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Recycling Contracts

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NEWS
April 1, 1994 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In its first review of a major new environmental law, the California Supreme Court held Thursday that cities cannot prevent households or companies from selling their recyclable trash directly to private companies. The 5-2 ruling limits the ability of cities to entice garbage companies into the recycling business by promising them exclusive rights to the most valuable of recyclable materials.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Breaking his forced silence for the first time, former Police Chief John R. Robertson calmly accused city officials Friday of destroying his career to thwart an investigation of a fraud scandal involving the city's trash and recycling companies. "There is no doubt in my mind I am being terminated for doing my job," Robertson said at his attorney's office in Santa Ana.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1997
The Times rightfully recognizes that the investigation of Orange's recycling contract needs to come to its conclusion (editorial, Nov. 14). I heartily concur. I think it's important, though, to remind Orange residents and our neighbors where we stand today. Remember that the Orange Police Department started the investigation of Orange Resource Recovery Systems in April. In August, the Orange County district attorney took the entire investigation over from the department. Our three investigators still on the case are now part of the district attorney's team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1997
The Times rightfully recognizes that the investigation of Orange's recycling contract needs to come to its conclusion (editorial, Nov. 14). I heartily concur. I think it's important, though, to remind Orange residents and our neighbors where we stand today. Remember that the Orange Police Department started the investigation of Orange Resource Recovery Systems in April. In August, the Orange County district attorney took the entire investigation over from the department. Our three investigators still on the case are now part of the district attorney's team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1991 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bid to increase the quantity of recyclable trash collected from Ventura residents, the City Council plans tonight to consider revamping its contract with its recycling contractor. E.J. Harrison & Sons Inc. has been falling short of its quota for recyclable trash, and forced to pay hefty fines for failing to meet the city's contract requirements, said Terry Adelman, city finance director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1990 | CARLOS V. LOZANO
The Simi Valley City Council voted Monday to enter into an agreement with American Simi-Rubbish Co. to operate the city's soon-to-be expanded curbside recycling program, which will include 13,000 households. The council voted 5 to 0 to approve a one-year contract with the sanitation company, with an option to extend for another year. The cost to the city will be $8,332 per month.
NEWS
October 19, 1989
The La Canada Flintridge City Council on Monday approved a contract for a voluntary curbside recycling program to begin early next year. Under the $71,148-per-year contract with Circo Recyclers of Newark, Calif., each household will be given a 14-gallon plastic box for newspapers, glass bottles, plastic containers and metal cans. The recycling bins will be collected the same day as trash, beginning Jan. 2. The program will be financed by a monthly fee of 92 cents per household.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A family company's grip on the lucrative trash industry in north Orange County could get even tighter today if city officials endorse a plan to award Taormina Industries a $5-million annual contract to recycle the city's garbage. With the Fullerton contract, the Anaheim-based company would own the rights to recycle or collect trash in seven North County cities, including Anaheim, Brea and Yorba Linda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Breaking his forced silence for the first time, former Police Chief John R. Robertson calmly accused city officials Friday of destroying his career to thwart an investigation of a fraud scandal involving the city's trash and recycling companies. "There is no doubt in my mind I am being terminated for doing my job," Robertson said at his attorney's office in Santa Ana.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In its first review of a major new environmental law, the California Supreme Court held Thursday that cities cannot prevent households or companies from selling their recyclable trash directly to private companies. The 5-2 ruling limits the ability of cities to entice garbage companies into the recycling business by promising them exclusive rights to the most valuable of recyclable materials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A family company's grip on the lucrative trash industry in north Orange County could get even tighter today if city officials endorse a plan to award Taormina Industries a $5-million annual contract to recycle the city's garbage. With the Fullerton contract, the Anaheim-based company would own the rights to recycle or collect trash in seven North County cities, including Anaheim, Brea and Yorba Linda.
NEWS
January 9, 1992
The City Council has voted unanimously to maintain an agreement with Circo Recyclers, extending a curbside waste collection program until January, 1993. Under the agreement approved Monday, the city's costs will be lowered from $102,114 to $92,875.44 per year because of the elimination of direct billing to residents, the decrease in single-family households and an increase in the types of materials collected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1991 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bid to increase the quantity of recyclable trash collected from Ventura residents, the City Council plans tonight to consider revamping its contract with its recycling contractor. E.J. Harrison & Sons Inc. has been falling short of its quota for recyclable trash, and forced to pay hefty fines for failing to meet the city's contract requirements, said Terry Adelman, city finance director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1990 | CARLOS V. LOZANO
The Simi Valley City Council voted Monday to enter into an agreement with American Simi-Rubbish Co. to operate the city's soon-to-be expanded curbside recycling program, which will include 13,000 households. The council voted 5 to 0 to approve a one-year contract with the sanitation company, with an option to extend for another year. The cost to the city will be $8,332 per month.
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