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Recycling Orange County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1990 | WENDY PAULSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a state-mandated deadline ordering communities to produce less garbage, officials of South County cities are scrambling to put together a recycling program that will cross city lines. Plans discussed so far include establishing a regional curbside recycling program and creating a local processing center to collect the tons of garbage that could be diverted from landfills.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1990 | WENDY PAULSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a state-mandated deadline ordering communities to produce less garbage, officials of South County cities are scrambling to put together a recycling program that will cross city lines. Plans discussed so far include establishing a regional curbside recycling program and creating a local processing center to collect the tons of garbage that could be diverted from landfills.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2001
Re "Strike Halts Trash Pickup in Much of O.C.," Sept. 2: I find it absolutely appalling and disgusting that state workers in Minnesota and sanitation workers in Orange County chose to strike. Their timing was poor considering the country is at war and this is not a time for selfishness. In this rapidly declining economy they should be lucky to have a job. Skip Houston Laguna Beach Striking garbage collectors in Orange County were unhappy with their present average wages of $42,000 per year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Grand Jury on Wednesday released a sweeping set of recommendations aimed at cutting in half by 2004 the debris and trash floating in harbors in Dana Point, Newport Beach and Huntington Beach. The report said county officials should give $225,000 to the three cities in the next three years to achieve the cleanup. During the first rainstorms every year, untold amounts of debris are washed from storm drains and channels into each of the county's harbors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1991 | APRIL JACKSON / Los Angeles Times
The sign at a dump site at Charles W. TeWinkle Memorial Park in Costa Mesa Thursday read: "Wanted: Used Christmas Trees. Deposit Here." Inside, maintenance workers were bracing for an anticipated deluge of discarded Christmas trees that the environmentally conscious are expected to cart to the site for recycling.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Balloons and a marching band marked the beginning this week of Glendale's voluntary citywide recycling program--the largest in Southern California--despite a glitch that left dozens of barrels of tin and aluminium cans sitting uncollected at curb sides. Glendale city officials said about 20% of the residents in La Crescenta participated Monday in the first day of voluntary collections by contributing cans, glass containers and newspapers.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1988 | SIOK-HIAN TAY, Times Staff Writer
As an environmental control specialist for Lockheed Aeronautical Systems in Burbank, Terry Carberry spends plenty of time worrying about how to dispose of the half a million gallons of machine coolant from three manufacturing plants each year. Classified by California's 1976 Hazardous Waste Control Act as toxic waste that can only be dumped at a shrinking number of Class I landfills, the fluid was costing Lockheed about $500,000 a year to dispose of and replace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1987 | CARLA RIVERA, Times Staff Writer
Verdun Harris was nearly brained not too long ago by a beer bottle tossed carelessly at a trash bin on Sunset Beach. Fortunately, Harris ducked in time, and the bottle landed harmlessly to his side as he was collecting aluminum cans from the bin. Harris, a retired roofer, had already covered about 50 yards of the sandy beach in his search for cans and any other collectibles that caught his metal detector's fancy. But he didn't bother with the beer bottle. Not then.
NEWS
March 29, 1992 | JIM NEWTON and MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California's waste recycling law, designed to head off a looming garbage glut, is plunging Orange County's landfill system toward bankruptcy and forcing officials to contemplate huge residential rate hikes as a way to save it. The logic behind recycling--to conserve resources and reduce the amount of garbage being buried in the state's dwindling landfill system--remains sound. But Orange County residents face a frustrating Catch-22: The more they recycle, the less garbage goes to landfills.
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