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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1988
* By Calendar's deadline, CBS Records couldn't immediately provide a breakdown from the company's 1,300-member executive staff, which includes vp's, directors and managers. Label Female VPs Total VPs A&M 0 21 Arista 0 9 Atlantic 9 22 Capitol/EMI/Manhattan 4 48 CBS (Columbia/Epic) 5 * Elektra 1 11 Geffen 1 7 MCA 6 34 Motown 3 6 PolyGram 7 40 RCA 1 12 Warner Bros. 8 39
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1996 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was another big year creatively for women in music, according to the nominations for the 38th Grammy Awards announced Thursday. But that doesn't mean the nominations were business as usual. The top nominees in recent years have included such soothing, pop-oriented artists as Whitney Houston and Natale Cole, but many of the female nominees in the major categories this time have a more biting edge to their music, perhaps reflecting a change in the voting process.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS AND ROBERT HILBURN
It's a sign of how deep the good ole boy network goes in the record business that the three women who caused the most news in 1992 were employees who filed sexual harassment suits against their bosses. Other than Madonna, no woman was consistently named as a major power player during scores of interviews conducted to compile Calendar's Top 40 list.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rumors are not true. Sylvia Rhone will not be among the names announced this morning in New York when her mentor, MCA Music Chairman Doug Morris, unveils his new management team. That's not to say that MCA and several other firms haven't tried in recent months to lure Rhone away from her current post as chair of Time Warner's Elektra Entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1995 | Chuck Philips, Chuck Philips is a Times staff writer
The rock 'n' roll stage isn't the only place where women are gaining a foothold in the music world. Dramatic progress has also been made by female executives since Calendar's 1992 in-depth report on sexism in the record business. Indeed, the industry's latest bidding war isn't over a hot band from Seattle or Chicago. The target of the latest chase is talent scout Margaret Mittleman, who is being courted by no fewer than a dozen top record labels, including powerhouses Geffen, Atlantic and Epic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, Chuck Philips writes about pop music for Calendar.
Sylvia Rhone had been in the record business for 18 years, so she knew she was making history when she walked into the corporate board room of New York's Time-Life Building on a brisk morning last February. A Wharton School graduate and single mother, Rhone, 39, was attending for the first time the annual meeting of the policy-making executives that shape the destiny of Warner Music Group, the world's largest recording and publishing combine.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1995 | Richard Cromelin, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for Calendar
Onstage at LunaPark in West Hollywood, the diminutive, short-haired Dionne Farris resembles an elfin creature as she crouches and traces shapes in the air with her fingers in response to her band's music, an eclectic blend that spins out in several directions from its R&B foundation. Opening the soul ballad "Passion," Farris floats her voice atop warm currents of airy, folk-style guitar picking.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN and SHARON LIVETEN
Shelly Heber reached a career crossroads 11 years ago. From a look at the resume of the then eight-year veteran of the record business, you'd have thought she was making nice progress: a brief stint as charts editor at Billboard magazine before handling the pop promotion department at 20th Century Fox Records and then serving as the label's director of marketing.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rumors are not true. Sylvia Rhone will not be among the names announced this morning in New York when her mentor, MCA Music Chairman Doug Morris, unveils his new management team. That's not to say that MCA and several other firms haven't tried in recent months to lure Rhone away from her current post as chair of Time Warner's Elektra Entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1993 | Chuck Philips
Sylvia Rhone, generally regarded as the most powerful woman in the record industry, never doubted that she'd one day run her own company. The Harlem native, who grew up listening to Aretha Franklin and Marvin Gaye, says repeated encounters with racism and sexism in the music industry only fueled her commitment to push harder.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1995 | Chuck Philips, Chuck Philips is a Times staff writer
The rock 'n' roll stage isn't the only place where women are gaining a foothold in the music world. Dramatic progress has also been made by female executives since Calendar's 1992 in-depth report on sexism in the record business. Indeed, the industry's latest bidding war isn't over a hot band from Seattle or Chicago. The target of the latest chase is talent scout Margaret Mittleman, who is being courted by no fewer than a dozen top record labels, including powerhouses Geffen, Atlantic and Epic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1995 | Richard Cromelin, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for Calendar
Onstage at LunaPark in West Hollywood, the diminutive, short-haired Dionne Farris resembles an elfin creature as she crouches and traces shapes in the air with her fingers in response to her band's music, an eclectic blend that spins out in several directions from its R&B foundation. Opening the soul ballad "Passion," Farris floats her voice atop warm currents of airy, folk-style guitar picking.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, Chuck Philips writes about pop music for Calendar.
Sylvia Rhone had been in the record business for 18 years, so she knew she was making history when she walked into the corporate board room of New York's Time-Life Building on a brisk morning last February. A Wharton School graduate and single mother, Rhone, 39, was attending for the first time the annual meeting of the policy-making executives that shape the destiny of Warner Music Group, the world's largest recording and publishing combine.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1993 | Chuck Philips
Sylvia Rhone, generally regarded as the most powerful woman in the record industry, never doubted that she'd one day run her own company. The Harlem native, who grew up listening to Aretha Franklin and Marvin Gaye, says repeated encounters with racism and sexism in the music industry only fueled her commitment to push harder.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1992 | CHUCK PHILIPS AND ROBERT HILBURN
It's a sign of how deep the good ole boy network goes in the record business that the three women who caused the most news in 1992 were employees who filed sexual harassment suits against their bosses. Other than Madonna, no woman was consistently named as a major power player during scores of interviews conducted to compile Calendar's Top 40 list.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1988
* By Calendar's deadline, CBS Records couldn't immediately provide a breakdown from the company's 1,300-member executive staff, which includes vp's, directors and managers. Label Female VPs Total VPs A&M 0 21 Arista 0 9 Atlantic 9 22 Capitol/EMI/Manhattan 4 48 CBS (Columbia/Epic) 5 * Elektra 1 11 Geffen 1 7 MCA 6 34 Motown 3 6 PolyGram 7 40 RCA 1 12 Warner Bros. 8 39
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1996 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was another big year creatively for women in music, according to the nominations for the 38th Grammy Awards announced Thursday. But that doesn't mean the nominations were business as usual. The top nominees in recent years have included such soothing, pop-oriented artists as Whitney Houston and Natale Cole, but many of the female nominees in the major categories this time have a more biting edge to their music, perhaps reflecting a change in the voting process.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN and SHARON LIVETEN
Shelly Heber reached a career crossroads 11 years ago. From a look at the resume of the then eight-year veteran of the record business, you'd have thought she was making nice progress: a brief stint as charts editor at Billboard magazine before handling the pop promotion department at 20th Century Fox Records and then serving as the label's director of marketing.
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