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Recording Session

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes regularly about music for The Times. and
I'm never in the spotlight I'm usually stuck in the back And you can't even see me 'cause they make me dress in black. I'm a backup singer, baby. . . Singer-songwriter Marie Cain's whimsical "Back-up Singer Blues" says it perfectly. After all, it's not hard to understand why backup singers have the blues when you think about what happened to the folks who worked for Milli Vanilli.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Lynell George, Special to the Los Angeles Times
NEW ORLEANS - Pianist Jon Cleary has lived in this city all of his life: Even when he didn't. Long before he saw it. And even when he was in forced exile from it. A musician by trade, a storyteller by consequence, Cleary has deeply absorbed New Orleans' pace and idiosyncrasies and, over time, its distinctive stories and sound. "My ambition," he says, "has always been to come to New Orleans. " Cleary, whose genre-bending style is steeped in early traditional New Orleans R&B, soul and funk, is not a household name but he's recorded and toured with marquee artists such as Taj Mahal and Bonnie Raitt (with whom he worked for more than a decade)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1985
Bob Geldof is a compassionate man. It was his compassion for Ethiopian famine victims that prompted him to organize the English Band Aid record, and also pushed U.S. artists to act in behalf of Africa's starving. It is time people stop pitting USA for Africa against its British predecessor (Calendar Letters, April 7). That's what Geldof did when he joined hands with Ken Kragen and Harry Belafonte at the "We Are the World" recording session. England, America, what does it matter?
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Chris Barton, Tribune Newspapers
Not unlike its counterpart rock 'n' roll, memorable jazz novels occupy a pretty slim shelf at the local bookstore. Though the music has been gracefully spun into fiction by Roddy Doyle, Michael Ondaatje and - most distinctively - Rafi Zabor in the surreal, ursine-centric "The Bear Comes Home," it's a fringe topic for the most part. Maybe that's because when people want to read about jazz, the characters behind the real story are rich enough to transcend any fiction - or maybe it's just a reflection of how well-meaning writers can run into trouble once they start putting into words something as ephemeral and personal as a saxophone solo.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN and VICTOR VALLE, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national international news services and the nation's press
A group of top stage, screen and recording stars will gather Sunday on the Paramount lot in Hollywood to record "For You, Armenia," a song written by Charles Aznavour and Paul Williams to benefit the Armenian Relief Society's Earthquake Relief Fund. Among those scheduled to join the songwriters for the recording session are Dionne Warwick, Ray Parker Jr., Rita Coolidge, Sammy Davis Jr., David Soul and members of the band Toto.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1991
Re Chuck Philips' "Voices That Care" (Feb. 6), about the musical tribute to the armed forces in the Persian Gulf organized by David Foster and Linda Thompson Jenner: Philips writes that participants were asked to "check their political agendas at the door." Don't Foster and Jenner realize that by organizing the recording session they are declaring their political agendas? Jenner is quoted as saying that they simply want to show their gratitude to those "laying their lives on the line for our freedom."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000
"The Making of the Musical 'The Last Session,' " featuring a discussion with the show's composer-lyricist Steve Schalchlin and author-director Jim Brochu, will be presented by Broadway on Sunset on May 22 at 7:30 p.m., at Upstairs at the Coronet Theatre, 368 N. La Cienega Blvd. After workshopping at the Zephyr Theatre in 1996, "The Last Session" went on to critically acclaimed, extended hit runs between 1997 and 1999 in New York, at the Laguna Playhouse and at the Tiffany Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2006
CHRIS PASLES' article "Lining up for the Job Market" [April 9] would have been just as valid in 1943, when I graduated from Curtis Institute of Music, as it is today. My experience in this area may be useful to current graduates. I have been involved in a self-imposed double-degree occupation for about 50 years. Living in a cesspool of uncertainty is the best way I can describe the free-lance musician's life then and now. At this point, I decided to become a CPA. Ironically, the better I became at accounting, the more work I received in music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1993
March 14th's issue of Calendar provided some radical food for thought for us hard-core musical theater buffs. Patrick Pacheco's cover story on Julie Andrews was a revelation and a joy to read. His adroit "take" on Broadway's once and future queen was an exceptionally canny one too. Like Streisand, Andrews is an original , and just a trifle enigmatic. An ageless, gutsy wonder of a woman, she's always spreadin' her wings, tryin' new things, to quote from a song she wrote for her Nashville collection.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Chris Barton, Tribune Newspapers
