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Recording Industry England

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2000 | By PHIL SUTCLIFFE,
Since the Beatles, the special relationship between Britain and America has rarely looked so dysfunctional. The opening of the 2,000th Year of Our Lord and 46th Year of Our King--dating from Presley's debut single, of course--will find Americans enjoying thudding rap-rock, street-minded hip-hop and down-home country, while Britons bop themselves silly with tiny-tot pop, trance-dance and a little light Brit-rock.
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BUSINESS
January 30, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind the applause and promises of "a marriage made in heaven," there were audible sighs of regret in Britain last week over the proposed union between the country's last great music company, EMI, and the music assets of its Yankee competitor, Time Warner.
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BUSINESS
September 15, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Rob Dickins, chairman of Time Warner's British music division, is expected to exit his post by the time his contract expires in December, sources said. Time Warner has decided not to renew Dickins' deal but has yet to find an executive to replace him, sources said. Time Warner is wooing PolyGram Music Group President Roger Ames to fill a high-level post at Warner's international music division, sources said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2000 | By PHIL SUTCLIFFE,
Since the Beatles, the special relationship between Britain and America has rarely looked so dysfunctional. The opening of the 2,000th Year of Our Lord and 46th Year of Our King--dating from Presley's debut single, of course--will find Americans enjoying thudding rap-rock, street-minded hip-hop and down-home country, while Britons bop themselves silly with tiny-tot pop, trance-dance and a little light Brit-rock.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1990 | JEFF KAYE
The Rolling Stones and David Bowie were among the musicians who stepped in to help. Robert Plant and Phil Collins wrote a letter to The Times of London. More than 30,000 rock fans signed petitions. But British government officials, listening to the beat of a different drummer, swept aside their arguments in ruling on an issue that recently pushed the nation's music industry toward civil war. Mick Jagger be damned. Rock music and pop music, the British government has declared, are the same thing.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind the applause and promises of "a marriage made in heaven," there were audible sighs of regret in Britain last week over the proposed union between the country's last great music company, EMI, and the music assets of its Yankee competitor, Time Warner.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1987 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER JR., Times Staff Writer
In England, where he lives, Richard Branson is only a little less known than Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Prince Charles. At 36, he reigns as founder, chairman and majority owner of a multinational entertainment conglomerate called Virgin Group Ltd., which operates a major record label, a film company, a transatlantic airline, a chain of 100 record stores, six movie studios, a handful of popular nightclubs, a travel agency and a luxury retreat on its own Caribbean island.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Rob Dickins, chairman of Time Warner's British music division, is expected to exit his post by the time his contract expires in December, sources said. Time Warner has decided not to renew Dickins' deal but has yet to find an executive to replace him, sources said. Time Warner is wooing PolyGram Music Group President Roger Ames to fill a high-level post at Warner's international music division, sources said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1990 | JEFF KAYE
The Rolling Stones and David Bowie were among the musicians who stepped in to help. Robert Plant and Phil Collins wrote a letter to The Times of London. More than 30,000 rock fans signed petitions. But British government officials, listening to the beat of a different drummer, swept aside their arguments in ruling on an issue that recently pushed the nation's music industry toward civil war. Mick Jagger be damned. Rock music and pop music, the British government has declared, are the same thing.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1987 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER JR., Times Staff Writer
In England, where he lives, Richard Branson is only a little less known than Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Prince Charles. At 36, he reigns as founder, chairman and majority owner of a multinational entertainment conglomerate called Virgin Group Ltd., which operates a major record label, a film company, a transatlantic airline, a chain of 100 record stores, six movie studios, a handful of popular nightclubs, a travel agency and a luxury retreat on its own Caribbean island.
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