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Red Car Trolley

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MAGAZINE
June 2, 2002 | EMMETT BERG
Can't stand the music in the car next to yours? Picture this: the teenage Buddy Collette and Charles Mingus jamming together while riding downtown from Watts during the '30s on L.A.'s bygone Red Car trolley line. Along with serving as a rhythm section for budding jazz legends, the Red Car's woody squeaks, bells and clacking steel embodied on-the-move Los Angeles for decades--and now there are signs of a Red Car revival.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
The $930-million light rail Expo Line will finally reach into Culver City on Wednesday, marking the first time rail service will serve the traffic-choked Westside since the last days of the Red Car trolleys in the mid-1900s. Transportation officials will open the Culver City station - near Washington and National boulevards - beginning about noon after a celebration with elected leaders. Officials opened most of the first phase of the line in late April, allowing commuters to travel 7.9 miles between downtown Los Angeles and the eastern edge of Culver City in about half an hour.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1997
After a more than 50-year absence, the Red Car trolley will return to Covina on Monday. A replica of the legendary Red Car will provide free evening trips between Covina Park and the city's historic downtown until mid-August, city officials said. The return of the Red Car that ran when much of Covina was citrus groves is part of the city's effort to promote summer recreation programs in the park, said Kenneth Herron, city marketing manager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2004 | Daniel Hernandez, Times Staff Writer
In its heyday 60 years ago, the Belmont Tunnel was a prime passageway into Los Angeles, an early experiment in using a subway to move people across the city. Thousands of Red Car trolley passengers traversed it daily in their journey between downtown and Hollywood. Today, the darkened tunnel set into a hill just west of downtown's gleaming skyscrapers is an outpost of urban decay. The ground is littered with garbage and spray-paint cans.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | FRANKI V. RANSOM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Naomi Weidel, 87, was among the witnesses to the city's foray into the world of public transit. "Oh look, that's the new red trolley!" she cried Thursday as the vehicle rolled past the Covina Beauty College on College Avenue. Although Weidel wasn't sure she would use the service, Tiffany Whiteleather, an 18-year-old student at the school, said she probably will. "I would use it because it's not expensive, especially with the price of gas these days," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
The $930-million light rail Expo Line will finally reach into Culver City on Wednesday, marking the first time rail service will serve the traffic-choked Westside since the last days of the Red Car trolleys in the mid-1900s. Transportation officials will open the Culver City station - near Washington and National boulevards - beginning about noon after a celebration with elected leaders. Officials opened most of the first phase of the line in late April, allowing commuters to travel 7.9 miles between downtown Los Angeles and the eastern edge of Culver City in about half an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2004 | Daniel Hernandez, Times Staff Writer
In its heyday 60 years ago, the Belmont Tunnel was a prime passageway into Los Angeles, an early experiment in using a subway to move people across the city. Thousands of Red Car trolley passengers traversed it daily in their journey between downtown and Hollywood. Today, the darkened tunnel set into a hill just west of downtown's gleaming skyscrapers is an outpost of urban decay. The ground is littered with garbage and spray-paint cans.
NEWS
April 18, 1991
The city has increased the funding to oversee the renovation of the Ivy Substation, an abandoned Red Car trolley stop that is on the National Register of Historic Places. The city's redevelopment agency this week hired an architectural consultant and a construction management firm to oversee the project. "Because this building is on the National Register, there will be oversight," said the agency's assistant executive director, Jody Hall-Esser. The funds were increased to $293,683 from $125,000.
REAL ESTATE
May 14, 1989
A $40-million, 400,000-square-foot business park will be developed on a 20-acre Torrance parcel formerly used as a maintenance center for the Red Car trolley line. The developer, Shimizu Land Corp., an American affiliate of one of Japan's "Big 6" general contractors, has paid about $14 million for the land east of the intersection of 208th Street and Crenshaw Boulevard. The business park will be Shimizu Land's first solo venture in the Southland. The Seeley Co.'s Torrance office represented Shimizu in the transaction; the seller, Reynolds Metals Development Co., Richmond, Va., negotiated in its own behalf.
MAGAZINE
June 2, 2002 | EMMETT BERG
Can't stand the music in the car next to yours? Picture this: the teenage Buddy Collette and Charles Mingus jamming together while riding downtown from Watts during the '30s on L.A.'s bygone Red Car trolley line. Along with serving as a rhythm section for budding jazz legends, the Red Car's woody squeaks, bells and clacking steel embodied on-the-move Los Angeles for decades--and now there are signs of a Red Car revival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1997
After a more than 50-year absence, the Red Car trolley will return to Covina on Monday. A replica of the legendary Red Car will provide free evening trips between Covina Park and the city's historic downtown until mid-August, city officials said. The return of the Red Car that ran when much of Covina was citrus groves is part of the city's effort to promote summer recreation programs in the park, said Kenneth Herron, city marketing manager.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | FRANKI V. RANSOM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Naomi Weidel, 87, was among the witnesses to the city's foray into the world of public transit. "Oh look, that's the new red trolley!" she cried Thursday as the vehicle rolled past the Covina Beauty College on College Avenue. Although Weidel wasn't sure she would use the service, Tiffany Whiteleather, an 18-year-old student at the school, said she probably will. "I would use it because it's not expensive, especially with the price of gas these days," she said.
NEWS
June 20, 1985
A $25.8-million agreement for the purchase of 16 miles of right of way for the Long Beach-Los Angeles light rail line was celebrated as "a major milestone" in returning regional rail transit to the Southern California. Denman K. McNear, chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Southern Pacific Transportation Co., and Jacki Bacharach, chairwoman of the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission, signed the agreement during a ceremony in Los Angeles' Roosevelt Park.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1996 | BARBARA MURPHY
Bear Advertising of Westlake Village has acquired Leunis Inc., a Calabasas advertising agency. The acquisition will allow Bear Advertising, which has focused on the outdoor sports market, to expand its account base to include travel and tourism clientele, officials said.
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