Not unlike its counterpart rock 'n' roll, memorable jazz novels occupy a pretty slim shelf at the local bookstore. Though the music has been gracefully spun into fiction by Roddy Doyle, Michael Ondaatje and - most distinctively - Rafi Zabor in the surreal, ursine-centric "The Bear Comes Home," it's a fringe topic for the most part. Maybe that's because when people want to read about jazz, the characters behind the real story are rich enough to transcend any fiction - or maybe it's just a reflection of how well-meaning writers can run into trouble once they start putting into words something as ephemeral and personal as a saxophone solo.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
For someone who's never directed a movie before, Kurt Markus sure has the eye of a filmmaker. His past as a successful photographer, whose work has appeared in Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone and in ad campaigns for BMW and Nike, serves him extremely well in the evocative documentary "John Mellencamp: It's About You," co-directed by Markus' son, Ian. In 2009, the Markus men, armed with Super 8 and still cameras, followed singer-songwriter John Mellencamp...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2008 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
No matter how many times we hear about musicians going over a song endlessly in the studio, some of rock 'n' roll's greatest singles have such passion and uniqueness that it's hard not to think of them as the result of a single moment of supreme inspiration. So it's intriguing to listen, on a new Chuck Berry retrospective, to a couple of early versions of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member's recordings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2006
CHRIS PASLES' article "Lining up for the Job Market" [April 9] would have been just as valid in 1943, when I graduated from Curtis Institute of Music, as it is today. My experience in this area may be useful to current graduates. I have been involved in a self-imposed double-degree occupation for about 50 years. Living in a cesspool of uncertainty is the best way I can describe the free-lance musician's life then and now. At this point, I decided to become a CPA. Ironically, the better I became at accounting, the more work I received in music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2006 | From the Washington Post
Bob Weinstock, who released some of the seminal jazz recordings of the 1950s on his independent Prestige label, died Saturday of complications from diabetes at a hospice in Boca Raton, Fla. He was 77. Smitten by jazz at an early age in New York City, Weinstock parlayed a family loan into a privately owned record company by the time he was 20.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2004 | Diane Haithman
All it takes to get in the door is a "suggested donation" of $50. But the creative forces behind an upcoming recording of Wagner's "Tristan and Isolde" -- by American singers at the National Palace of Culture in Sofia, Bulgaria -- hope that attendees at a fundraising reception this afternoon will be inspired to donate much more to the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2003 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
After finding that Orange Unified School District trustees illegally discussed a land deal behind closed doors in 2001, a judge has ordered the board to tape-record its private meetings for three years to guard against a recurrence. The Dec. 12 ruling came after an appeals court decided that an activist from outside the district had the right to pursue a case against the board. Orange County Superior Court Judge Andrew P.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2004 | Diane Haithman
All it takes to get in the door is a "suggested donation" of $50. But the creative forces behind an upcoming recording of Wagner's "Tristan and Isolde" -- by American singers at the National Palace of Culture in Sofia, Bulgaria -- hope that attendees at a fundraising reception this afternoon will be inspired to donate much more to the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1987 | BARBARA ISENBERG
What do you say to a woman who introduces herself as Cinderella's stepmother? Then again, she probably feels right at home. Just across the room, Cinderella herself is chatting with Little Red Riding Hood. The wolf is reading Stendhal, while Jack and his mother talk beanstalks. Prince Charming is loading his camera. But this is no ordinary meeting of fairy-tale fugitives. RCA is recording the original cast album for "Into the Woods," the new musical from Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
A former president of Rite Aid Corp. made secret recordings for prosecutors of two top executives now under indictment for accounting fraud at the nation's third-largest drugstore chain, court records show. On six occasions last year, Timothy Noonan taped former Chief Executive Martin Grass and former Chief Counsel Franklin Brown discussing the investigation of Rite Aid, records show.
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