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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2006 | From Times Staff Reports
The murder trial of record producer Phil Spector has been moved to Sept. 11. Spector's trial was to begin April 24, but his attorney, Bruce Cutler, and prosecutors are involved in other trials during that period. Spector is accused of shooting actress Lana Clarkson at his Alhambra home in 2003. He is free on $1-million bail.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
That Phil Ramone was a musical force in the recording studio is undeniable, and the evidence lies in the range of his accomplishments. For example, within one three-year period in the early 1960s, Ramone mixed Lesley Gore's smash hit "It's My Party," recorded Marilyn Monroe seducing President John F. Kennedy in song on his birthday and engineered essential double-quartet recordings by jazz innovators Ornette Coleman and Eric Dolphy. Ramone, who died Saturday in his late 70s or early 80s, depending on sources, would have been only around 30 at the time.
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NEWS
February 27, 1995
Denny Cordell, 51, record producer who worked with such artists as Chet Baker, Tom Petty and Melissa Etheridge. A native of Argentina educated in England, Cordell became influential in the evolution of contemporary popular music. He managed Baker in the mid-1960s and then went to work for Island Records in 1965. He left to produce the Moody Blues' first album, "Go Now: The Moody Blues 1."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Phil Ramone, the veteran record producer whose work with A-list artists including Barbra Streisand, Bob Dylan and Paul Simon made him one of the most respected figures in the music industry, died Saturday at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Billboard reported. He was 79. Ramone was hospitalized last month following an aortic aneurysm. Born in South Africa, Ramone studied classical violin at New York's Juilliard School before moving behind the board. His extensive credits include Dylan's "Blood on the Tracks," Billy Joel's "52nd Street" and Paul Simon's "Still Crazy After All These Years," for which he shared the Grammy Award for album of the year.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Record producer David Anderle has sold his home in the Hollywood Hills West area for $3.7 million. The Spanish-style villa, built in 1925, was once used as a speak-easy. Features include decorative tile work, beamed ceilings, a wine cellar and an artist's studio. The three-bedroom, 31/2-bathroom house contains 3,813 square feet of living space and sits on a third of an acre. The former A&M Records executive produced songs for Rita Coolidge, Kris Kristofferson and the Circle Jerks, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Phil Ramone, the veteran record producer whose work with A-list artists including Barbra Streisand, Bob Dylan and Paul Simon made him one of the most respected figures in the music industry, died Saturday at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Billboard reported. He was 79. Ramone was hospitalized last month following an aortic aneurysm. Born in South Africa, Ramone studied classical violin at New York's Juilliard School before moving behind the board. His extensive credits include Dylan's "Blood on the Tracks," Billy Joel's "52nd Street" and Paul Simon's "Still Crazy After All These Years," for which he shared the Grammy Award for album of the year.
NEWS
May 10, 1995
Clarence Paul, 67, composer and Motown Records producer for such artists as Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder. Known throughout the industry as "C.P.," Paul composed several popular songs, including Wonder's "Fingertips" and Gaye's "Hitchhike." Paul also wrote "A Place in the Sun," "Hey, Love" and "Until You Come Back to Me." Paul traveled with Wonder as his guardian in the early years and sang a duet with him on "Blowing in the Wind." On Saturday in Los Angeles of diabetes and heart problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miles Goodman, composer of music for films and innovative producer of recordings by major artists such as composer Stephen Sondheim, has died. He was 47. Goodman collapsed Friday at his Brentwood home and was pronounced dead at St. John's Hospital and Medical Center in Santa Monica of a heart attack. Last year Goodman co-produced the highly praised jazz album "Color and Light: Jazz Sketches of Sondheim" featuring jazz artists--and the reclusive composer himself--interpreting Sondheim music.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1986
Monk Higgins, a saxophonist and record producer who arranged and composed for such performers as Etta James, Muddy Waters, Blood, Sweat & Tears and Gloria Lynn, is dead at age 50. He died July 3 at Centinela Hospital in Inglewood of respiratory ailments. Most recently he was musical director at Marla's Memory Lane and played there with his band in Monday night blues shows. He also scored and composed commercials and twice was nominated for Grammy awards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1987 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
John Hammond, the record producer, talent scout and critic credited with the discovery or promotion of musicians ranging from Count Basie to Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen, died Friday in his Manhattan apartment. He was 76. At the time he died, said CBS spokesman Robert Altshuler, a longtime friend, Hammond was listening to a recording by Billie Holiday, the late and troubled singer who was one of Hammond's major finds. Hammond had been ill for some time.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
