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Rectal Cancer

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SCIENCE
August 23, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Rates of rectal cancer in people younger than 40, although low, have been rising steadily for the last 20 years for reasons that are mystifying scientists, researchers said Sunday. Both colon cancer and rectal cancer are thought to share the same risk factors, but the incidence of colon cancer has remained steady during that period, while the incidence of rectal cancer has grown by an average of 3.8% per year, scientists reported online in the journal Cancer. "We've scoured the literature for a cause and spoken to others in the field and we haven't identified anything that is able to explain this," said Dr. Joshua Meyer of the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, the lead author of the study.
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SCIENCE
August 23, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Rates of rectal cancer in people younger than 40, although low, have been rising steadily for the last 20 years for reasons that are mystifying scientists, researchers said Sunday. Both colon cancer and rectal cancer are thought to share the same risk factors, but the incidence of colon cancer has remained steady during that period, while the incidence of rectal cancer has grown by an average of 3.8% per year, scientists reported online in the journal Cancer. "We've scoured the literature for a cause and spoken to others in the field and we haven't identified anything that is able to explain this," said Dr. Joshua Meyer of the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, the lead author of the study.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports and
Taking aspirin more than twice a week for 20 years significantly reduces the risk of developing colon and rectal cancer, according to a study published the New England Journal of Medicine. The results may signal an additional use for the over-the-counter painkiller, which already is recommended by many doctors to reduce the risk of heart disease.
NEWS
August 5, 2010
Far fewer women take hormone replacement therapy than did a decade ago, but the drugs are a mixed bag of risks and benefits, as studies occasionally point out. For women who are especially concerned about colon cancer, hormone therapy might be a good idea. A study has found that using hormone replacement therapy for any length of time cut the risk of distal colon cancer in half. The distal part of the colon is closest to the rectum. The longer women took hormone therapy, the greater the reduced risk.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | Times Wire Services
Doctors could lower the death rate from colon and rectal cancer by 30% if they checked all older Americans once every 10 years with widely available viewing scopes, researchers at Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program in Oakland report. Many health organizations already recommend routine use of this exam, known as sigmoidoscopy. However, some experts disagree, and the new research is the first large, carefully conducted study to show that it actually saves lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1991 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Citing new evidence that a combination of radiation and drugs given after surgery significantly reduces the death rate for patients with advanced rectal cancer, the federal government Wednesday urged physicians to immediately begin offering the treatment to patients. This treatment "can make a profound difference in the lives of patients and reduce the death and suffering from this kind of cancer," said Dr. Samuel Broder, the director of the U.S. National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rectal Cancer Test to Be Sold in Stores: Biomerica said that its EZ Detect home test kit to detect blood in the bowel--an early sign of rectal cancer--will be soon be sold in 700 Osco and Sav-On drugstores. The Newport Beach biotechnology company signed the agreement with American Drug Stores, parent of Osco and Sav-On. Biomerica said annual rectal cancer tests are recommended for anyone over 50 years old and those with a family history of the disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Regular use of aspirin, which already has been found to protect against heart attacks and some strokes, may also significantly lower the risk of colon and rectal cancer, Massachusetts researchers reported last week. A research team led by Lynn Rosenberg of the Boston University School of Medicine studied 1,326 patients with colon or rectal cancer and compared their intake of anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin, to 1,011 patients with other cancers and 3,880 cancer-free patients.
NEWS
August 15, 1994 | from Reuters
Aspirin, which has been shown to help reduce the risk of heart disease, also helps prevent colon cancer, a medical journal reported Sunday. A study in the Annals of Internal Medicine reported that people who had taken aspirin twice or more per week over an extended period were significantly less likely to get either colon or rectal cancer. Colon and rectal cancer are among the most common and deadly forms of cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1985 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Staff Writer
Responding to President Reagan's widely publicized surgery for colon cancer, individuals throughout the country have been calling cancer physicians and information services in record numbers. They have also been scheduling more appointments with their physicians and purchasing increased numbers of over-the-counter tests for colon cancer. Physicians and manufacturers alike say they have frequently been hard-pressed to keep up with the demand.
SCIENCE
November 26, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Maugh is a Times staff writer.
For the first time since the government began compiling records, the rate of cancer has begun to decline, marking a tipping point in the fight against the second leading cause of death among Americans. Researchers already knew that the number of cancer deaths was declining as the result of better treatment, but the drop in incidence indicates that major progress is also being made in prevention. "The drop in incidence . . . is something we have been waiting to see for a long time," Dr. Otis W.
SCIENCE
January 12, 2005 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
Adding weight to earlier findings, a study of nearly 150,000 adults has found that eating too many red and processed meats raises a person's risk for colorectal cancer by up to 50%. Meanwhile, another study of 285,526 European women has found that eating lots of fruits and vegetables does not lower a woman's risk for breast cancer, refuting some earlier studies.
HEALTH
October 25, 2004 | From Reuters
Administering chemotherapy and radiation before surgery for rectal cancer may not help patients live longer, but it produces fewer side effects than when given afterward, doctors report. The finding, also published in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, could translate into less suffering for those with rectal cancer, which affects about 42,000 people in the U.S. each year. Traditionally, doctors have performed surgery first.
NEWS
February 11, 2001 | PHILIP BRASHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When it comes to fighting cancer, not all broccoli is created equal. Broccoli contains a compound, glucoraphanin, believed to aid in preventing some types of cancer. But the Agriculture Department studied 71 types of broccoli plants and found a 30-fold difference in the amounts of glucoraphanin. Some had virtually none of it. The varieties of broccoli typically sold in supermarkets do not vary that much, but they do differ.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2000 | ANN CONWAY
Forget bellying up to the bar or gulping down barbecued ribs. Guests at the Art of Dining benefit that raised $500,000 for the Orange County Museum of Art celebrated the West in style, sipping fine wines and dining on beef tenderloin marinated in molasses and black pepper.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Eating lots of fiber does not appear to protect people from colon cancer, according to an ongoing study of 88,000 women that contradicts federal dietary guidelines and will surprise many a grudging bran consumer in mid-bite. In the 16-year study by Harvard researchers, women who consumed a substantial 25 grams of fiber daily had the same risk of colon or rectal cancer as did women consuming a meager 10 grams. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
Taking aspirin more than twice a week for 20 years significantly reduces the risk of developing colon and rectal cancer, according to a study published the New England Journal of Medicine. The results may signal an additional use for the over-the-counter painkiller, which already is recommended by many doctors to reduce the risk of heart disease. From 1984 to 1992, Dr.
OPINION
September 10, 1995
How good it is, in an age of high-tech and high-cost health care, to find that there are still plenty of simple, cheap things that can be done to help ward off illnesses that are not just life-threatening but often enormously expensive to treat. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and prevention that costs next to nothing is especially valuable. The old folk wisdom about eating more "roughage"--today we call it fiber--now has solid scientific support.
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