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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2008 | Randy Lewis
A late-year burst of holiday good cheer made pop tenor Josh Groban's "Noel" to the biggest-selling album of 2007, with nearly 3.7 million copies in the three months since it was released. It also made Groban the year's top-selling recording artist, with a total of 4.8 million albums sold during the year, according to Nielsen SoundScan. He bested the No. 2 finisher, Hannah Montana, by nearly 1 million albums. "Noel" topped the soundtrack to "High School Musical 2," which sold just shy of 3 million copies, and the Eagles' first studio album in 28 years, "Long Road Out of Eden," which has sold 2.6 million copies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2007 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
Much of the most-prized music these days is housed in big rooms, whether it's the massive Staples Center or its still-large baby brother Nokia Theatre, but there was a time in the late '60s and early '70s when the best music was frequently showcased in small rooms -- the rootsy Ash Grove on Melrose, the honky-tonkish Palomino on Lankershim and, above all, the folk-oriented Troubadour on Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Sony Music must pay the founder of a small record company $5 million for failing to put his company's logo on reissues of Meat Loaf's "Bat Out of Hell" album, a federal appeals court ruled. Steve Popovich, 65, who started Cleveland International Records in 1977 and soon afterward signed the singer named Marvin Lee Aday, persuaded Epic Records to release the wildly successful album. Epic was owned at the time by CBS. Sony, which bought out CBS Records, paid $6.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A woman facing a $222,000 music-sharing verdict asked a judge Monday to overturn it. Jurors in a case that six record companies brought against Jammie Thomas found that she violated the companies' copyrights by offering 24 songs over the Kazaa file-sharing network. They ordered Thomas, a mother of two who makes $36,000 a year, to pay the companies $222,000. In a motion filed Monday, Thomas' attorney, Brian Toder, did not argue that she hadn't violated the copyrights.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2007 | Geoff Boucher and Chris Lee, Times Staff Writers
The great riddle facing the record industry in the digital age has been pricing. Napster and its ilk puckishly offered music for "free" in the late 1990s, and the major labels have largely clung to an average of $13 for CDs despite plummeting sales and seasons of downsizing. Now, one of the world's most acclaimed rock bands, Radiohead, is answering that marketplace riddle with a shrug.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2007 | Jake Coyle, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- A side effect to today's fractured, tumultuous music industry is the fluctuating meaning of the greatest-hits album. On one hand, it remains a giant moneymaker for labels, which are urging their artists to make best-of compilations increasingly earlier in their careers. On the other, iTunes has made greatest-hits albums redundant. If you want an act's highlights, you can assemble them yourself.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The first obituaries for cassette tapes appeared more than 20 years ago, when compact discs hit the market. Sales of music tapes plummeted from 442 million in 1990 to about 700,000 last year, according to the Recording Industry Assn. of America. Anyone trying to impress a friend with the perfect combination of songs can probably burn a CD or assemble an MP3 playlist in a matter of minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Kelly Clarkson has done a lot of talking about reports of a feud with Clive Davis over the direction of her new album, "My December." Now, she's apologizing. "I want to set the record straight on this by saying that I want my band, my advisors, those close to me and my record label to be one big, tightly knit family," the 25-year-old singer said Monday in a statement posted on her website.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2007 | Joseph Menn and Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writers
Universal Music Group declined to renew its yearlong deal to license songs to Apple Inc. in the most public clash to date between a record label and the top retailer of digital music. The largest of the four major labels informed Apple last week, people familiar with the matter said Monday. Universal has no plans to stop selling music over Apple's iTunes music store, which sells a majority of digitized tracks in the U.S., the people said.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A coalition of recording artists, music companies and industry groups said Thursday that it would push for compensation of performers whose music is played on the radio. The MusicFirst Coalition, which counts recording artists Don Henley, Celine Dion, Christina Aguilera and Wyclef Jean among its members, intends to lobby Congress for new laws requiring the payments by broadcasters. The group said U.S.
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