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Recycling Black Dollars Organization

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1995
Cal State Northridge Police Chief Edward Harrison was among African American law enforcement leaders honored by Recycling Black Dollars, a community-based business organization, at a recent luncheon. "We are extremely proud of the work Chief Harrison has done on this campus," said CSUN President Blenda J. Wilson in a prepared statement. "This award is a testament to his 20 years of police experience and personal dedication to excellence."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1996
One hundred black-owned businesses in the Crenshaw district and Inglewood have started displaying banners to encourage residents to spend their dollars near home. The signs read "Support the Businesses in Our Community" and are part of the efforts of Recycling Black Dollars, an Inglewood nonprofit group. "It's designed to say . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1996
In a move to improve spending in the African American community, an Inglewood-based advocacy group has started issuing scrip redeemable at businesses in the black community and at establishments that hire from the area. Recycling Black Dollars kicked off its scrip campaign last week and so far more than 100 businesses have signed up to participate. Nearly $1 million in scrip has been printed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1996
In a move to improve spending in the African American community, an Inglewood-based advocacy group has started issuing scrip redeemable at businesses in the black community and at establishments that hire from the area. Recycling Black Dollars kicked off its scrip campaign last week and so far more than 100 businesses have signed up to participate. Nearly $1 million in scrip has been printed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1996
One hundred black-owned businesses in the Crenshaw district and Inglewood have started displaying banners to encourage residents to spend their dollars near home. The signs read "Support the Businesses in Our Community" and are part of the efforts of Recycling Black Dollars, an Inglewood nonprofit group. "It's designed to say . . .
NEWS
July 25, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
He is arguably the nation's most influential African American televangelist, but for many years, says Pastor Frederick K.C. Price of Crenshaw Christian Center, a lot of blacks "thought I was white." Price, whose Vermont Avenue church is the nation's biggest religious sanctuary, with more than 10,000 seats, eschews the traditional black church's "emotionalism." He prefers opera to gospel music.
NEWS
February 8, 1997 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming that "enough is enough," three local African American groups led by the Beverly Hills/Hollywood chapter of the NAACP on Friday launched an attack against television comedies that portray blacks in a buffoonish manner. Billie J.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Muhammad Nassardeen pumps his gas at a black-owned gas station, has his teeth cleaned by a black dentist and drops his clothes off at a black-owned cleaners. On the back of his car is a license plate frame bearing the slogan: "Respect and Protect the Black Dollar." When Nassardeen does stray into a white-owned business, such as a recent trip to Circuit City to purchase stereo equipment, he seeks out a black salesman.
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | DARRYL FEARS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a Bible study class at his family's Moreno Valley church, Timothy Morris, like any new kid in town, was desperately trying to show he belonged. The teacher had asked the 30-odd youngsters to volunteer for parts in a play about the trial of a persecuted Christian. So Timothy, seated on a carpeted concrete floor with his brown body reclining against a glossy white wall, thrust his left hand high. Timothy hoped to be selected for a role as one of several surly reporters, and was overlooked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1995
Cal State Northridge Police Chief Edward Harrison was among African American law enforcement leaders honored by Recycling Black Dollars, a community-based business organization, at a recent luncheon. "We are extremely proud of the work Chief Harrison has done on this campus," said CSUN President Blenda J. Wilson in a prepared statement. "This award is a testament to his 20 years of police experience and personal dedication to excellence."
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