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SPORTS
August 7, 1988 | United Press International
Red Barber recalls a time when people thought night baseball would never work. He should know. Not only was he there, he broadcast the first night game in major-league history. "I know most of the people in baseball did not think night ball would be successful," Barber told UPI in an exclusive interview. "They didn't think the lights would be good enough. There were a lot of old liners who said baseball was meant to be played in the daytime. The moment the lights came on, everyone was convinced."
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SPORTS
May 15, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
We recently asked you to list your choices for the 10 greatest Dodgers of all time, and vote you did, as we received an amazing 12,231 ballots. So many people voted that we have decided to expand the list from the top 10 to the top 20. Each weekday at 11 a.m. PDT, a new person will be listed as we count down all 20. Remember, any Dodger, Brooklyn or L.A., was eligible, including managers, owners, announcers, etc. Points were assigned based on where you listed the person on the ballot.
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SPORTS
October 25, 1992 | MAL FLORENCE
Curt Smith compares the announcing styles of the late Red Barber and Mel Allen in his book, "Voices of the Game:" "Barber was white wine, crepes suzette, and bluegrass music. Allen was beer, hot dogs and the United States Marine Band. "Barber's voice was cultured, silken; Allen's voice was extraordinary. Barber etched; like Astaire, Sinatra, he was a balladeer." Trivia time: Name the only Pacific 10 team that hasn't played in the Rose Bowl game?
SPORTS
August 22, 2010 | By Dylan Hernandez
Vin Scully said he had his wife's blessing to return for another season as the voice of the Dodgers. Then he heard that the Dodgers had picked up journeyman catcher Rod Barajas in a waiver deal. "That was the clincher," Scully said, drawing laughs from the crowd of reporters who surrounded him in the press box named in his honor. So Scully will be back next year for his 62nd season with the Dodgers. He announced Sunday morning that he will continue to call their home games, as well as road games against National League West opponents.
NEWS
November 25, 1990 | BRENT KALLESTAD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Millions of Americans tune in weekly to hear Walter (Red) Barber on National Public Radio, 24 years after he signed off his final broadcast of a New York Yankees game. "I don't enjoy getting up at 5:45 on Friday mornings, but I enjoy doing (the show)," he said. "It's something I look forward to." Although Barber usually discusses sports with NPR "Morning Edition" host Bob Edwards, he is comfortable with nearly any subject.
SPORTS
October 23, 1992 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Red Barber, one of the most influential figures in early major league baseball broadcasting and the voice of the Brooklyn Dodgers in their heyday, died Thursday in a Tallahassee, Fla., hospital of pneumonia and age-related kidney complications. He was 84. Earlier this month, Barber underwent surgery for an intestinal blockage at Tallahassee Regional Memorial Medical Center and had been in critical condition since.
SPORTS
February 17, 1988
Florida Secretary of State Jim Smith will present Baseball Hall of Fame announcer Red Barber with a resolution declaring Wednesday, Barber's 80th birthday, "Red Barber Day" in the state.
SPORTS
October 31, 1992
Without sentimentalizing or deifying the man, Thomas Bonk let us see why Red Barber (Oct. 23) was a Hall of Fame man and sports figure. Baseball announcing when done at the level of a Red Barber or a Vin Scully is an art and you have done justice to this great artist. G.P. SHEEHY La Crescenta
SPORTS
October 15, 1992
Red Barber, a pioneering baseball broadcaster who broke in Vin Scully with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1950 and now does a popular National Public Radio show, was hospitalized in Tallahassee, Fla., after surgery for an intestinal blockage. Barber, 84, was "making some slow progress" but remained in intensive care and in critical condition, a hospital spokesman said.
SPORTS
October 3, 2001 | DAVID J. HALBERSTAM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's arguably the most famous call in sports. The recording has been replayed countlessly for half a century. On Oct. 3, 1951, Russ Hodges, the radio announcer for the New York Giants, put his stamp on history with an avalanche of verbal hysteria. His heartfelt call on "The Shot Heard Round the World" captured what the grainy black and white film couldn't, the emotion of one of the city's most dramatic baseball moments: "Branca pitches and Bobby takes a strike called on the inside corner.
BOOKS
February 20, 1994 | DICK RORABACK
FRIDAYS WITH RED: A Radio Friendship by Bob Edwards (Simon & Schuster: $21; 240 pp.) In his latter years, you still would have had to get up pretty early in the morning to put one over on Red Barber--7:35 a.m., to be exact; Fridays. Even at that hour it was hard to ruffle the self-styled Ol' Redhead.
SPORTS
October 31, 1992
Without sentimentalizing or deifying the man, Thomas Bonk let us see why Red Barber (Oct. 23) was a Hall of Fame man and sports figure. Baseball announcing when done at the level of a Red Barber or a Vin Scully is an art and you have done justice to this great artist. G.P. SHEEHY La Crescenta
SPORTS
October 25, 1992 | MAL FLORENCE
Curt Smith compares the announcing styles of the late Red Barber and Mel Allen in his book, "Voices of the Game:" "Barber was white wine, crepes suzette, and bluegrass music. Allen was beer, hot dogs and the United States Marine Band. "Barber's voice was cultured, silken; Allen's voice was extraordinary. Barber etched; like Astaire, Sinatra, he was a balladeer." Trivia time: Name the only Pacific 10 team that hasn't played in the Rose Bowl game?
SPORTS
October 24, 1992 | MAL FLORENCE
The late Red Barber is remembered as the ultimate professional, one who even defied baseball superstition as a radio announcer. Barber worked a 1947 World Series game between the Yankees and Dodgers at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, where New York pitcher Bill Bevens was working on a no-hitter. When Barber took over for his radio partner, Mel Allen, the voice of the Yankees, in the middle innings, he calmly told his audience the Dodger totals: one run, two errors, no hits.
BOOKS
February 20, 1994 | DICK RORABACK
FRIDAYS WITH RED: A Radio Friendship by Bob Edwards (Simon & Schuster: $21; 240 pp.) In his latter years, you still would have had to get up pretty early in the morning to put one over on Red Barber--7:35 a.m., to be exact; Fridays. Even at that hour it was hard to ruffle the self-styled Ol' Redhead.
SPORTS
May 15, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
We recently asked you to list your choices for the 10 greatest Dodgers of all time, and vote you did, as we received an amazing 12,231 ballots. So many people voted that we have decided to expand the list from the top 10 to the top 20. Each weekday at 11 a.m. PDT, a new person will be listed as we count down all 20. Remember, any Dodger, Brooklyn or L.A., was eligible, including managers, owners, announcers, etc. Points were assigned based on where you listed the person on the ballot.
SPORTS
October 23, 1992 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Red Barber, one of the most influential figures in early major league baseball broadcasting and the voice of the Brooklyn Dodgers in their heyday, died Thursday in a Tallahassee, Fla., hospital of pneumonia and age-related kidney complications. He was 84. Earlier this month, Barber underwent surgery for an intestinal blockage at Tallahassee Regional Memorial Medical Center and had been in critical condition since.
SPORTS
October 15, 1992
Red Barber, a pioneering baseball broadcaster who broke in Vin Scully with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1950 and now does a popular National Public Radio show, was hospitalized in Tallahassee, Fla., after surgery for an intestinal blockage. Barber, 84, was "making some slow progress" but remained in intensive care and in critical condition, a hospital spokesman said.
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