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Red Grange

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NEWS
January 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
Red Grange, football's "Galloping Ghost" who starred as a running back at Illinois and later in professional football, died early today at a Lake Wales hospital. He was 87. Grange died of complications from pneumonia about 3 a.m., said his wife of 49 years, Margaret Grange. He had been in the hospital since July. Grange, one of the storied players of the game and one of 17 charter members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, made his jersey number, 77, famous during the years 1923-25 at Illinois.
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SPORTS
June 3, 2006
Regarding "Prime Numbers" on June 1, here's how Red Grange explained how he became the legendary No. 77: "The guy before me got 76, the guy behind 78." STEVEN VANDERPOOL Los Angeles
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SPORTS
June 3, 2006
Regarding "Prime Numbers" on June 1, here's how Red Grange explained how he became the legendary No. 77: "The guy before me got 76, the guy behind 78." STEVEN VANDERPOOL Los Angeles
SPORTS
July 9, 1999 | LARRY STEWART
What: "SportsCenter of the Decade, 1970s" When: Tonight, 4:30-6:30 ESPN is to be congratulated for its massive SportsCentury project. It has been sports television at its best. But, while much of this two-hour special that reviews the '70s is also well done, there is a problem. To give the show a '70s flavor, SportsCenter anchors Stuart Scott and Rich Eisen don wigs and leisure suits. They look ridiculous, which would be OK if the show was all fun and games.
SPORTS
June 17, 1989
It's ironic how so few words can sum up such a great career. Babe Ruth. Lou Gehrig. Red Grange. Jack Dempsey. Muhammad Ali. Jesse Owens. Jim Thorpe. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. JEFFREY REINER Los Angeles
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | ROGER SIMON
Red Grange just would not say the words. "Naw, naw," he kept telling me. "Aww, naw." C'mon Red, say it. We all know it's true. So just say it. "Nope, not me," he said. "Uh-uh." So I said it for him: Red Grange made pro football. If it weren't for what he did more than six decades ago, we would have no choice but to spend our Sundays watching men in pastel sweaters holding thin sticks and hitting dimpled white balls into little holes.
SPORTS
August 8, 1987
About the all-time sports stars list, those of us who saw Joe Louis at work can only smile at the notion that Muhammad Ali could have danced his way around Joe's two-fisted lightning for more than four or five rounds. If you are serious about the expression all-time it is preposterous to omit Ty Cobb and Christy Mathewson. And what about Red Grange? Has anyone dominated college football like the Galloping Ghost? And Kareem Abdul-Jabbar must take third place to Wilt Chamberlain and the much better rounded Bill Russell.
SPORTS
February 2, 1991
Your obituary of Red Grange was especially interesting because of the details of how Grange tore up Franklin Field and the Penn eleven in 1925. I was a Penn freshman in 1931 and of course had not seen the 1925 game, but some of the faculty members who had seen the massacre, particularly those who wanted Penn to downgrade football, mentioned it in classes from time to time, as part of our education. A telling point by the profs was the recital of some of the Sunday sports page headlines, particularly one that proclaimed, GRANGE 24, PENN 2. In any event, the Galloping Ghost and Illinois, aided later by Pitt and Notre Dame, helped Penn to concentrate on Ivy League athletics.
SPORTS
June 6, 1989
Mickey Mantle was only kidding when he told Yogi Berra that catching was overrated, but Yogi took him seriously, and therein lies a tale. "It was before a series with Detroit," Mantle told Phil Mushnick of the New York Post. "I was telling Yogi I could call pitches better than he could. I was just pulling his leg, but he got mad and we wound up in an argument. "So when it was Whitey Ford's turn to pitch, the three of us made a deal. I'd call the pitches from the outfield. If I bent over, it was a curve; if I stood up, fastball; and so on. Yogi'd throw back to Whitey, then Whitey would turn around to rub up the ball, and I'd give him the signal.
SPORTS
April 20, 1991
A reader wrote severely admonishing Mike Downey (April 13). The message was, in sum and paraphrase, "He writes well, but who needs his social commentary?" It is true that Downey now and then takes note of some of the sociological aspects of sports in America. And thank heaven he does. The general approach seems to be (other than Jim Murray's continuing love affair with the German Army of World War II) that sports are in some manner separate from the historical milieu in which they have so eminently prospered.
