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NEWS
September 1, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no doubt that Michael "Harry O" Harris has entrepreneurial instincts. Growing up in a Los Angeles neighborhood he calls "the low bottom," he became one of the region's most notorious crack dealers before he was arrested and sent to prison in 1987. Since being in prison, he has decided that his real talents lie in the entertainment business.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1998 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Maybe it's time to think of LeAnn Rimes as the giant killer in pop music. As unlikely as it may seem given all the hoopla surrounding the Rolling Stones and U2 stadium tours, the 15-year-old country music sensation apparently generated more pop dollars in North America during 1997 than U2, and almost more than the Stones.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg's debut album, "Doggystyle," sold a spectacular 803,000 copies in its first week, the highest ever for a debut album--and the second most for any album--since SoundScan began its computerized monitoring of sales in 1991. The record is held by Pearl Jam's "Vs.," which sold 950,000 copies its first week in stores last month. Snoop--whose real name is Calvin Broadus--gained notoriety outside rap circles when he was charged in August as an accomplice to murder.
NEWS
September 1, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no doubt that Michael "Harry O" Harris has entrepreneurial instincts. Growing up in a Los Angeles neighborhood he calls "the low bottom," he became one of the region's most notorious crack dealers before he was arrested and sent to prison in 1987. Since being in prison, he has decided that his real talents lie in the entertainment business.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS and ROBERT HILBURN
Sales in the record industry jumped 7% worldwide in 1991 to more than $26 billion, and revenues are expected to fall roughly in that range this year, according to analysts. Yet some industry observers see serious trouble ahead. Recent figures, they say, are misleading because the business has been benefiting for years on sales to aging Baby Boomers buying old, catalogue product--i.e. Beatles albums--in new compact disc formats.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1993 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eileen Foster-Crosson might not be buying used compact discs were it not for the capriciousness of Cupid. The Santa Barbara chef recently broke up with her boyfriend of six years. She says he wound up with their 200 CDs, and she wound up with a shopping list. Hence, she spent a day off recently poring through the thousands of used CDs at Aron's Records in Hollywood, looking to replace some of her lost titles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hats off to Garth Brooks and Billy Ray Cyrus. The two country singers accounted for four of the seven biggest selling albums of 1992, a year in which a strong holiday sales spurt pushed total industry sales to about $8 billion--or about 8% over 1991, retailers said Monday. Brooks, with three albums among the final Top 10, and Cyrus, whose "Some Gave All" was the year's top seller, accounted for more than $231 million in sales. Cyrus' album sold an estimated 4.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite surprising sales dives by the new Prince and Madonna albums, record retailers across the nation voiced optimism Wednesday that the holiday sales season may help salvage what has been a flat year in pop. The reason for the rosy outlook: a feeling among retailers that there is a renewed sense of consumer confidence after the presidential election. "People seem to be in a more upbeat mood about the economy than they were before Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1998 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Maybe it's time to think of LeAnn Rimes as the giant killer in pop music. As unlikely as it may seem given all the hoopla surrounding the Rolling Stones and U2 stadium tours, the 15-year-old country music sensation apparently generated more pop dollars in North America during 1997 than U2, and almost more than the Stones.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1997 | Chuck Philips
In a move that could foreshadow an overhaul of New York-based PolyGram Music Group, Island Records dismissed more than a dozen employees this week. The label, which releases music by such acts as U2 and the Cranberries, is not the only PolyGram company suffering from a dry spell lately. Motown sales are flat, and sales are sluggish at Def Jam and A&M--although its Mercury Records is on a roll. The Island firings follow a round of staff cuts at competitors Warner Bros., EMI, Geffen and MCA.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1997 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it seems that U2 is "Pop"-ing up all over the place these days, that's good news to Island Records. Along with the Irish rock group's management team, the record company has been working behind the scenes for months trying to guarantee maximum media exposure in anticipation of the release next Tuesday of the band's new album, "Pop."
BUSINESS
December 28, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his latest hit, Meat Loaf sings "I'd Do Anything for Love." To hear the singer talk, he'd probably do anything for Al Teller too. It was Teller, the chairman of MCA's music entertainment group, who gambled on Meat Loaf's comeback some 15 years after he first hit pay dirt with the album "Bat Out of Hell." The gamble paid off handsomely for MCA when "Bat Out of Hell II" became its biggest hit of the year, selling 3.5 million copies in three months.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1993 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eileen Foster-Crosson might not be buying used compact discs were it not for the capriciousness of Cupid. The Santa Barbara chef recently broke up with her boyfriend of six years. She says he wound up with their 200 CDs, and she wound up with a shopping list. Hence, she spent a day off recently poring through the thousands of used CDs at Aron's Records in Hollywood, looking to replace some of her lost titles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rapper Snoop Doggy Dogg's debut album, "Doggystyle," sold a spectacular 803,000 copies in its first week, the highest ever for a debut album--and the second most for any album--since SoundScan began its computerized monitoring of sales in 1991. The record is held by Pearl Jam's "Vs.," which sold 950,000 copies its first week in stores last month. Snoop--whose real name is Calvin Broadus--gained notoriety outside rap circles when he was charged in August as an accomplice to murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1997 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it seems that U2 is "Pop"-ing up all over the place these days, that's good news to Island Records. Along with the Irish rock group's management team, the record company has been working behind the scenes for months trying to guarantee maximum media exposure in anticipation of the release next Tuesday of the band's new album, "Pop."
BUSINESS
December 28, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his latest hit, Meat Loaf sings "I'd Do Anything for Love." To hear the singer talk, he'd probably do anything for Al Teller too. It was Teller, the chairman of MCA's music entertainment group, who gambled on Meat Loaf's comeback some 15 years after he first hit pay dirt with the album "Bat Out of Hell." The gamble paid off handsomely for MCA when "Bat Out of Hell II" became its biggest hit of the year, selling 3.5 million copies in three months.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
U2 or Billy Ray Cyrus? Barbra Streisand or Janet Jackson? Snoop Dog or Arnold Schwarzenegger? Those are just a few of the choices music fans will be confronted with this summer--and it's such diversity that the nation's record retailers are counting on to help avoid a repeat of last summer's dismal sales.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hats off to Garth Brooks and Billy Ray Cyrus. The two country singers accounted for four of the seven biggest selling albums of 1992, a year in which a strong holiday sales spurt pushed total industry sales to about $8 billion--or about 8% over 1991, retailers said Monday. Brooks, with three albums among the final Top 10, and Cyrus, whose "Some Gave All" was the year's top seller, accounted for more than $231 million in sales. Cyrus' album sold an estimated 4.
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