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FOOD
October 14, 1998 | BARBARA HANSEN
Herring salad is not loved by everyone, but over the years the Danish-style herring from Olson's Delicatessen has changed many people's minds about pickled fish salads. Olson's salad is sweet-tasting and very pink, almost red, because beets are added along with apples, macaroni bits, mayonnaise and, of course, pickled herring. Herring salad is a terrific party appetizer served with rye crisp bread from Finland or pumpernickel, both of which are available at Olson's.
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NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Admittedly, I don't get a lot of my news from Fox News. But when I saw this headline Wednesday, “Non-citizens caught voting in 2012 presidential election in key swing state,” well, let's just say they had me at “non-citizens caught voting.” Like Mitt Romney weeks later, and Karl Rove on election night, Fox has its own way of spinning the 2012 election. But hey, if voter fraud cost Romney Ohio, that's big news - bigger than President Obama being born in Kenya, bigger than Obamacare as the worst government disaster ever, bigger than Benghazi, bigger than Obama's uncle whom he did/didn't know, bigger than, well, you get the Fox(y)
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NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Admittedly, I don't get a lot of my news from Fox News. But when I saw this headline Wednesday, “Non-citizens caught voting in 2012 presidential election in key swing state,” well, let's just say they had me at “non-citizens caught voting.” Like Mitt Romney weeks later, and Karl Rove on election night, Fox has its own way of spinning the 2012 election. But hey, if voter fraud cost Romney Ohio, that's big news - bigger than President Obama being born in Kenya, bigger than Obamacare as the worst government disaster ever, bigger than Benghazi, bigger than Obama's uncle whom he did/didn't know, bigger than, well, you get the Fox(y)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
With his decision to address lust for another man on his new album, "Channel Orange," 24-year-old Frank Ocean has become something other than one of the most dynamic R&B singers and songwriters of the last half-decade: He's become, for the moment, one of the first to challenge a genre known for its acidic intolerance of homosexuality. The album was highly anticipated, coming on the heels of Ocean's critically acclaimed collection from last year, "Nostalgia, Ultra," and the sexual content - which surfaces on two songs - has so far received fairly gentle treatment.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | Times Wire Services
The chief U.S. arms negotiator, backed by Senate Democrats and Republicans, today denounced a theory by the top critic of the INF treaty that the pact eliminates missiles but not nuclear warheads. Several of the senators called it a "red herring" and said destroying warheads is not the purpose of the pact. Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) questioning chief arms negotiator Max Kampelman in the second day of Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearings on the treaty, reiterated his concern that the U.S.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1999 | A Times Staff Writer
Every brokerage, Web site and investing neophyte seems to be weighing in these days with stock selections for the next a) year, b) decade, c) century or d) millennium. But because Red Herring magazine specializes in technology coverage, we figured its "10 Tech Stocks for the Next Century," announced Wednesday, might not be too fishy--even if the headline is a stretch.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2008 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
It's 1952, and postwar America is regrouping. "I Love Lucy" rules Monday nights, Rodgers and Hammerstein dominate record players and "I Like Ike" is wending its way toward 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Meanwhile, the Senate hearings have upped the Red Scare, hydrogen is undergoing a Los Alamos overhaul, and communist paranoia has become as commonplace as microfilm hidden in Velveeta. Such loopy elements float "Red Herring" in its top-notch Southern California premiere at the Laguna Playhouse.
OPINION
November 5, 1995 | FRANK del OLMO, Frank del Olmo is assistant to the editor of The Times and a regular columnist
Pity les Quebecois. In the wake of Monday's narrow defeat of the most recent campaign by French-Canadian secessionists to break away from English-speaking Canada, it appears that the bitter family argument north of our border will continue for years to come. But save a little sympathy for nosotros, los Latinos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1994 | MIKHAIL P. LYUBIMOV, Retired KGB colonel Mikhail P. Lyubimov served as an intelligence officer in London, 1961-65, in Moscow, 1964-76, and was KGB resident in Copenhagen from 1976-80. He now writes novels. and
On a spring morning in 1985, Gen. Vladimir A. Kryuchkov, the head of the KGB foreign intelligence directorate and future chief of the spy agency, was roused from his sleep for some sensational information: The head of the Central Intelligence Agency's Soviet and Eastern Europe counterintelligence department, Aldrich H. Ames, had offered his services to the KGB. Ames had already identified the first batch of American agents in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | BERNICE HIRABAYASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Differing philosophies about what the city's attitude toward business should be are emerging as a key issue in the Culver City Council campaign. Five candidates are competing for three seats in the April 14 election. In an effort to unseat two incumbents known for their slow-growth leanings, two challengers are painting the city as hostile to business interests. Richard Alexander, who served on the City Council for four consecutive terms ending in 1990, said he came out of retirement because he couldn't bear to watch city government strangle business with excessive regulation.