SPORTS
November 21, 1996 | JIM MURRAY
Heisman Trophy time again. The ballot is in the mail. Honest. I won't tell you how I voted. Not kosher. But I will say I'm not at all sure it will be for the right one. Somehow, it never is. You see, the Heisman, while not exactly a jinx, is not altogether a promise of great things to come. A little entity called the NFL has come along to complicate the coronations.
SPORTS
April 20, 1991
A reader wrote severely admonishing Mike Downey (April 13). The message was, in sum and paraphrase, "He writes well, but who needs his social commentary?" It is true that Downey now and then takes note of some of the sociological aspects of sports in America. And thank heaven he does. The general approach seems to be (other than Jim Murray's continuing love affair with the German Army of World War II) that sports are in some manner separate from the historical milieu in which they have so eminently prospered.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | ROGER SIMON
Red Grange just would not say the words. "Naw, naw," he kept telling me. "Aww, naw." C'mon Red, say it. We all know it's true. So just say it. "Nope, not me," he said. "Uh-uh." So I said it for him: Red Grange made pro football. If it weren't for what he did more than six decades ago, we would have no choice but to spend our Sundays watching men in pastel sweaters holding thin sticks and hitting dimpled white balls into little holes.
SPORTS
February 2, 1991
Your obituary of Red Grange was especially interesting because of the details of how Grange tore up Franklin Field and the Penn eleven in 1925. I was a Penn freshman in 1931 and of course had not seen the 1925 game, but some of the faculty members who had seen the massacre, particularly those who wanted Penn to downgrade football, mentioned it in classes from time to time, as part of our education. A telling point by the profs was the recital of some of the Sunday sports page headlines, particularly one that proclaimed, GRANGE 24, PENN 2. In any event, the Galloping Ghost and Illinois, aided later by Pitt and Notre Dame, helped Penn to concentrate on Ivy League athletics.
SPORTS
January 29, 1991 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 1920s, good pro football players made maybe $250 per game, washed their own uniforms, often slept in their cars and sometimes performed their own dental work. NFL franchises were in places such as Pottstown, Beloit, Canton, Racine, Rock Island and Decatur. More than any other man, Red Grange changed all that. Sports historians consider him the player who took the NFL out of high school stadiums and put it into major stadiums.
SPORTS
January 29, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Harold (Red) Grange died early Monday at 87, the last living reminder of that fabulous company of athletes who made the decade from 1920 to 1930 the Golden Age of American Sports. Grange died of complications from pneumonia in a hospital at his home near Lake Wales, Fla., said Margaret Grange, his wife of 49 years. His condition was diagnosed as Parkinson's disease last year. He had been hospitalized since July, and on the critical list for a week.
SPORTS
February 7, 1988
Has anybody in football history ever had a quarter like Doug Williams in the Super Bowl? Red Grange, maybe. When Illinois faced Michigan in 1924, Grange scored four times in the first quarter on runs of 95, 67, 56 and 45 yards. He was taken out after 12 minutes, not returning until the third quarter when he scored again on a 13-yard run. He threw for a sixth touchdown in the fourth quarter. Illinois won, 39-14. In 41 minutes of play, Grange ran for 402 yards and passed for 64.
SPORTS
January 9, 1988
Care to join the fastest growing club in America? There are no dues. No papers to fill out. You don't have to go to meetings. Most of your friends and neighbors belong. It's the BJBPA . . . the Bo Jackson Benevolent and Protective Assn. Has much been written on this subject? Only enough to fill a shelf or two in your local library. Anyone who knows the difference between an infield fly and a shanked punt has given Bo's future a great deal of thought and has expressed one or more opinions on the subject.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
Red Grange, football's "Galloping Ghost" who starred as a running back at Illinois and later in professional football, died early today at a Lake Wales hospital. He was 87. Grange died of complications from pneumonia about 3 a.m., said his wife of 49 years, Margaret Grange. He had been in the hospital since July. Grange, one of the storied players of the game and one of 17 charter members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, made his jersey number, 77, famous during the years 1923-25 at Illinois.
SPORTS
July 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Harold (Red) Grange, football's legendary Galloping Ghost, has been found to have Parkinson's disease but should be home from an extended-care facility in a few weeks, his wife said. "He won't be going dancing," said Muggs Grange, his wife of more than 49 years, "but he's going to outlive all of us." The 87-year-old Grange, one of the 17 charter members in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, went in for a checkup last month at Lake Wales Hospital and was hospitalized briefly, Mrs. Grange said.
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