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Recording Industry Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1991 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The music dies today at the Record Plant in Hollywood, one of the world's premier recording studios since 1969 and a home away from home for the elite of rock music--sometimes for months at a time. Roll a few credits, please: "Hotel California" was recorded there by the Eagles. Likewise "Songs in the Key of Life" by Stevie Wonder, "Rumours" by Fleetwood Mac, "Nick of Time" by Bonnie Raitt, portions of "Rock 'n' Roll" by John Lennon. And so on.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coronations of kings and outbreaks of war. Civic triumphs and cultural changes. For nearly 70 years the engineers on Melrose Avenue were ear-witnesses to it all. They recorded the West's first wireless broadcasts. They produced the pioneering radio commercials that helped shape Southern California's laid-back car culture. They helped create some of the record industry's bestsellers. But on Friday they'll switch off the last vacuum-tube amplifier and unplug the last 50-year-old audiotape console.
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NEWS
September 1, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no doubt that Michael "Harry O" Harris has entrepreneurial instincts. Growing up in a Los Angeles neighborhood he calls "the low bottom," he became one of the region's most notorious crack dealers before he was arrested and sent to prison in 1987. Since being in prison, he has decided that his real talents lie in the entertainment business.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | ROBERT HILBURN and GEOFF BOUCHER and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After 37 years of spinning out hits by such acts as Cat Stevens, the Police and Sheryl Crow, A & M Records closed its doors Thursday--firing nearly 170 employees who were given the day to pack and leave. Artists and executives hugged in the parking lot as weeping employees carried boxes of personal belongings to their cars. Above them, the A & M sign was draped with a black band and the flag flew at half staff, to commemorate, fired workers said, the death of the historic Hollywood record label.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coronations of kings and outbreaks of war. Civic triumphs and cultural changes. For nearly 70 years the engineers on Melrose Avenue were ear-witnesses to it all. They recorded the West's first wireless broadcasts. They produced the pioneering radio commercials that helped shape Southern California's laid-back car culture. They helped create some of the record industry's bestsellers. But on Friday they'll switch off the last vacuum-tube amplifier and unplug the last 50-year-old audiotape console.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
Eazy-E was rapping about reality the other day, extolling the virtues of telling it like it is. The young Compton rapper, who also runs the rap production company Ruthless Records, was lunching with his pal, writer/rapper M.C. Ren, at a Westside deli that's one of their favorite dining spots. "Why do you think the fans like us--why they prefer our street raps over all that phony stuff out there?" asked Eazy-E, who has a hit album, "Eazy Duz It." He's also a member of the group N.W.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Sony Corp.--widely criticized for its profligate spending on movies and music--executives will be looking for a little vindication in their stockings this Christmas. The Japanese electronics giant hopes to dominate the box office and album charts over the holidays with Steven Spielberg's film "Hook" and Michael Jackson's record "Dangerous." Sony also has the high-profile movies "Bugsy," "My Girl" and "The Prince of Tides" under its tree.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1989 | KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a widely expected move, Walt Disney Co. announced Tuesday that it will wade into "the mainstream" of the recorded music business by starting a new label to be run by Peter T. Paterno, an industry lawyer who has represented heavy metal acts. Disney--which already owns the largest children's music company in the world--recently told Wall Street analysts that it would enter the industry's mainstream, and Paterno told The Times last month that discussions about his hiring were under way.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ice Cube, star of the hot "Boyz N the Hood" movie, is known on record for his angry urban commentaries. In recent years, he has gone after some familiar villains: drug dealers, corrupt police, pimps, prostitutes. But many of the Los Angeles rapper's fans were probably caught off guard by the target of his recent video for "Jackin' for Beats": record counterfeiters.
NEWS
September 1, 1997 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no doubt that Michael "Harry O" Harris has entrepreneurial instincts. Growing up in a Los Angeles neighborhood he calls "the low bottom," he became one of the region's most notorious crack dealers before he was arrested and sent to prison in 1987. Since being in prison, he has decided that his real talents lie in the entertainment business.
NEWS
April 3, 1995 | JACK CHEEVERS and CHUCK PHILIPS and FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One night last month two incidents--a music award and a killing--pointed up the relationship between artistry and violence that defines Death Row Records, the nation's hottest producer of "gangsta rap" music: The debut album of Snoop Doggy Dogg, Death Row's charismatic superstar, took top honors at the Soul Train Music Awards. A few hours after the show, a 28-year-old fan was fatally stomped at a party the company threw for its out-of-town retailers and promoters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1994 | DAVID J. FOX and DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The earthquake didn't wake up members of one Los Angeles movie crew. They were in the middle of production, filming just miles from the epicenter. "All I could think of was the movie 'San Francisco,' " said photographer Tony Friedkin, referring to the 1936 Clark Gable film set against the 1906 quake. Friedkin and the 100 other cast and crew members scrambled off a sound stage in Sylmar at 4:31 a.m.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE and TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Few who watched television in the weeks after last year's riots could miss the recurring image of actor Edward James Olmos, broom or walkie-talkie in hand, leading cleanup brigades throughout South Los Angeles and dispatching hundreds of volunteers to blighted street corners. At the time, celebrities seemed to be everywhere, rallying at the First AME Church, taping public-service announcements at a distant Warner Bros. sound stage in Burbank.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1992 | TIMES STAFF WRITER
Live Entertainment Inc., revealing that its auditors have expressed doubts about the home video firm's ability to continue as a going concern, on Wednesday reported a $107-million loss for 1991. The Van Nuys company, 53%-owned by troubled movie producer Carolco Pictures Inc., reported a fourth-quarter loss of $7.8 million, contrasted with earnings a year earlier of $13.7 million. Revenue for the quarter fell 10% to $122 million, from $136 million in 1990.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Sony Corp.--widely criticized for its profligate spending on movies and music--executives will be looking for a little vindication in their stockings this Christmas. The Japanese electronics giant hopes to dominate the box office and album charts over the holidays with Steven Spielberg's film "Hook" and Michael Jackson's record "Dangerous." Sony also has the high-profile movies "Bugsy," "My Girl" and "The Prince of Tides" under its tree.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walter R. Yetnikoff, the volatile chief executive of CBS Records, will curtail his management role at the label he helped catapult to the top of the music charts. After running CBS Records for 15 years and engineering its $2-billion sale to Sony Corp. in 1989, Yetnikoff has signed a new multimillion-dollar contract that calls for him to leave in two years and become a consultant to the company.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1991 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The indictment this week of a local record promoter on tax charges shows that prosecutors are trying to salvage something from a costly federal payola investigation that ran aground last year when a judge threw out a key case on grounds of government misconduct. But it is still uncertain whether the long-running probe may rekindle and spread further. The prosecutors aren't saying. On Wednesday, a federal grand jury returned a three-count indictment charging Ronald T.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1991 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The indictment this week of a local record promoter on tax charges shows that prosecutors are trying to salvage something from a costly federal payola investigation that ran aground last year when a judge threw out a key case on grounds of government misconduct. But it is still uncertain whether the long-running probe may rekindle and spread further. The prosecutors aren't saying. On Wednesday, a federal grand jury returned a three-count indictment charging Ronald T.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ice Cube, star of the hot "Boyz N the Hood" movie, is known on record for his angry urban commentaries. In recent years, he has gone after some familiar villains: drug dealers, corrupt police, pimps, prostitutes. But many of the Los Angeles rapper's fans were probably caught off guard by the target of his recent video for "Jackin' for Beats": record counterfeiters.
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