Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRed Cliff
IN THE NEWS

Red Cliff

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2009
'Red Cliff' MPAA rating: R for sequences of epic warfare Running time: 2 hours, 28 minutes Playing: In general release
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Director-producer John Woo will head up the jury at the fourth annual Beijing International Film Festival , which kicks off April 16, organizers said. Woo, 67, is the Hong Kong helmer of films including "Mission: Impossible II," "A Better Tomorrow," "Red Cliff" and "Face/Off. " The weeklong festival will hold screenings at some 30 theaters throughout China's capital. The international jury will hand out the Tiantan Awards in 10 categories, including best feature, director, actor, actress, cinematography and screenplay.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Noel Murray
The Blind Side Warner, $28.98; Blu-ray, $35.99 Sandra Bullock's Oscar-winning lead performance is the best part of "The Blind Side," a maudlin, feel-good melodrama that takes the real-life story of NFL lineman Michael Oher's tough upbringing and turns it into the story of a saintly Southern woman who plays patron. The movie is effective as a tear-jerker, but as charismatic as Bullock can be, her character doesn't make sense unless the kid she's taking care of is just as fleshed out, and Oher, as played by Quinton Aaron, remains a blank throughout "The Blind Side."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Jonathan Landreth, Special to the Los Angeles Times
SHANGHAI - The opening-night screening at a major film festival is usually a hot ticket. Not so in China - at least not for the VIPs visiting from around the world, most of whom fled after the government officials' speeches and lifetime achievement awards at the start of the 15th Shanghai International Film Festival on June 16. They ducked out before director Wuershan's action fantasy "Painted Skin II: The Resurrection" got a chance to...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
When the Chow Yun-fat action-comedy epic "Let the Bullets Fly" opened in China last year, it quickly became a phenomenon. Lured by its splashy fight scenes and whip-snap dialogue, filmgoers swarmed theaters. The movie wound up taking in more than $100 million at the box office in China, the most for a homegrown film. Yet despite its Hollywood-style violence and an actor with international name recognition, "Let the Bullets Fly" hasn't even managed to find a distributor in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Director-producer John Woo will head up the jury at the fourth annual Beijing International Film Festival , which kicks off April 16, organizers said. Woo, 67, is the Hong Kong helmer of films including "Mission: Impossible II," "A Better Tomorrow," "Red Cliff" and "Face/Off. " The weeklong festival will hold screenings at some 30 theaters throughout China's capital. The international jury will hand out the Tiantan Awards in 10 categories, including best feature, director, actor, actress, cinematography and screenplay.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | By Jonathan Landreth
SHANGHAI — Hollywood and Chinese film veterans eager to take part in the world's fastest growing movie market gathered in this historic city to kick off the 15th annual Shanghai International Film Festival. China's movie ticket sales rose 30% last year to $1.2 billion, and a lot of those tickets were sold for American movies. Hollywood films accounted for about three-quarters of the ticket sales in China in the first three months of the year. Ticket sales also topped those in Japan for the first time, making China Hollywood's biggest export market.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Jonathan Landreth, Special to the Los Angeles Times
SHANGHAI - The opening-night screening at a major film festival is usually a hot ticket. Not so in China - at least not for the VIPs visiting from around the world, most of whom fled after the government officials' speeches and lifetime achievement awards at the start of the 15th Shanghai International Film Festival on June 16. They ducked out before director Wuershan's action fantasy "Painted Skin II: The Resurrection" got a chance to...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Dennis Lim
"I've always wanted to be a global filmmaker," John Woo said in an interview at his Manhattan hotel last month. This cosmopolitan outlook was evident in the late '80s, when Woo galvanized Hong Kong cinema -- and action filmmaking the world over -- with such films as "A Better Tomorrow" and "The Killer." Feverish gangster movies unencumbered by restraint or irony, they were also cross-cultural genre hybrids, combining the slow-motion violence of Sam Peckinpah, the trench-coat cool of Jean-Pierre Melville and the chivalric codes of martial-arts film and literature, even though Woo's characters brandished guns and not swords.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2008 | Min Lee, Associated Press
HONG KONG -- After 16 years directing Hollywood movies, John Woo is returning to Chinese film with an ambitious two-part historical epic that he hopes will also appeal to Western audiences. "Red Cliff," whose first installment is due out in Asia this month, is based on a famous battle in divided 3rd century China that saw 2,000 ships burned. It draws from a storied period in Chinese history that has spawned comic books and video games. Expectations are high for the movie.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | By Jonathan Landreth
SHANGHAI — Hollywood and Chinese film veterans eager to take part in the world's fastest growing movie market gathered in this historic city to kick off the 15th annual Shanghai International Film Festival. China's movie ticket sales rose 30% last year to $1.2 billion, and a lot of those tickets were sold for American movies. Hollywood films accounted for about three-quarters of the ticket sales in China in the first three months of the year. Ticket sales also topped those in Japan for the first time, making China Hollywood's biggest export market.
