president of Warner Bros. Records, died Sunday at Sutter Oaks Alzheimer's Hospital in Sacramento. His family said he had suffered from the disease for several years. President Ronald Reagan appointed Conkling to head Voice of America in June 1981.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2004 | Walter Hamilton and Chuck Philips, Times Staff Writer
New York Atty. Gen. Eliot Spitzer's office is investigating whether the nation's largest record companies are skirting payola laws by hiring middlemen to influence which songs are heard on the public airwaves. Spitzer's office served subpoenas last month on Sony BMG Music Entertainment, Universal Music Group, EMI Group and Warner Music Group, seeking copies of all e-mails, letters, contracts and other correspondence between the firms and the industry's leading independent promoters.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2005 | From Reuters
The recording industry filed its latest round of copyright infringement lawsuits, targeting 754 people it claims used online file-sharing networks to illegally trade in songs. The lawsuits were filed in federal district courts across the country, including California, Colorado, Georgia, Missouri, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington, D.C. Record companies have filed more than 14,000 such lawsuits since September 2003.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1999 | Bloomberg News
The recording industry lost a legal bid to extract higher royalties out of three firms that transmit digital music through satellites and cable lines. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia upheld a royalty formula established by the Library of Congress for three digital audio subscription services, Digital Music Express, Digital Cable Radio Associates and Muzak. The recording industry had sought to increase the 6.5% rate the library established last year for the services.
NEWS
October 16, 1993
Ellen Cohn, 35, an executive in the jazz recording industry. A native of St. Louis, Ms. Cohn had served as vice president of the Chase Music Group record label and general manager of MAMA, which packaged collections of traditional jazz music. She helped to record and publicize such artists as band leader Bob Florence, pianist Terry Trotter and singer Mark Winkler. An influential spokeswoman for jazz, Ms.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2012 | Gavin Edwards
Some highlights of a Friday-morning walking tour of Sub Pop's spacious third-floor office in downtown Seattle: A "wood record" award for the Shins, commemorating sales of 100,000 copies of "Chutes Too Narrow. " A soda machine in the lunch room stocked with Rainier beer. A framed chunk of plaster from Sub Pop's first office where Kurt Cobain wrote his name and address on the wall so the record label would always know where to send his checks. Sub Pop was founded 23 years ago by Bruce Pavitt and Jonathan Poneman with the goal of documenting the blossoming Seattle rock scene.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Frustrated for years by rampant piracy, the recording industry is pushing California's lawmakers to approve legislation that would allow warrantless searches of companies that press copies of compact discs and DVDs. The Recording Industry Assn. of America, in effect, wants to give law enforcement officials the power to enter manufacturing plants without notice or court orders to check that discs are legitimate and carry legally required identification marks. The proposal by state Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2011 | Valerie J. Nelson
Dot Records founder Randy Wood was looking for a song for a young Pat Boone to record in 1955 and found it in the Fats Domino hit "Ain't That a Shame?" Except Boone, then an English major, wanted to sing "Isn't That a Shame?" After a few run-throughs, Wood insisted, "It's got to be 'ain't'," and Boone soon had his first No. 1 single. Wood's practice of having white singers such as Boone cover rhythm and blues hits by black artists is credited by some with helping black musicians -- and early rock music -- break into the commercial mainstream.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher
One in a series of occasional articles The Troubadour, awash on a recent night in indigo light and chiming guitars, doesn't look all that different than it did in the 1970s, when music history plugged in to the club's stage amps and earned the tiny West Hollywood venue the audacity to relentlessly advertise itself as "the world-famous Troubadour." The description still fits but, well, the world isn't as big as it used to be, not for the recording industry or the young musicians who come to Los Angeles with dreams of gold and platinum.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2009 | By Geoff Boucher
On Wednesday night at the "Grammy Nominations Concert Live," the biggest stars were seated at two dozen tables that were covered with ivory tablecloths, sprinkled with gold confetti and anchored by a gleaming champagne bucket. But if you looked closely, every one of those buckets was filled with a room-temperature bottle of Martinelli's apple cider instead of chilled Cristal. It was a fitting choice. These are sobering times for the recording industry and for this fledgling broadcast franchise, which was still finding its feet in its second year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2009 | Greg Braxton
Whitney Houston did not have to sing a note Thursday night to spark a rousing ovation from a crowd of celebrities and record-industry heavyweights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Stanley M. Gortikov, a former head of Capitol Records who served as president of the Recording Industry Assn. of America during a time when record companies, responding to outside pressure, agreed to print warning labels on rock albums containing explicit or suggestive lyrics, has died. He was 85. Gortikov, who died of natural causes Thursday at his home in Brentwood, served as president of the Recording Industry Assn. of America, the industry's main trade organization, from 1972 to 1987.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2001 | From Reuters
Aimster, an Internet file-swapping service that piggybacks on America Online's and other instant messaging services, said Wednesday that it filed suit against a recording industry trade group it says is trying to shut it down. The suit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of New York, is asking the federal court for a declaratory judgment that the company is not infringing on copyrights.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2009 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
Blue Microphones got its start building high-end studio microphones for the recording industry, making a name for itself as a niche player. But niche no more. With a nudge from Apple Inc., the Westlake Village company built a low-cost microphone for use with music recording software. That mic, called the Snowball, has become a hit with aspiring pro musicians and dedicated hobbyists who make demo recordings on their laptops instead of shelling out $50 an hour or more for studio time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2009 | Harriet Ryan
Brushing aside character references from an array of Swedish pop musicians, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge refused Friday to lower the $1-million bail for a hip-hop artist accused of killing a jazz pianist in a Hollywood crosswalk. Judge Monica Bachner said she had reviewed 21 letters submitted on behalf of David Jassy, including a dozen from friends in the recording industry, but found no "unusual circumstances" to change his bail. She said Jassy's Swedish citizenship made him a flight risk as did his foreign family ties, which include an 11-year-old son in Sweden, a brother in Italy and other relatives in Gambia.
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