Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRecording Industry Japan
IN THE NEWS

Recording Industry Japan

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 4, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kyozo Suzuki, a reform-minded official at Japan's Fair Trade Commission, would like to see compact discs sold competitively--the same way, for example, as fish--rather than at fixed prices set by the manufacturer. "At markets, if you go late in the evening, the unsold sashimi [fish to be eaten raw] is marked down in price. But they don't do things like that in the record industry," Suzuki said. "Wouldn't it be good if they sold them cheaply?
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
The Japanese are fascinated with things American. Baseball has become the island nation's favorite sport. McDonald's hamburgers are selling by the billions. American pop stars sell out Tokyo Stadium in a snap. And American jazz--which went through a boom in Japan when Sony was still mainly in the transistor radio business and Ford was bigger than Toyota--has now settled into a comfortable niche in the Japanese cultural consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Japanese pop group Dreams Come True debuted six years ago, its members thought about opening in London rather than in their own country. With a female lead singer and a soulful sound inspired by artists such as Marvin Gaye and Sarah Vaughan, the band seemed an improbable entrant into a music scene here that was then dominated by male bands and syrupy love songs rooted in enka, the traditional Japanese ballad.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kyozo Suzuki, a reform-minded official at Japan's Fair Trade Commission, would like to see compact discs sold competitively--the same way, for example, as fish--rather than at fixed prices set by the manufacturer. "At markets, if you go late in the evening, the unsold sashimi [fish to be eaten raw] is marked down in price. But they don't do things like that in the record industry," Suzuki said. "Wouldn't it be good if they sold them cheaply?
BUSINESS
August 2, 1991 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Consumer electronics manufacturer Denon on Thursday introduced what it billed as the first compact disc recorder for the home at a price of $19,000. Up to now, consumers have been able to buy prerecorded compact discs and players but could not record their own CDs from existing records, tapes or other discs. The Denon system enables them to do that--albeit, at a hefty price. Denon said it expects its prices to drop sharply within the next year and that units could sell for $5,000 in two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Japanese pop group Dreams Come True debuted six years ago, its members thought about opening in London rather than in their own country. With a female lead singer and a soulful sound inspired by artists such as Marvin Gaye and Sarah Vaughan, the band seemed an improbable entrant into a music scene here that was then dominated by male bands and syrupy love songs rooted in enka, the traditional Japanese ballad.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cramped Yu & Ai (friendship and love) compact disc store in a west Tokyo neighborhood hardly looks forbidding. Yet this store--and the 5,800 others like it in Japan catering to young students and office workers--make up what the U.S. recording industry calls one of its biggest problems in the world. Here, music lovers can browse through an enormous variety of selections by U.S. artists, from Mariah Carey and Madonna to John Mellencamp and Guns N' Roses.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1988 | JOHN C. DVORAK, JOHN C. DVORAK is a columnist for the San Francisco Examiner and for such computer publications as PC magazine and PC Computing
A s another Christmas approaches, Americans rejoice in the knowledge that the dread digital audio tape deck has been kept from our shores, thanks to the efforts of the Recording Industry Assn. of America. It's a good thing, too, because with one of these tape recorders a wily audiophile can make perfect digital duplicates of those popular compact discs. He can then give copies away like crazy to all his friends, thus ruining the record business once and for all. Digital audio tape decks have been available since 1987 in Japan and West Germany.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cramped Yu & Ai (friendship and love) compact disc store in a west Tokyo neighborhood hardly looks forbidding. Yet this store--and the 5,800 others like it in Japan catering to young students and office workers--make up what the U.S. recording industry calls one of its biggest problems in the world. Here, music lovers can browse through an enormous variety of selections by U.S. artists, from Mariah Carey and Madonna to John Mellencamp and Guns N' Roses.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1991 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Consumer electronics manufacturer Denon on Thursday introduced what it billed as the first compact disc recorder for the home at a price of $19,000. Up to now, consumers have been able to buy prerecorded compact discs and players but could not record their own CDs from existing records, tapes or other discs. The Denon system enables them to do that--albeit, at a hefty price. Denon said it expects its prices to drop sharply within the next year and that units could sell for $5,000 in two years.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1988 | JOHN C. DVORAK, JOHN C. DVORAK is a columnist for the San Francisco Examiner and for such computer publications as PC magazine and PC Computing
A s another Christmas approaches, Americans rejoice in the knowledge that the dread digital audio tape deck has been kept from our shores, thanks to the efforts of the Recording Industry Assn. of America. It's a good thing, too, because with one of these tape recorders a wily audiophile can make perfect digital duplicates of those popular compact discs. He can then give copies away like crazy to all his friends, thus ruining the record business once and for all. Digital audio tape decks have been available since 1987 in Japan and West Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
The Japanese are fascinated with things American. Baseball has become the island nation's favorite sport. McDonald's hamburgers are selling by the billions. American pop stars sell out Tokyo Stadium in a snap. And American jazz--which went through a boom in Japan when Sony was still mainly in the transistor radio business and Ford was bigger than Toyota--has now settled into a comfortable niche in the Japanese cultural consciousness.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|