Are you planning to watch HBO's "Phil Spector"? Then step into my cubicle. We need to talk. I'm just a reporter, so my opinions about film aesthetics don't add up to much, but as one of the only journalists to cover both of Spector's murder trials, I can tell you that this movie, which premieres Sunday, is a bomb factually. And in an era when millions depend on "The Daily Show" for their news and best picture nominees for their history lessons, that scares me. Most viewers will know very little about the Spector case, and when the program is over, their understanding will be deeply flawed.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Record producer Terry Lewis and his wife, Indira, have sold their ocean-view house in Malibu for $3.735 million. The one-acre estate includes a Spanish-style house, a sports court, a swimming pool with a spa, and gardens. The 6,710-square-foot open-plan home, built in 2001, features a media room, five bedrooms and 51/2 bathrooms. Lewis is part of a songwriting and production team with Jimmy Jam. The Grammy-winning Jam and Lewis have produced hits for singers including Janet Jackson, Boyz II Men and Mariah Carey.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Record producer David Anderle has sold his home in the Hollywood Hills West area for $3.7 million. The Spanish-style villa, built in 1925, was once used as a speak-easy. Features include decorative tile work, beamed ceilings, a wine cellar and an artist's studio. The three-bedroom, 31/2-bathroom house contains 3,813 square feet of living space and sits on a third of an acre. The former A&M Records executive produced songs for Rita Coolidge, Kris Kristofferson and the Circle Jerks, among others.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Record producer Ralph Sall has listed his Sunset Strip-area house at $2.95 million. The remodeled Spanish-style house, built in 1926, features iron work, interior archways, French doors, balconies and an updated kitchen. The close to 3,300 square feet of living space includes five bedrooms and 41/2 bathrooms in the main house and an attached guesthouse. Extensive decks and patios, a loggia and a saltwater swimming pool complete the grounds. Sall is president of Bulletproof Entertainment.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Time
Record producer David Anderle has listed his longtime Hollywood Hills home for sale at $4.75 million. Built in the 1920s, the Spanish-style villa was once a speak-easy. Details include decorative tile work and beamed ceilings. The three-bedroom, four-bathroom house contains 3,813 square feet of living space and sits on a third of an acre. The former A&M Records executive produced songs for Rita Coolidge, Kris Kristofferson and the Circle Jerks, among others. He worked with Brian Wilson to help him form Brother Records.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2011 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
This year, the Producers Guild of America could just rename its annual award show after Scott Rudin. For Rudin's two nominations Tuesday morning, for "The Social Network" and "True Grit," landed the producer in the record books for being the first person nominated by the guild twice in one year. Not only that, his achievement also coincides with the guild's previously planned presentation to Rudin of the esteemed David O. Selznick award. "I find the whole thing rather humbling," said an obviously delighted Rudin, who did have two pictures in the running in 2008, with "No Country for Old Men" and " There Will Be Blood," but since he was an executive producer on "Blood," he was not given the same level of credit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2000
Richard Eugene Glasser, a retired record producer, singer and songwriter, died of lung cancer Monday at his Thousand Oaks home. He was 66. He was born Dec. 8, 1933, in Canton, Ohio, the third of 11 children and the oldest of five boys. He graduated from Minerva High School in Canton before serving in the Navy. Glasser began songwriting in the mid-1950s with a song he originally called "Angels."
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Owen Bradley, musician and record producer credited with making Nashville the country music capital of the world, has died. He was 82. Bradley, who had suffered from heart problems, died Wednesday in a Nashville hospital, two days after he was hospitalized for respiratory flu symptoms. He was a key figure in advancing the careers of such country music icons as Loretta Lynn, Brenda Lee, Conway Twitty and Patsy Cline.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Whatever the theme song to Phil Spector's troubled life and times might be, "To Know Him Is to Love Him" probably isn't it. That, as Spector fans know, is the title of the legendary record producer's first hit, recorded by the Teddy Bears in 1958 with words taken from the epitaph on his father's tombstone. Spector went on to produce hits almost without number, including "Be My Baby," "He's a Rebel," "Da Doo Ron Ron" and "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling. " Today, however, the man Sean Lennon called "the genius geniuses come to" is in prison serving 19 years to life after the jury in a second trial convicted him of the Alhambra murder of actress Lana Clarkson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2009 | Kimi Yoshino
The doors to the Forum in Inglewood opened Tuesday to a massive mobile hospital, the largest and longest-running free clinic ever attempted in the 25-year history of Remote Area Medical Foundation, a Tennessee-based nonprofit more accustomed to serving rural America. Each day since, more than 750 patients have been served, many waiting for hours and some sleeping overnight in their cars for a chance at a free exam. In the first three days of the clinic's eight-day run, the foundation provided 1,640 fillings, performed 706 tooth extractions and 141 mammograms and doled out more than 550 eyeglasses.
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