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ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
A standardized warning sticker identifying albums that contain potentially offensive lyrics is expected to begin appearing on compact discs, cassettes and vinyl records by early July. The small, black and white sticker, which was developed over the last six weeks in meetings with representatives of the nation's leading record companies, was unveiled at a press conference Wednesday in Washington.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2007 | Randy Lewis
Garth Brooks officially is the bestselling solo act in U.S. music history. Again. Brooks collected his latest hunka-hunka precious metal Monday from the Recording Industry Assn. of America, certifying total album sales of 123 million copies, allowing him to surpass Elvis Presley to reclaim the No. 2 slot. The Beatles have long been No. 1 on the RIAA's ranking of U.S. album sales, currently showing sales of 170 million and counting, but the No. 2 position has shifted over time.
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BUSINESS
November 29, 2001 | Dave Wilson
A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit by a Princeton University computer scientist who claimed that legal threats from the music industry prevented him from discussing security problems for digital music distribution. Judge Garrett Brown of the Federal District Court in Trenton, N.J., ignored arguments from professor Edward Felten that the music industry violated his 1st Amendment rights to free speech. The Recording Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2007 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
The recording industry on Thursday won the largest judgment so far against consumers who illegally download music over the Internet when a federal jury ordered a 30-year-old Minnesota woman to pay $222,000 for copyright infringement. The victory could embolden the industry in its four-year legal campaign against piracy at a time when illegal sharing of music online is exploding and dramatically reducing music sales. The decision by the jury in a federal district court in Duluth, Minn.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
A federal magistrate has ruled that two North Carolina universities do not have to reveal the identities of two students accused of sharing copyrighted music on the Internet. The Recording Industry Assn. of America filed subpoenas in November 2003 asking for help identifying two students who allegedly file-swapped songs using the universities' computer systems. Both schools initially were willing to cooperate but later joined attorneys for the students in opposing the request.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
The Recording Industry Assn. of America, a trade group that represents the U.S. recording industry, filed lawsuits against 754 individuals, accusing them of distributing copyrighted music on the Internet. The organization said it had filed the cases in federal courts across the U.S., and that 40 of the targeted individuals used networks at academic institutions, including Columbia University, Michigan State University and UC Berkeley, to illegally share music files.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2002 | JON HEALEY and JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a strategic shift, the major record labels want to expand their fight against online piracy by going after people who use file-sharing networks to copy songs for free. The problem is, they don't know who those people are. And Internet service providers, which do know, don't want to tell. A federal judge in Washington on Friday began deliberating how hard it will be for the labels to ferret out the identity of Internet users accused of violating copyrights.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2007 | Randy Lewis
Garth Brooks officially is the bestselling solo act in U.S. music history. Again. Brooks collected his latest hunka-hunka precious metal Monday from the Recording Industry Assn. of America, certifying total album sales of 123 million copies, allowing him to surpass Elvis Presley to reclaim the No. 2 slot. The Beatles have long been No. 1 on the RIAA's ranking of U.S. album sales, currently showing sales of 170 million and counting, but the No. 2 position has shifted over time.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Recording Industry Assn. of America filed evidence late Monday supporting its motion against Napster Inc., and asked the U.S. District Court judge in San Francisco to shut down the popular online song-swapping service. The trade group, along with the National Music Publishers Assn., also submitted an industry-financed study that claims record sales have plummeted at music stores near college campuses with high-speed Internet connections.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hilary Rosen is under siege. The chief of the Recording Industry Assn. of America, the trade group representing the nation's five largest music conglomerates, lately has been taking body blows from both angry rock stars and Internet geeks in the battle over the future of the $40-billion business. Rosen and the RIAA have filed multimillion-dollar lawsuits against MP3.com and Napster Inc.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
With CD sales tumbling, record companies and musicians are looking at a new potential pot of money: royalties from broadcast radio stations. For years, stations have paid royalties to composers and publishers when they played their songs. But they enjoy a federal exemption when paying the performers and record labels because, they argue, the airplay sells music. Now, the Recording Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
The music industry Wednesday expanded its crackdown on illegal on-campus file-sharing to Columbia University, Dartmouth College and 21 other schools, demanding students pay as much as $5,000 to head off lawsuits. The Recording Industry Assn. of America mailed 405 "pre-litigation letters" in the second wave of its latest campus anti-piracy campaign, the organization said. Boston University received 50, the most of any school in this round of mailings.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
The Recording Industry Assn. of America, a trade group that represents the U.S. recording industry, filed lawsuits against 754 individuals, accusing them of distributing copyrighted music on the Internet. The organization said it had filed the cases in federal courts across the U.S., and that 40 of the targeted individuals used networks at academic institutions, including Columbia University, Michigan State University and UC Berkeley, to illegally share music files.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
A federal magistrate has ruled that two North Carolina universities do not have to reveal the identities of two students accused of sharing copyrighted music on the Internet. The Recording Industry Assn. of America filed subpoenas in November 2003 asking for help identifying two students who allegedly file-swapped songs using the universities' computer systems. Both schools initially were willing to cooperate but later joined attorneys for the students in opposing the request.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2005 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
The major Hollywood studios and record companies have a new lesson for college students: The faster you download movies and music, the sooner you may end up in a courtroom. Leaders of the Recording Industry Assn. of America and the Motion Picture Assn. of America said Tuesday that they expected to file hundreds of lawsuits today against students across the country who use a super-fast version of the Internet that connects more than 300 universities and other institutions.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2004 | Jon Healey
A Woodland Hills company that helps sell music, movies and video games through file-sharing networks sued the Recording Industry Assn. of America and three anti-piracy contractors, accusing them of violating two patents it controls. In a suit filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, Brilliant Digital Entertainment Inc. and its Altnet subsidiary alleged that the patents had been violated each time record-company contractors flooded the networks with bogus versions of songs.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2004 | From Reuters
A U.S. music industry trade group said it sued 482 more people for copyright infringement in a continuation of its anti-piracy campaign. Including the latest suits, the Recording Industry Assn. of America has sued 3,429 individuals since September as it seeks to discourage music fans from copying and trading songs through peer-to-peer networks like Kazaa and LimeWire.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
The music industry's trade group has dropped a program that offered to spare individuals from being sued by recording companies if they admitted to illegally sharing music online, courts documents show. The Recording Industry Assn. of America said it no longer deems the program useful because it considers the public educated or aware enough now to know that they could be sued for file sharing.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2004 | From Reuters
A U.S. music industry trade group said it sued 482 more people for copyright infringement in a continuation of its anti-piracy campaign. Including the latest suits, the Recording Industry Assn. of America has sued 3,429 individuals since September as it seeks to discourage music fans from copying and trading songs through peer-to-peer networks like Kazaa and LimeWire.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2004 | From Reuters
A U.S. music industry group said it had sued 493 more people over copyright infringement as part of its campaign to stop consumers from copying music over the Internet. The Recording Industry Assn. of America has now sued 2,947 individuals since September in an attempt to discourage people from copying songs through "peer to peer" networks such as Kazaa. The trade group, which represents the five largest recording companies, has settled 486 of those cases for about $3,000 each.
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