Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRed Cabbage
IN THE NEWS

Red Cabbage

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
October 28, 2010
  Braised red cabbage Total time: 1 hour, 45 minutes, plus marinating time Servings: 10 Note: Recipe (and commentary) from Stefan Richter of Stefan's at L.A. Farm 2 pounds red cabbage 1/2 pound shredded apple 1 cup orange juice 1 cup apple juice 1/4 cup red wine vinegar 1/2 tablespoon salt 3 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons blackcurrant jelly or cranberry jam 1 stick cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground cloves 1 cup red wine 1/2 cup duck or bacon fat, more if desired Scant 2 cups sliced onion 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons water, divided 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1. Julienne the red cabbage into 2-inch-long strips and place in a large bowl along with the apple, orange juice, apple juice, red wine vinegar, salt, sugar, jelly, cinnamon, cloves and red wine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
December 22, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
Once I lived in a place where winter temperatures regularly dipped below freezing, and my best friend was my goose down comforter. My downstairs neighbor was a Renaissance English scholar, and every year he did the whole Dickens Christmas feast complete with goose. I had my own Christmas celebration, but he'd give me the goose fat and any of the leftovers, which I used in my New Year's Day cassoulet, prepared from Julia Child's lengthy recipe. It wasn't until I moved to sunny Southern California that I made a roast goose myself for the first time.
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
December 1, 1985 | BILL SIDNAM
Modern, "healthy" cuisines stress freshness, fiber and nutrients, and thus cabbage--especially red cabbage--finally is getting the respect it deserves. Red cabbage has been a traditionally favored vegetable in Europe, especially in Germany and Denmark, where early peasant cuisines were the basis for a treasure house of imaginative recipes based on red cabbage. In the United States, until very recently, red cabbage generally has been relegated to a decorative role; it added color to green salads.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
When you come across a recipe that calls for peeled hazelnuts, have no fear. You don't need to spend the better part of the afternoon whittling away at each one to remove those stubborn skins. Roast the nuts on a rimmed baking sheet for about 10 minutes in a 350-degree oven. When the skins have darkened and the nuts are fragrant, place the nuts on a large kitchen towel that you've dampened slightly. Rub the skins off of the hazelnuts using the towel. The steam from the nuts will loosen the skins, and they should crumble off easily.
FOOD
February 18, 1993 | ROSE DOSTI
DEAR SOS: When a friend from Arkansas came out for a visit I discovered that I had misplaced my recipe for Pretending to Be Red Cabbage From the North Woods. I used by-guess-and-by-gosh, but the recipe, though passable, was a little too sweet. My friend recognized the recipe and sent the following as taken from the North Woods Inn. We can't break down the dressing into one or two cups, however.
FOOD
July 12, 1990 | ROSE DOSTI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DEAR SOS: Try this recipe for red cabbage. It's supposed to be similar to the popular cabbage slaw served at the North Woods Restaurant in Claremont. --MRS. C.V.F. DEAR MRS. C.V.F.: We tried several times to approach the flavor of the real thing, but there is always something slightly off. I think your version is close, perhaps closest of all. But even if not, it's certainly worth trying, especially during barbecue season, when a good slaw is always welcome.
FOOD
July 8, 1993 | FAYE LEVY
Coleslaw was not high on my list of favorite dishes when I was growing up in Maryland. The mayonnaise dressings with heavy doses of sugar simply didn't appeal to me. But years later, when I was a young bride in Israel, trying to learn how to cook from books, I decided to try to make a batch. One of the books on my shelf, the 1963 edition of "The Good Housekeeping Cookbook," had 17 different versions of coleslaw. There had to be one I would like!
FOOD
May 24, 2006 | Jack Silberstein
To pickle your fancy Moessner Orchard's pickled beets and red cabbage bring a touch of the old Midwest to the Southern California table. No commercial variety can come close to the quality of these grandma's-kitchen-style condiments. The tangy beets are not too sweet and have a terrific al dente texture. They are great eaten as is, or perhaps tossed into a salad. The cabbage has aromas of spice and caraway and would pair perfectly with roast meats and potatoes (pancakes, anyone?).
FOOD
October 17, 1991 | MINNIE BERNARDINO and DONNA DEANE, TIMES FOOD STYLISTS
MENU Grilled Kielbasa With Pickled Red Cabbage Potato dumplings Pumpernickel bread Chilled chunky applesauce and gingersnaps When the hottest day of the year falls in October, it hardly seems like autumn. But far from Southern California, in the villages and cities of Europe, October means cool weather and Oktoberfest celebrations. We may not have the cool weather, but you can coax a little autumn into dinner with a simple Oktoberfest meal.
FOOD
December 22, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
Once I lived in a place where winter temperatures regularly dipped below freezing, and my best friend was my goose down comforter. My downstairs neighbor was a Renaissance English scholar, and every year he did the whole Dickens Christmas feast complete with goose. I had my own Christmas celebration, but he'd give me the goose fat and any of the leftovers, which I used in my New Year's Day cassoulet, prepared from Julia Child's lengthy recipe. It wasn't until I moved to sunny Southern California that I made a roast goose myself for the first time.
