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NEWS
July 4, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a 72-hour programming binge, Derek Fugasu and his team of software developers had hit a wall. They had to deliver a working model of a hopelessly botched e-commerce engine in 16 hours, and some team members were beginning to babble. At 4 a.m., long after the Santa Monica bars once favored by upscale Internet workers have locked up, Fugasu dragged himself down the street into the shock-white lighting of an all-night 7-Eleven.
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SPORTS
March 10, 2006 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
Denver billionaire Philip F. Anschutz on Thursday recouped at least some of the money he has invested in Major League Soccer by selling the MetroStars to Austrian businessman Dietrich "Didi" Mateschitz in a deal worth an estimated $50 million. In announcing the purchase, Mateschitz said the team would be renamed Red Bull New York, after the energy drink company he founded, which has sales of more than $1.5 billion a year.
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SPORTS
March 10, 2006 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
Denver billionaire Philip F. Anschutz on Thursday recouped at least some of the money he has invested in Major League Soccer by selling the MetroStars to Austrian businessman Dietrich "Didi" Mateschitz in a deal worth an estimated $50 million. In announcing the purchase, Mateschitz said the team would be renamed Red Bull New York, after the energy drink company he founded, which has sales of more than $1.5 billion a year.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a 72-hour programming binge, Derek Fugasu and his team of software developers had hit a wall. They had to deliver a working model of a hopelessly botched e-commerce engine in 16 hours, and some team members were beginning to babble. At 4 a.m., long after the Santa Monica bars once favored by upscale Internet workers have locked up, Fugasu dragged himself down the street into the shock-white lighting of an all-night 7-Eleven.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
Felix Baumgartner's attempt to set the world's free-fall record at 23 miles has been postponed to Tuesday from Monday because of a cold front with gusty winds near Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner will be carried skyward inside a pressurized capsule suspended from the largest balloon ever used in a manned flight. Officials said that an attempt at the feat, the longest and fastest free fall , can be made only if winds on the ground are slower than 2 mph. Wearing a newly designed pressurized suit and helmet, the Austrian native will test the threshold of his equipment as scientists, aerospace engineers, the Air Force and NASA study what it shows about the limits and capabilities of the human body bailing out from aircraft at ultra-high altitudes.
MAGAZINE
September 18, 2005 | Dan Neil
The governing principle of this column is to test-drive pop culture, which is to say, not just muse upon it but reach out and touch it, try it out, consume it. I offer this by way of explaining why I have just ingested a 16-ounce can of Rockstar Energy Drink--which I wouldn't have done otherwise except at gunpoint--and why now I don't feel so wonderful.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Teetering 23 miles above the New Mexico desert, Felix Baumgartner plans to leap head first into the abyss and become the first free-falling human to break the sound barrier as he plummets to the ground. The feat, which will put his life on the line and push his body to the limit, is scheduled to take place shortly after dawn Monday when he falls from 120,000 feet in the air. JUMP DELAYED: The attempt by Felix Baumgartner to set the world's free-fall record at 23 miles has been postponed from Monday to Tuesday because of a cold front with gusty winds near Roswell, N.M. Wearing a newly designed pressurized suit and helmet, the Austria native will test the threshold of his equipment as scientists, aerospace engineers, the Air Force and NASA study what it shows about the limits and capabilities of the human body bailing out from aircraft at ultra-high altitudes.
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