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Recording Industry Labor Relations

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NEWS
November 3, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The $7-billion-a-year record industry, periodically beset by controversies ranging from payola to drugs, is quietly exerting damage control over a potential new scandal: complaints of sexual harassment by some of the top executives in the business. During the past 18 months, The Times has learned, at least three major record companies and a prominent Los Angeles law firm have had to cope with allegations of sexual misconduct by executives.
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BUSINESS
November 19, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesse Jackson's Rainbow/PUSH Coalition purchased stock this week in five of the six major record companies, and the civil rights leader said he is launching a campaign against racism and sexism in the industry. The move follows a meeting last week between Jackson and top brass at PolyGram Music Group that resulted in the Dutch corporation issuing a public apology for an "appalling" racial remark made recently by one of its senior officials.
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BUSINESS
November 19, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesse Jackson's Rainbow/PUSH Coalition purchased stock this week in five of the six major record companies, and the civil rights leader said he is launching a campaign against racism and sexism in the industry. The move follows a meeting last week between Jackson and top brass at PolyGram Music Group that resulted in the Dutch corporation issuing a public apology for an "appalling" racial remark made recently by one of its senior officials.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The $7-billion-a-year record industry, periodically beset by controversies ranging from payola to drugs, is quietly exerting damage control over a potential new scandal: complaints of sexual harassment by some of the top executives in the business. During the past 18 months, The Times has learned, at least three major record companies and a prominent Los Angeles law firm have had to cope with allegations of sexual misconduct by executives.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Federation of Musicians, which had threatened to strike over proposed record industry cutbacks to two special union funds, agreed Monday to a new contract that boosts wages and preserves the two controversial funds. Agreement on the new contract, which totals $50 million over three years, was reached after a week of tense negotiations and a nationwide union lobbying effort to enlist public support for the continuation of the funds.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Unfortunately, the music recording industry is once again trying to dump a valuable program that is primarily responsible for sponsoring 35,000 free live musical concerts across the country each year--a million performances since they began in 1948. The American Federation of Musicians will try to block the industry's counterproductive move in contract negotiations that start today in New York, and they hope to do it without a strike.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1988 | Wm. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
At a time when the record industry in general is booming, MCA Records on Friday issued pink slips to at least 25 employees in its New York and Universal City offices. Among those fired, according to industry sources, were the entire staff of the company's New York-based Uni record label and a number of people in its West Coast creative services and A&R departments. The A&R department, standing for "artists and repertoire," is responsible for signing and developing artists.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The entertainment industry, which was hit by a crippling 22-week strike by TV and movie writers in 1988, is bracing for a possible walkout by the American Federation of Musicians, which has told its 185,000 members that it will strike if record companies carry out plans to end payments to two special union funds.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1988 | STEVE POND
"This is just a drop in the bucket," A & M Records President Gil Friesen said a year ago when his record label initiated a program that gave summer music-industry jobs to 50 minority youngsters. On Monday, Friesen saw a second drop in the same bucket--but this time Y.E.S.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Federation of Musicians, which had threatened to strike over proposed record industry cutbacks to two special union funds, agreed Monday to a new contract that boosts wages and preserves the two controversial funds. Agreement on the new contract, which totals $50 million over three years, was reached after a week of tense negotiations and a nationwide union lobbying effort to enlist public support for the continuation of the funds.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Unfortunately, the music recording industry is once again trying to dump a valuable program that is primarily responsible for sponsoring 35,000 free live musical concerts across the country each year--a million performances since they began in 1948. The American Federation of Musicians will try to block the industry's counterproductive move in contract negotiations that start today in New York, and they hope to do it without a strike.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The entertainment industry, which was hit by a crippling 22-week strike by TV and movie writers in 1988, is bracing for a possible walkout by the American Federation of Musicians, which has told its 185,000 members that it will strike if record companies carry out plans to end payments to two special union funds.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1988 | Wm. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
At a time when the record industry in general is booming, MCA Records on Friday issued pink slips to at least 25 employees in its New York and Universal City offices. Among those fired, according to industry sources, were the entire staff of the company's New York-based Uni record label and a number of people in its West Coast creative services and A&R departments. The A&R department, standing for "artists and repertoire," is responsible for signing and developing artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1988 | STEVE POND
"This is just a drop in the bucket," A & M Records President Gil Friesen said a year ago when his record label initiated a program that gave summer music-industry jobs to 50 minority youngsters. On Monday, Friesen saw a second drop in the same bucket--but this time Y.E.S.
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