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Recording Industry Contracts

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NEWS
January 12, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pop diva Janet Jackson is expected to sign a four-album contract today with Virgin Records worth an estimated $80 million--an unprecedented fee that analysts say could set the stage for another round of music industry mega-deals. The pact is the biggest ever awarded, surpassing the $60-million mark shared by such superstars as Michael Jackson and Madonna, whose six-album deals included film and joint-venture record label components.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pop diva Mariah Carey has signed a four-album contract with Virgin Records worth an estimated $80 million, a mega-deal that ranks among the biggest ever awarded to an entertainer, said sources close to the negotiations. The New York native, who turned 31 last week, has been the target of a fierce industry bidding war since she began approaching the end of her Sony contract, which was set to expire with the release of a soundtrack album this year.
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BUSINESS
September 4, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eat your hearts out, Michael Jackson and Madonna. Prince signed what's believed to be the largest recording and music publishing contract in history on Thursday--an estimated $100-million, six-album deal with Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Bros. Records and Warner Chappel Music. Unlike Madonna's and Jackson's estimated $60-million-plus multimedia deals, Prince's contract reportedly allows him to pursue film, TV, book, video and merchandising agreements elsewhere.
NEWS
August 25, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
R.E.M., the hottest free agent in the music business, signed a five-album contract Saturday with Warner Bros. Records worth an estimated $80 million--the largest recording contract ever awarded, sources said. The Grammy-winning band's deal surpassed the $70-million mark achieved seven months ago by pop diva Janet Jackson as well as other mega-deals by such superstars as Michael Jackson and Madonna, whose six-album pacts included film and joint venture record label components.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Strike the pose. The rich pop star pose, that is. Madonna--whom Forbes last year listed as pop music's wealthiest material girl--got even richer Monday when she signed an estimated $60-million multimedia pact with Time Warner. The 7- to 11-year agreement guarantees the 33-year-old pop siren one of the most lucrative recording contracts in the business plus substantial funding for her own company to pursue music publishing, film, television, book and merchandising opportunities.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1993 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ice-T could come out of his uneasy departure from Warner Bros. Records a winner. The rapper is expected to sign an independent distribution deal in which his "Home Invasion" album will be released on his own independent label and distributed by Los Angeles-based Priority Records, which also releases albums by N.W.A. and Ice Cube. Sources say the album will be in stores by mid-March.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Rolling Stones reclaimed their title as rock's highest-paid band Wednesday when it signed an estimated $45-million contract with Virgin Records. The agreement begins with the group's next studio album, due in 1993. In bidding for the Stones, the British-based label won out over rival offers from three other companies, including Sony Music, the Japanese conglomerate that now owns Columbia Records, which signed the Stones to a record $25-million deal in 1983.
NEWS
August 25, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
R.E.M., the hottest free agent in the music business, signed a five-album contract Saturday with Warner Bros. Records worth an estimated $80 million--the largest recording contract ever awarded, sources said. The Grammy-winning band's deal surpassed the $70-million mark achieved seven months ago by pop diva Janet Jackson as well as other mega-deals by such superstars as Michael Jackson and Madonna, whose six-album pacts included film and joint venture record label components.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Analysts and shareholders aren't the only ones scratching their heads these days about the chaos at Warner Music Group. * Frustrated representatives for some of Warner's best-selling acts--including R.E.M., Stone Temple Pilots and Van Halen--are also concerned about the future of the $4-billion firm.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Motown Record Co., which is engaged in a bitter court fight with its distributor, MCA Records, on Wednesday said it will terminate its deal with MCA and hire a new distributor. Motown's operating committee voted to formally sever the MCA agreement, which is supposed to run through 1998, as of Sept. 8. Steven Marenberg, Motown's attorney, said the record label has already entered into discussions with other possible distribution companies.
NEWS
January 12, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pop diva Janet Jackson is expected to sign a four-album contract today with Virgin Records worth an estimated $80 million--an unprecedented fee that analysts say could set the stage for another round of music industry mega-deals. The pact is the biggest ever awarded, surpassing the $60-million mark shared by such superstars as Michael Jackson and Madonna, whose six-album deals included film and joint-venture record label components.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Analysts and shareholders aren't the only ones scratching their heads these days about the chaos at Warner Music Group. * Frustrated representatives for some of Warner's best-selling acts--including R.E.M., Stone Temple Pilots and Van Halen--are also concerned about the future of the $4-billion firm.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for the new regime at Warner Bros. Records, veteran rock star Neil Young is expected to sign a five-album deal today with its sister label, Reprise Records. Young, whose contract with the Warner-owned label expired last year, was one of several top artists who threatened to jump ship in October following a corporate battle that forced the departure of beloved Warner executives Mo Ostin and Lenny Waronker.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1993 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ice-T could come out of his uneasy departure from Warner Bros. Records a winner. The rapper is expected to sign an independent distribution deal in which his "Home Invasion" album will be released on his own independent label and distributed by Los Angeles-based Priority Records, which also releases albums by N.W.A. and Ice Cube. Sources say the album will be in stores by mid-March.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1993 | ROBERT HILBURN and STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Warner Bros. Records' severing of ties with Ice-T on Wednesday was described by sources at the label as "inevitable" given the national furor that began last summer over the controversial rapper's "Cop Killer" recording. Likening the relationship between Ice-T and Time Warner Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Country star Garth Brooks has lassoed a brand-new recording contract--and it's believed to be one of the largest and most uniquely structured deals ever negotiated. The 20-year pact with Thorn-EMI-owned Liberty Records, which has released all five of Brooks' albums, waives the multimillion-dollar "advances" customarily found in superstar contracts in favor a royalty rate that rivals the highest in the industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1992 | HEIDI SIEGMUND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Recording artists are getting the heave-ho-ho this holiday season as part of an ill-timed Grinch tradition. It's an annual end-of-the-year rite in the recording business, a serious kind of musical chairs when stars set out in search of new record labels, when companies pass on some acts' contract renewals, when labels simply drop some performers altogether.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1992 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Michael Jackson spent millions of dollars and much of two years recording his new "Dangerous" album. Country singer Garth Brooks and rock band Nirvana needed only an average of $125,000 and about two months each to deliver their "Ropin' the Wind" and "Nevermind" collections respectively. So what lesson does the pop world learn after Brooks and Nirvana both outsell Jackson during the busiest sales week of the year in the record industry?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1992 | HEIDI SIEGMUND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Recording artists are getting the heave-ho-ho this holiday season as part of an ill-timed Grinch tradition. It's an annual end-of-the-year rite in the recording business, a serious kind of musical chairs when stars set out in search of new record labels, when companies pass on some acts' contract renewals, when labels simply drop some performers altogether.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eat your hearts out, Michael Jackson and Madonna. Prince signed what's believed to be the largest recording and music publishing contract in history on Thursday--an estimated $100-million, six-album deal with Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Bros. Records and Warner Chappel Music. Unlike Madonna's and Jackson's estimated $60-million-plus multimedia deals, Prince's contract reportedly allows him to pursue film, TV, book, video and merchandising agreements elsewhere.
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