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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1989
As an opening-night ticket holder to the Red Army Chorus performance at the Shrine Auditorium, I would like to offer a comment. To our new Armenian neighbors, welcome to our democratic experiment. I am pleased that you are enjoying the freedoms of speech and peaceable assembly that our society provides. No doubt you have chosen to join with us because of a heightened appreciation of these special freedoms. But the blockage of the Shrine Auditorium on opening night did nothing to enhance these liberties (Metro, Nov. 4)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1989
Re Donna Perlmutter's critique of the Red Army Chorus: I am convinced that with the ingrained attitudes and low level of public awareness in the "Free" World, the Cold War will never end ("The Red Army Chorus--A Show of Strength, Inside, Outside Shrine," Nov. 4). It was a display of mass rudeness for the Armenians--"1,000 protesting emigres"--to insult the members of the Red Army Chorus, guests of the United States. It is a sad commentary on the brave new world when art has to be used as a political weapon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1989 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
It was supposed to be an evening of cultural exchange--the famed Red Army Chorus making its much-ballyhooed Los Angeles debut on this first American tour. But who could have known that exchange would take place on the street outside Shrine Auditorium? Or last there for three hours? Or include the rousing, spirited songs of an Armenian homeland under siege, as performed by more than 1,000 protesting emigres from that Soviet Republic?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1989
I was fortunate enough to attend a performance of the Red Army Song & Dance Ensemble at the Shrine Auditorium. In spite of the pickets, I enjoyed the entire presentation more than anything I have seen in ages. Tremendous, to say the least! Glasnost not to be excluded, however, I found it incredulous that the program began with "The Star-Spangled Banner" and concluded with "God Bless America" while slipping in a song in the middle titled "Do the Russians Want War?" Attempted partially in English no less.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1989 | DARRELL DAWSEY and and BETH KLEID, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Police Department was unprepared for the large Armenian protest against the Red Army Chorus that temporarily shut down the Shrine Auditorium--even though preliminary police intelligence reports had accurately predicted a turnout of about 1,000 demonstrators, a police official said Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1989 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Bwystrey! Bwystrey!" Viktor (The Briefcase) Kadinov grinned broadly as he hollered the Russian equivalent of "Faster! Faster!" at the flashing lights, whistles and up-tempo rendition of "Camptown Races" that took over inside the Coin Castle slot palace. For an hour or so, Kadinov, financial administrator of the 175-member Red Army Chorus and dance ensemble, had been feeding quarters into the one-armed bandits in downtown Vegas' Glitter Gulch. He wasn't alone. Ensemble director Col.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1989
Re Donna Perlmutter's critique of the Red Army Chorus: I am convinced that with the ingrained attitudes and low level of public awareness in the "Free" World, the Cold War will never end ("The Red Army Chorus--A Show of Strength, Inside, Outside Shrine," Nov. 4). It was a display of mass rudeness for the Armenians--"1,000 protesting emigres"--to insult the members of the Red Army Chorus, guests of the United States. It is a sad commentary on the brave new world when art has to be used as a political weapon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1989
A group of about 1,000 chanting Armenian demonstrators blocked the entrances to Los Angeles' Shrine Auditorium on Thursday evening, delaying a concert by the 175-member Soviet Red Army Chorus and dance ensemble for more than two hours. "We're trying to bring to public attention that the Red Army, instead of protecting its citizens, is firing on people," said Berdj Karapetian, a spokesman for the Armenia National Committee, one of two groups protesting Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Armenian demonstrators marched outside the Shrine Auditorium again on Saturday, the third straight day of protest at a four-day engagement of the Soviet Red Army Chorus and dance ensemble. About 80 demonstrators chanted and carried signs protesting the killing of Armenians by soldiers in the Soviet Union. But police kept protesters at bay, limiting their marching to the south side of the auditorium, along Jefferson Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1989 | DARRELL DAWSEY and BETH KLEID, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For the second night in a row Armenian protesters marched outside the Shrine Auditorium where the Soviet Red Army Chorus and dance ensemble appeared, but on Friday police were prepared and demonstrators were unable to delay the concert as they had on opening night. Barricades blocked streets leading to the auditorium and officers would only permit ticket holders or those intending to buy tickets to pass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Armenian demonstrators marched outside the Shrine Auditorium again on Saturday, the third straight day of protest at a four-day engagement of the Soviet Red Army Chorus and dance ensemble. About 80 demonstrators chanted and carried signs protesting the killing of Armenians by soldiers in the Soviet Union. But police kept protesters at bay, limiting their marching to the south side of the auditorium, along Jefferson Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1989 | DARRELL DAWSEY and and BETH KLEID, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Police Department was unprepared for the large Armenian protest against the Red Army Chorus that temporarily shut down the Shrine Auditorium--even though preliminary police intelligence reports had accurately predicted a turnout of about 1,000 demonstrators, a police official said Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1989 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
It was supposed to be an evening of cultural exchange--the famed Red Army Chorus making its much-ballyhooed Los Angeles debut on this first American tour. But who could have known that exchange would take place on the street outside Shrine Auditorium? Or last there for three hours? Or include the rousing, spirited songs of an Armenian homeland under siege, as performed by more than 1,000 protesting emigres from that Soviet Republic?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1989 | DARRELL DAWSEY and BETH KLEID, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For the second night in a row Armenian protesters marched outside the Shrine Auditorium where the Soviet Red Army Chorus and dance ensemble appeared, but on Friday police were prepared and demonstrators were unable to delay the concert as they had on opening night. Barricades blocked streets leading to the auditorium and officers would only permit ticket holders or those intending to buy tickets to pass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1989
A group of about 1,000 chanting Armenian demonstrators blocked the entrances to Los Angeles' Shrine Auditorium on Thursday evening, delaying a concert by the 175-member Soviet Red Army Chorus and dance ensemble for more than two hours. "We're trying to bring to public attention that the Red Army, instead of protecting its citizens, is firing on people," said Berdj Karapetian, a spokesman for the Armenia National Committee, one of two groups protesting Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1989 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Bwystrey! Bwystrey!" Viktor (The Briefcase) Kadinov grinned broadly as he hollered the Russian equivalent of "Faster! Faster!" at the flashing lights, whistles and up-tempo rendition of "Camptown Races" that took over inside the Coin Castle slot palace. For an hour or so, Kadinov, financial administrator of the 175-member Red Army Chorus and dance ensemble, had been feeding quarters into the one-armed bandits in downtown Vegas' Glitter Gulch. He wasn't alone. Ensemble director Col.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1989 | GERARD GARZA, San Diego County Arts Editor
After weeks of negotiation, the status of the Red Army Choir's appearance in San Diego during the Soviet Arts Festival has been settled, although not to everyone's satisfaction. The 200 member-plus performing troupe, known formally as the Alexandrov Red Army Song & Dance Ensemble, will perform at the San Diego Sports Arena during, but not as part of, the Soviet Arts Festival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1989 | GERARD GARZA, San Diego County Arts Editor
After weeks of negotiation, the status of the Red Army Choir's appearance in San Diego during the Soviet Arts Festival has been settled, although not to everyone's satisfaction. The 200 member-plus performing troupe, known formally as the Alexandrov Red Army Song & Dance Ensemble, will perform at the San Diego Sports Arena during, but not as part of, the Soviet Arts Festival.
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