OPINION
April 11, 2011
Fans are fed up Re "Ballpark violence," Editorial, April 7 The Times encourages fans not to tolerate rowdiness at Dodger Stadium. As a Dodgers fan who has attended many games, I find that the bad behavior usually stems from individuals who have consumed a few too many beers. At the very least they interfere with my enjoyment of the game. The Times says it is not suggesting that the stadium go dry. I am. There are plenty of soft drinks and water available. I am an 84-year-old man, and I am not about to confront several drunk individuals who are rowdy.
WORLD
November 12, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
A high-ranking intelligence officer betrayed Russia by exposing a secret spy ring operating in the United States until June and defecting, a newspaper reported Thursday. The officer, identified only as Col. Shcherbakov, was instrumental in the high-profile arrests of Russian spies in New York, Boston, Virginia, New Jersey and Cyprus, according to a cover story in the Moscow-based Kommersant daily. Shcherbakov, who the paper said handled the spy ring in the United States, reportedly left Russia shortly before U.S. officials announced the arrests in June.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2010 | By Ralph Vartabedian and Ken Bensinger
Toyota Motor Corp.'s decision to blame its widening sudden-acceleration problem on a gas pedal defect came under attack Friday, with the pedal manufacturer flatly denying that its products were at fault. Federal vehicle safety records reviewed by The Times also cast doubt on Toyota's claims that sticky gas pedals were a significant factor in the growing reports of runaway vehicles. Of more than 2,000 motorist complaints of sudden acceleration in Toyota and Lexus vehicles over the last decade, just 5% blamed a sticking gas pedal, the analysis found.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2009
Re: Michael Hiltzik's business column "Insurers' critics go after red herring," Nov. 2: When I started a general practice as a physician in Azusa in 1955, I visited the local doctors to inform them. When I asked what they charged for an average office visit, they said they could not tell me because of antitrust law. I was located in a poor neighborhood, so I charged $4 a visit. Many patients I did not charge at all. Now I read that huge medical insurance companies are exempt from antitrust law!
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2008 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
It's 1952, and postwar America is regrouping. "I Love Lucy" rules Monday nights, Rodgers and Hammerstein dominate record players and "I Like Ike" is wending its way toward 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Meanwhile, the Senate hearings have upped the Red Scare, hydrogen is undergoing a Los Alamos overhaul, and communist paranoia has become as commonplace as microfilm hidden in Velveeta. Such loopy elements float "Red Herring" in its top-notch Southern California premiere at the Laguna Playhouse.
OPINION
June 18, 2006
Re "Ban on O.C. Tollway Is Removed From Budget," June 13 The news that our state lawmakers removed language that would have protected San Onofre State Beach, one of our most famous state parks, from invasion by a toll road is shocking. This move will set a precedent by allowing other agencies to plan roads through other parks with total disregard to the important role that these places play. The $875 million approved for the project could be put to better use by promoting train travel with connecting bus lines.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Red Herring Communications said it is cutting 32 jobs, or 9.4% of its work force, as it closes an office in Cupertino, Calif., and combines its online and magazine editorial departments. The San Francisco-based publisher of Red Herring said it is hiring an outside company to host and manage its Web site, Redherring.com. . . . MVP.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2001
Commerce One Inc. said it will cut as many as 360 employees, or about 10% of its work force, to reduce costs amid the flagging U.S economy and a slowdown in information technology spending. The company had been one of the few leading business-to-business software companies to weather the economic storm without announcing layoffs. . . .
OPINION
July 28, 2005
Re "U.S. an environmental slacker," Opinion, July 25 Wow. So I'm an environmental slacker! Too bad Sen. Dianne Feinstein is an academic slacker. Does our planet seem to be heating up? Yup. Is it the result of burning fossil fuels? Don't know. Nobody does. Blaming the warming of the planet on fossil fuels ignores the fact that the Earth has been much warmer than it is now, as well as much colder. Global warming is a red herring. It should be called climate change. As to the Kyoto Protocol, only someone as smugly self-righteous as Feinstein would even suggest that it would be a good idea to turn over our economy to some appointed world body to decide just how much fuel we are able to burn, while Third World nations such as China and Brazil can burn as much fuel as they want.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2004 | Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
After Red Herring sank into the dot-com morass last year, Tony Perkins considered resurrecting the magazine that helped establish him as a Silicon Valley sage. He changed his mind when his college-age daughter scoffed and told him "Red Herring is so 1990s." So Perkins' return to the high-tech publishing scene will be narrower and perhaps riskier for that. The new venture, AlwaysOn, will bring one of the Internet's hottest trends -- Web logging, or "blogging" -- to print.
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