TRAVEL
February 26, 2012 | By Amanda Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This is for those who don't mind traveling to Earth's edge to get somewhere extraordinary. Broome is in the Kimberley, a hunk of Western Australia the size of California but whose population is only 41,000 hide-skinned, Akubra-sporting (you know, the iconic hat) individuals. It also has some of the country's whitest sand, warmest waters, reddest cliffs and most outlandish geological formations. And those hide-skinned people are almost bizarrely kind. Without fail, if you pull over to look at a map, take a photo or argue with your navigator, they stop their car to ask, "Youse alroight?"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik and David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
When the Chow Yun-fat action-comedy epic "Let the Bullets Fly" opened in China last year, it quickly became a phenomenon. Lured by its splashy fight scenes and whip-snap dialogue, filmgoers swarmed theaters. The movie wound up taking in more than $100 million at the box office in China, the most for a homegrown film. Yet despite its Hollywood-style violence and an actor with international name recognition, "Let the Bullets Fly" hasn't even managed to find a distributor in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Noel Murray
The Blind Side Warner, $28.98; Blu-ray, $35.99 Sandra Bullock's Oscar-winning lead performance is the best part of "The Blind Side," a maudlin, feel-good melodrama that takes the real-life story of NFL lineman Michael Oher's tough upbringing and turns it into the story of a saintly Southern woman who plays patron. The movie is effective as a tear-jerker, but as charismatic as Bullock can be, her character doesn't make sense unless the kid she's taking care of is just as fleshed out, and Oher, as played by Quinton Aaron, remains a blank throughout "The Blind Side."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2009
'Red Cliff' MPAA rating: R for sequences of epic warfare Running time: 2 hours, 28 minutes Playing: In general release
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Dennis Lim
"I've always wanted to be a global filmmaker," John Woo said in an interview at his Manhattan hotel last month. This cosmopolitan outlook was evident in the late '80s, when Woo galvanized Hong Kong cinema -- and action filmmaking the world over -- with such films as "A Better Tomorrow" and "The Killer." Feverish gangster movies unencumbered by restraint or irony, they were also cross-cultural genre hybrids, combining the slow-motion violence of Sam Peckinpah, the trench-coat cool of Jean-Pierre Melville and the chivalric codes of martial-arts film and literature, even though Woo's characters brandished guns and not swords.
TRAVEL
January 31, 1999 | SHARON BOORSTIN, Boorstin is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer
I love the anticipation I feel when I arrive after dark somewhere I've never been before, and can only imagine what my surroundings will look like in the morning. After a late night arrival at the new Doubletree Resort in Sedona, however, I awoke to disappointment: Out the window of our Southwestern-themed suite, instead of seeing Sedona's famous red rocks, mentioned in the ad that had lured us here with its $149 introductory rate, I saw only a parking lot.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2008 | Min Lee, Associated Press
HONG KONG -- After 16 years directing Hollywood movies, John Woo is returning to Chinese film with an ambitious two-part historical epic that he hopes will also appeal to Western audiences. "Red Cliff," whose first installment is due out in Asia this month, is based on a famous battle in divided 3rd century China that saw 2,000 ships burned. It draws from a storied period in Chinese history that has spawned comic books and video games. Expectations are high for the movie.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|