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NEWS
February 22, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS and MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In 10 years, C. Michael Greene has transformed the Grammy Awards from a minor industry ritual into the global television event airing Wednesday night before an audience of 1.5 billion. Along the way, the 49-year-old Greene, chief executive of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, has transformed himself into one of the most powerful and controversial figures in the music industry. Once a struggling Atlanta saxophonist, Greene now lives in a $1.
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NEWS
February 22, 1998 | CHUCK PHILIPS and MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In 10 years, C. Michael Greene has transformed the Grammy Awards from a minor industry ritual into the global television event airing Wednesday night before an audience of 1.5 billion. Along the way, the 49-year-old Greene, chief executive of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, has transformed himself into one of the most powerful and controversial figures in the music industry. Once a struggling Atlanta saxophonist, Greene now lives in a $1.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1992
This list of pop music's Top 40--the people who will shape the $25-billion recording industry in the '90s and beyond--was compiled after scores of interviews with industry insiders. The alphabetical listing begins with the men, dubbed by one industry wag "the Six Suits," who head the record divisions of the multinational corporate giants that dominate the business. The list continues over the next two pages. MICHAEL DORNEMANN,chairman and CEO, Bertelsmann Music Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS AND ROBERT HILBURN
It's a sign of how deep the good ole boy network goes in the record business that the three women who caused the most news in 1992 were employees who filed sexual harassment suits against their bosses. Other than Madonna, no woman was consistently named as a major power player during scores of interviews conducted to compile Calendar's Top 40 list.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS AND ROBERT HILBURN
It's a sign of how deep the good ole boy network goes in the record business that the three women who caused the most news in 1992 were employees who filed sexual harassment suits against their bosses. Other than Madonna, no woman was consistently named as a major power player during scores of interviews conducted to compile Calendar's Top 40 list.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leave it to Madonna. Who else could transform the simple act of voting into a provocative display of sexual innuendo? On Monday at 10 p.m., MTV will debut the pop siren's latest video clip: a 60-second, rap-oriented public service advertisement in which she encourages her fans to express themselves at the voting booth: Dr. King, Malcom X Freedom of speech Is as good as sex . Madonna delivers the rhyme wearing red bikini underwear with an American flag curled around her shoulders.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1992
This list of pop music's Top 40--the people who will shape the $25-billion recording industry in the '90s and beyond--was compiled after scores of interviews with industry insiders. The alphabetical listing begins with the men, dubbed by one industry wag "the Six Suits," who head the record divisions of the multinational corporate giants that dominate the business. The list continues over the next two pages. MICHAEL DORNEMANN,chairman and CEO, Bertelsmann Music Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leave it to Madonna. Who else could transform the simple act of voting into a provocative display of sexual innuendo? On Monday at 10 p.m., MTV will debut the pop siren's latest video clip: a 60-second, rap-oriented public service advertisement in which she encourages her fans to express themselves at the voting booth: Dr. King, Malcom X Freedom of speech Is as good as sex . Madonna delivers the rhyme wearing red bikini underwear with an American flag curled around her shoulders.
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