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Recycling Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1993
In a move to make use of thousands of discarded plastic bottles collected by the city's recycling program, Los Angeles officials have directed a private contractor to use them in making a protective liner under the Lopez Canyon dump above Lakeview Terrace. The project to protect ground water beneath the dump will absorb about 800,000 of the two-liter beverage containers that the city collects in its residential curbside recycling program, according to a spokesman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
August 12, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
It seemed like a simple exercise for the Home section: Publish a short weekly feature called "Can I Recycle" that said whether a particular item — drycleaner bag, cereal box liner, milk carton — should go in the recycling bin or the trash can. But figuring out what's recyclable and what's not proved to be surprisingly complicated. The system seemed to discourage the very endeavor it was trying to encourage. Some plastics were labeled "compostable" but were not, in fact, compostable.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1993 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move to make use of thousands of discarded plastic bottles collected by the city's recycling program, Los Angeles officials have directed a private contractor to use them in making a protective liner under the Lopez Canyon dump above Lake View Terrace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2005 | James Ricci, Times Staff Writer
On a warm, sunny Tuesday morning, city recycle truck No. 36572 huffs and bucks through the alleys and streets of North Hollywood. Behind the wheel on the right side of the cab, Ron Cole Jr. eyeballs the next blue bin on the street and pulls abreast of it. Tapping a video game-like control panel, he extends a mechanical grabber, grasps the bin and dumps its contents into the truck's receiving well.
HOME & GARDEN
August 12, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
It seemed like a simple exercise for the Home section: Publish a short weekly feature called "Can I Recycle" that said whether a particular item — drycleaner bag, cereal box liner, milk carton — should go in the recycling bin or the trash can. But figuring out what's recyclable and what's not proved to be surprisingly complicated. The system seemed to discourage the very endeavor it was trying to encourage. Some plastics were labeled "compostable" but were not, in fact, compostable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2005 | James Ricci, Times Staff Writer
On a warm, sunny Tuesday morning, city recycle truck No. 36572 huffs and bucks through the alleys and streets of North Hollywood. Behind the wheel on the right side of the cab, Ron Cole Jr. eyeballs the next blue bin on the street and pulls abreast of it. Tapping a video game-like control panel, he extends a mechanical grabber, grasps the bin and dumps its contents into the truck's receiving well.
HOME & GARDEN
August 13, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
When South Pasadena homeowners recycle, it's as easy as throwing their tuna cans and soda bottles into the trash can along with their food scraps and meat wrappers. It's called mixed waste processing, and it's an alternative way some cities have tried to increase recycling rates. In 2000, just 6% of South Pasadena's single-family residential waste was being recycled under a voluntary program that had residents sort recycling into a separate container. That percentage shot up to 25% in 2001 after the city decided to let waste and recycling go into one bin bound for a so-called dirty MRF, or mixed-waste materials recovery facility, where sorting equipment and trained workers separate paper, glass, plastic, metal and other commodities on the back end instead of the front.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
In an attempt to encourage recycling, the Los Angeles City Council imposed a fee Wednesday on private firms that haul trash from businesses and apartment buildings to landfills. The council decided that, for at least the next six months, the city will charge haulers 10% of what they charge their customers. Haulers can reduce the amount by sorting out recyclables beforehand, city officials said.
OPINION
December 7, 2005
Re "Recycling in Los Angeles: Bin There, Doing That," Dec. 5 Recycling is a worthwhile endeavor -- less trash is sent to landfills. Too bad the city does not distribute blue and green bins too, nor does it collect recycled waste from apartment buildings and condominium associations. I own a condo and dutifully pay property taxes, not an insignificant amount when you've recently purchased a home. Why aren't some of these funds appropriated to encourage a "recycling for all" program?
NEWS
October 2, 1992 | CONNIE KOENENN
When it comes to big-city recycling, Los Angeles is doing the nation's best job, proclaims City and State Magazine in announcing its third annual recycling awards. "We had about 100 entries," says Ellen Shubart, editor of the magazine for government leaders. "Los Angeles won in the category of 500,000 population and up." The judges considered scope and scale of programs, percentage of waste diverted from landfills, public education and how recyclables are being reused, she says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1993
In a move to make use of thousands of discarded plastic bottles collected by the city's recycling program, Los Angeles officials have directed a private contractor to use them in making a protective liner under the Lopez Canyon dump above Lakeview Terrace. The project to protect ground water beneath the dump will absorb about 800,000 of the two-liter beverage containers that the city collects in its residential curbside recycling program, according to a spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1993 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move to make use of thousands of discarded plastic bottles collected by the city's recycling program, Los Angeles officials have directed a private contractor to use them in making a protective liner under the Lopez Canyon dump above Lake View Terrace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Stressing the importance of the "three Rs"--reduction, reuse and recycling--Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alarcon proposed this week that the city allocate $100,000 toward the construction of an ecology museum in the northeast Valley. A second motion by Alarcon asked for the release of $623,000 in previously allocated funds for the purchase of a 1 1/2-acre parcel at 12002 Osborne St.
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