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OPINION
June 12, 1988 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, West Coast editor of Inc. magazine, is co-author of "The Third Century: America's Resurgence in the Asian Era" (Crown), due in September. He recently returned from China.
Over the last 70 years of Chinese history, the district near the campus of Beijing University has been a center for revolutionary ferment. In the early 20th Century, the campus area served as a favorite meeting place for nationalist and communist revolutionaries, and in the 1960s it was a launching pad for the Cultural Revolution. Today the tree-lined streets are again abuzz with talk of radical change.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - Plug "Ping Fu" and "liar" into Google these days and the combo yields more than 6,300 hits. (See, also, "big fat liar," "lie-fabricating machine," etc.) But it wasn't always that way. A child of China's Cultural Revolution, Fu arrived in the U.S. three decades ago and went on to build a successful 3D-modeling technology company and earn a seat on the Obama administration's National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Then she did something that shifted her reputation, quite possibly forever: She wrote a memoir.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2004 | From Associated Press
Ma Chengyuan, the former president of Shanghai's renowned art museum who saved priceless artifacts from marauding Red Guards during the Cultural Revolution, has died at age 77, the official Xinhua News Agency said Sunday. An authority on ancient Chinese bronzes, Ma died Sept. 25, with funeral services held Saturday, Xinhua said. No cause of death was given.
WORLD
May 4, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
MASHANG VILLAGE, China - The last time they saw their father, Hong Yunke, he was leaving home, hauling his wooden medicine chest, on a frigid December morning in 1967. "I'm going to treat a patient and collect money," Hong told his son, 12, and his daughter, 9. "I'll be back soon. " Hong was what the Chinese call a barefoot doctor, a self-educated healer who treated the sprained ankles of farmers for 20 cents, enough in those days for two pork buns. His wife, unable to endure the poverty, had left him to raise the children on his own. No matter.
NEWS
October 11, 2009 | Associated Press
Sun Fengqing is not getting married in a white dress, or even a traditional cheongsam. She's going to wear a green military outfit with a Red Star on her hat and a Mao Tse-tung badge -- the uniform of the young Red Guard from China's Cultural Revolution. The choice of outfit shows how, 60 years after the founding of the People's Republic of China, revolutionary images have taken on different meaning for the nation's young generation. "It's just different from other wedding pictures," said Sun, a 24-year-old advertisement company worker, who is marrying 26-year-old dancer Xu Shuo.
WORLD
May 4, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
MASHANG VILLAGE, China - The last time they saw their father, Hong Yunke, he was leaving home, hauling his wooden medicine chest, on a frigid December morning in 1967. "I'm going to treat a patient and collect money," Hong told his son, 12, and his daughter, 9. "I'll be back soon. " Hong was what the Chinese call a barefoot doctor, a self-educated healer who treated the sprained ankles of farmers for 20 cents, enough in those days for two pork buns. His wife, unable to endure the poverty, had left him to raise the children on his own. No matter.
OPINION
October 1, 2010 | By Daniel K. Gardner
Confucius, the venerable sage who lived in the 6th century BC, is enjoying a 21st century revival. His rehabilitators? The Chinese Communist Party. Yes, that party, the one celebrating the 61st anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on Oct. 1. The same party whose chairman, Mao Tse-tung, vilified Confucius' "stinking corpse" during the Cultural Revolution and ordered the Red Guards to destroy all temples, statues, historical landmarks and texts associated with the sage.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2008
As an old China hand and a writer, I enjoyed reading "The World of Mao" [April 13], an excellent piece of journalism, far beyond the usual run of travel articles on China. James Morgan Ayres Valley Village Even in a travel article, one should not be writing about Mao Tse-tung without emphasizing the disaster that was the Cultural Revolution. The generation that just reached school age at the start of the revolution lost 10 of the most precious years of their lives because of the unrelenting unrest caused by the youthful Red Guards, destroying revered symbols of traditional culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - Plug "Ping Fu" and "liar" into Google these days and the combo yields more than 6,300 hits. (See, also, "big fat liar," "lie-fabricating machine," etc.) But it wasn't always that way. A child of China's Cultural Revolution, Fu arrived in the U.S. three decades ago and went on to build a successful 3D-modeling technology company and earn a seat on the Obama administration's National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Then she did something that shifted her reputation, quite possibly forever: She wrote a memoir.
