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Recording Studios Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coronations of kings and outbreaks of war. Civic triumphs and cultural changes. For nearly 70 years the engineers on Melrose Avenue were ear-witnesses to it all. They recorded the West's first wireless broadcasts. They produced the pioneering radio commercials that helped shape Southern California's laid-back car culture. They helped create some of the record industry's bestsellers. But on Friday they'll switch off the last vacuum-tube amplifier and unplug the last 50-year-old audiotape console.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coronations of kings and outbreaks of war. Civic triumphs and cultural changes. For nearly 70 years the engineers on Melrose Avenue were ear-witnesses to it all. They recorded the West's first wireless broadcasts. They produced the pioneering radio commercials that helped shape Southern California's laid-back car culture. They helped create some of the record industry's bestsellers. But on Friday they'll switch off the last vacuum-tube amplifier and unplug the last 50-year-old audiotape console.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1998 | Marc Weingarten
Frank Sinatra, the Beach Boys, Michael Jackson, the Doors, Fleetwood Mac--it's no surprise that these artists, all identified to a large extent with Los Angeles, made many of their best-known recordings in studios located in the city. But what about Elvis Presley, a performer indelibly linked to Memphis, Tenn.? The King recorded many of his biggest hits, including "Jailhouse Rock" and "All Shook Up," in Los Angeles. Or the Rolling Stones, the quintessential ambassadors of Swinging London?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1998 | Marc Weingarten
Frank Sinatra, the Beach Boys, Michael Jackson, the Doors, Fleetwood Mac--it's no surprise that these artists, all identified to a large extent with Los Angeles, made many of their best-known recordings in studios located in the city. But what about Elvis Presley, a performer indelibly linked to Memphis, Tenn.? The King recorded many of his biggest hits, including "Jailhouse Rock" and "All Shook Up," in Los Angeles. Or the Rolling Stones, the quintessential ambassadors of Swinging London?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1987 | DEBRA SORRENTINO LARSON
In August, 1960, Del Shannon was working as a carpet salesman in Battle Creek, Mich., by day and singing at the HiLo Club by night. In the carpet store, the 20-year-old penned lyrics for a song that made him so rich he could have bought the store and the club several times over. The song was "Runaway." When it was released in 1961, it did just that. "Runaway" shot up to No. 1 in England and America just a few weeks after it appeared on Big Top Records.
REAL ESTATE
September 5, 1999 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Actress Farrah Fawcett has sold her five-bedroom Bel-Air home for nearly $2.7 million. Fawcett, 52, stars in the CBS movie "Silk Hope," set to air in October. She played Robert Duvall's wife in the movie "The Apostle" (1997). The former "Charlie's Angels" star and her then-husband, actor Lee Majors, bought the house in 1976. Built in 1950, the 9,000-square-foot house is on 3 acres behind gates. Fawcett has another L.A.-area home with three bedrooms in 2,300 square feet.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
Here in a noisy city that produces some of the world's sweetest sounds, you sometimes need to listen carefully to separate your rhythm from your blues, your oldies from your goodies, your hip from your hop. Tastes in music change as quickly as you can program all the FM and AM buttons on your dashboard. The recording studios of Los Angeles have served as houses of wax for everything from symphonies to surfer tunes. No one knows for sure what the public's ear will care to hear next.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ
Leon Rosen knew his customers well enough to tell you their average age, income, marital status and plenty of other details. But Rosen wanted to know even more. So three years ago, Rosen, the national marketing manager at American Isuzu Motors, began to gather information on the psyche of the Japanese auto maker's customers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1988 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Circling slowly above the noisy Friday night crowd at Croce's Restaurant Bar and Jazz Cave, ceiling fans shredded the cigarette smoke as the Joe Marillo Quartet wailed another piece. Nearing the end of the first set, Marillo arched his back and blew the heart out of John Coltrane's "Love Supreme," piercing the din and giving jazz fan Ken Harrison the kind of music he came to hear. "I've been following Joe Marillo about 20 years," Harrison said. "He's so consistent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's the end of July, and the spirit of Christmas is nowhere to be found amid the heat of summer. Or is it? Christmas in July may sound like a department store fantasy, but it's a very real event in the recording studios of Los Angeles, when performers and musicians take up the unusual task of creating the sounds that will ring throughout the months of November and December.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2003 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
Mark Kates boarded a train in Philadelphia on Sunday that brought him here for the 45th annual Grammy Awards, but the journey covered far more mental terrain. He reflected on his "ultimate experience" as a music executive -- the 1996 edition of the Grammys when his artist, Beck, won two trophies and thanked Kates from the stage -- but also contemplated his current status as one of the industry's dispossessed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2004 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
There are many paths to Grammy glory -- the world's grand concert halls, the elite recording studios of Los Angeles, Nashville's storied Music Row. But the caffeinated confines of your neighborhood Starbucks? When "Genius Loves Company," the duets album that became the final work of the late Ray Charles, garnered nominations Tuesday in the marquee Grammy categories of album and record of the year, it didn't just add to the 2004 outpouring of appreciation for the singer.
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