FOOD
November 3, 2012
In Austria, Switzerland and Germany, eaux de vie or schnapps are usually drunk after the meal as a kind of digestive. They are also a way of extending an enjoyable evening. They're usually served in small stemmed glasses. (Hans Reisetbauer, in fact, has worked with the Austrian glass factory Spiegelau to design a special eau de vie glass called the Quinta Essentia Glass.) The pour should be quite small, no more than about 11/2 tablespoons. If you don't have a proper eau de vie or grappa glass, a sherry glass will do just fine.
FOOD
November 26, 2010 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Purple variants of common vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus and potatoes have been increasingly popular at farmers markets in recent years, but none is as intriguing as the red Brussels sprouts just now showing up at the Santa Monica farmers market. Beautiful, tasty and different, they seem sure to make a splash. It's hard to imagine a farmer more on the prowl for novel specialty produce than Alex Weiser of Weiser Family Farms. He learned of red Brussels sprouts from Erin Eastland, executive chef of Cube Marketplace & Café, who had experimented with growing them on a rooftop in downtown Los Angeles.
FOOD
October 28, 2010
  Braised red cabbage Total time: 1 hour, 45 minutes, plus marinating time Servings: 10 Note: Recipe (and commentary) from Stefan Richter of Stefan's at L.A. Farm 2 pounds red cabbage 1/2 pound shredded apple 1 cup orange juice 1 cup apple juice 1/4 cup red wine vinegar 1/2 tablespoon salt 3 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons blackcurrant jelly or cranberry jam 1 stick cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground cloves 1 cup red wine 1/2 cup duck or bacon fat, more if desired Scant 2 cups sliced onion 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons water, divided 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1. Julienne the red cabbage into 2-inch-long strips and place in a large bowl along with the apple, orange juice, apple juice, red wine vinegar, salt, sugar, jelly, cinnamon, cloves and red wine.
FOOD
May 24, 2006 | Jack Silberstein
To pickle your fancy Moessner Orchard's pickled beets and red cabbage bring a touch of the old Midwest to the Southern California table. No commercial variety can come close to the quality of these grandma's-kitchen-style condiments. The tangy beets are not too sweet and have a terrific al dente texture. They are great eaten as is, or perhaps tossed into a salad. The cabbage has aromas of spice and caraway and would pair perfectly with roast meats and potatoes (pancakes, anyone?).
FOOD
July 2, 2003 | Cindy Dorn, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: This past weekend we had dinner at Ed & Fred's Desert Moon Restaurant in Lexington, Ky. Everything was outstanding, and their peanut coleslaw was fabulous! Can you get the recipe? Shirley Kline Rolling Hills Estates Dear Shirley: This "new American eclectic" restaurant (named for the fathers of the original partners) serves lots of contemporary sandwiches -- such as grilled salmon BLT. Chef and co-owner Doug Eifert developed this spicy-sweet Asian-influenced slaw to serve on the side.
FOOD
May 8, 2002
DEAR SOS: I am a former Southern California resident now living in Northern California. I really miss Clearman's Northwoods Inn restaurants. I know quite a few years back you published the recipe for their red cabbage salad. JUDITH CHENEY Via e-mail DEAR JUDITH: We first ran this recipe, developed by the Times Test Kitchen, in 1990. It's based on the salad from the Clearman's restaurant chain. Red Cabbage Salad Active Work Time and Total Preparation Time: 15 minutes, plus 2 hours standing 1/2 head red cabbage, cored 1/2 cup oil 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 3 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoons salt, or more to taste 1 teaspoon seasoned salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1/4 teaspoon onion powder Shred the cabbage so it is irregular, with some fine and some coarse shreds, and place in a large nonaluminum bowl.
FOOD
December 6, 2000 | DONNA DEANE
Light cooking is often fast cooking, but not always. This dish, though it takes only a little time to put together, needs a good two hours on the stove to taste its best. I like to serve it with duck and turkey sausage or one of the other flavored poultry sausages on the market. They're well-seasoned and contain less fat than the traditional beef and pork sausages. If you have any red cabbage left over, just cover it and refrigerate--it will taste even better the second day.
FOOD
January 9, 2002 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two women were discussing mushrooms in the produce department at a Chinese market. "Add a little soy sauce and some onion," said one. "Put in ginger root, of course, and be sure to include a dash of sugar." I couldn't wait to try it myself. We learn new dishes in any number of ways--from cookbooks, friends, publications, TV shows and restaurants. And sometimes even by eavesdropping. I came across an idea for spinach seasoned with lots of garlic in a Cantonese restaurant in Chinatown.
FOOD
December 6, 2000 | DONNA DEANE
Light cooking is often fast cooking, but not always. This dish, though it takes only a little time to put together, needs a good two hours on the stove to taste its best. I like to serve it with duck and turkey sausage or one of the other flavored poultry sausages on the market. They're well-seasoned and contain less fat than the traditional beef and pork sausages. If you have any red cabbage left over, just cover it and refrigerate--it will taste even better the second day.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|