WORLD
March 30, 2013 | By John Hannon, Los Angeles Times
GUZHEN, China - At 58, Zhang Hongbing is still tormented by the death of his mother more than four decades ago. She was a victim of China's Cultural Revolution, executed by firing squad during Chairman Mao Tse-tung's decadelong purge of capitalism, cultural elites and political rivals. As a 15-year-old Red Guard, Zhang denounced her to authorities. Today Zhang is a lawyer, and he is trying to make amends for his past. He has officially cleared his mother's name of the charges for which she was killed, and he has reconciled with relatives.
OPINION
October 1, 2010 | By Daniel K. Gardner
Confucius, the venerable sage who lived in the 6th century BC, is enjoying a 21st century revival. His rehabilitators? The Chinese Communist Party. Yes, that party, the one celebrating the 61st anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on Oct. 1. The same party whose chairman, Mao Tse-tung, vilified Confucius' "stinking corpse" during the Cultural Revolution and ordered the Red Guards to destroy all temples, statues, historical landmarks and texts associated with the sage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2009 | Patricia Sullivan, Sullivan writes for the Washington Post.
Nien Cheng, whose memoir "Life and Death in Shanghai" was widely praised as one of the most riveting accounts of the Cultural Revolution, died Nov. 2 of cardiovascular and renal disease at her home in Washington, D.C. She was 94. At a time when China's Communist leader Mao Tse-tung was trying to purge political rivals and reassert his authority, Cheng, the wealthy widow of an oil company executive, was one of untold numbers of professionals who...
NEWS
October 11, 2009 | Associated Press
Sun Fengqing is not getting married in a white dress, or even a traditional cheongsam. She's going to wear a green military outfit with a Red Star on her hat and a Mao Tse-tung badge -- the uniform of the young Red Guard from China's Cultural Revolution. The choice of outfit shows how, 60 years after the founding of the People's Republic of China, revolutionary images have taken on different meaning for the nation's young generation. "It's just different from other wedding pictures," said Sun, a 24-year-old advertisement company worker, who is marrying 26-year-old dancer Xu Shuo.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2008
As an old China hand and a writer, I enjoyed reading "The World of Mao" [April 13], an excellent piece of journalism, far beyond the usual run of travel articles on China. James Morgan Ayres Valley Village Even in a travel article, one should not be writing about Mao Tse-tung without emphasizing the disaster that was the Cultural Revolution. The generation that just reached school age at the start of the revolution lost 10 of the most precious years of their lives because of the unrelenting unrest caused by the youthful Red Guards, destroying revered symbols of traditional culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2004 | From Associated Press
Ma Chengyuan, the former president of Shanghai's renowned art museum who saved priceless artifacts from marauding Red Guards during the Cultural Revolution, has died at age 77, the official Xinhua News Agency said. An authority on ancient Chinese bronzes, Ma died Sept. 25, with funeral services held Saturday, Xinhua reported Sunday. No cause of death was given.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2000
Re Robert Scheer's July 11 commentary on the Wen Ho Lee case: As a historian I have often taught the McCarthy period in American history, but, not having lived through it myself, I did not really know how it felt until the Wen Ho Lee case burst onto the national scene last year. To be sure, this is not another large-scale Red Scare, but the parallels are disturbing: the same domestic paranoia generated by international politics; the same drive for sensational reporting in the media; the same about-face that turns past legal--and often officially encouraged--activities into suspicions; the same tendency to view scientists, especially nuclear scientists, as security risks and, above all, the same partisan politics that fuel security investigations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2000
Re Robert Scheer's July 11 commentary on the Wen Ho Lee case: As a historian I have often taught the McCarthy period in American history, but, not having lived through it myself, I did not really know how it felt until the Wen Ho Lee case burst onto the national scene last year. To be sure, this is not another large-scale Red Scare, but the parallels are disturbing: the same domestic paranoia generated by international politics; the same drive for sensational reporting in the media; the same about-face that turns past legal--and often officially encouraged--activities into suspicions; the same tendency to view scientists, especially nuclear scientists, as security risks and, above all, the same partisan politics that fuel security investigations.
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