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Red Manager Pete Rose

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SPORTS
June 8, 1989
If you watched Dennis Rodman put up an air ball from the free-throw line Tuesday night, you wouldn't believe that Detroit sent him to the line to shoot a technical against San Antonio in a game this season. Chuck Daly, the Pistons' coach, couldn't believe it, either. In fact, he was livid. Asked to explain how Rodman, a 55% free-throw shooter, was sent to the line, Daly said, "He said he asked someone if he could shoot it." Said Rodman: "I asked myself. I just wanted to try it. I'm probably the only guy on the team who hasn't shot one."
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SPORTS
June 27, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Of the many apparent differences between starting pitching and late-inning relief pitching, Tim Belcher will be the first to tell you there is really only one. Starters make a bad pitch and calmly call it a mistake. A late-inning reliever makes a bad pitch and calls it a loss. Then it's all he can do to keep from screaming. "I made a bad pitch to lose a game, that's all I got to say," Belcher barked behind a red face Monday night after allowing a two-run home run to the second batter he faced, previously homer-less Bo Diaz, which gave the Cincinnati Reds a 5-3 victory in front of 23,727 at Riverfront Stadium.
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SPORTS
June 4, 1989 | DAN HAFNER
It was June before the Cincinnati Reds' Eric Davis really started to hit last season. His furious finish enabled the slugger to have another solid season. He started hitting a little earlier this season and cruised into June on a hitting spree. Davis hit a three-run home run to break a 1-1 tie in the sixth inning of the Reds' 6-2 victory over the San Diego Padres on a rainy Saturday night in Cincinnati. Davis became the first Red in 30 years to hit for the cycle Friday night when he also hit a three-run home run. In the last five games, he is 11 for 18 with three doubles in addition to his two homers and has driven in 10 runs.
SPORTS
June 25, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
It may have been the 89-degree heat, it may have been the smothering humidity, or, knowing those Dodgers, it may have just been the national television. Whatever, there were several unusual sightings Saturday as the Dodgers beat the Cincinnati Reds, 10-3, a score that would probably qualify as the most unusual sighting of all. Consider: --When is the last time you have seen 17 Dodger hits, including an infield double by Alfredo Griffin and a pinch home run by Franklin Stubbs?
SPORTS
May 28, 1989 | DAN HAFNER
There have been many lean seasons for Chicago baseball and basketball fans. The Cubs, the White Sox and the Bulls have struggled through years of mediocrity. But now Chicago sports fans are being overwhelmed. The Cubs and Bulls, at least, are providing them with all the excitement they could want. The cheers often seemed out of sync Saturday at Wrigley Field as 34,546 fans watched the East-leading Cubs beat the Cincinnati Reds, 5-3. For instance, when Eric Davis hit a two-run home run in the ninth inning to narrow the lead to two runs, there was a tremendous roar from the fans.
SPORTS
June 24, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
His team lost to the Cincinnati Reds, 3-1, Friday night, and normally that's all Dodger Manager Tom Lasorda would have seen. That's all he would have felt, or been able to talk about. But in this town, where a hero's reputation is coming apart in a manner as slow and uncomfortable as the Midwestern midsummer days, these are not normal times. After the Dodgers wasted 10 hits and another fine start by Mike Morgan, Lasorda chose to talk about something he saw an hour before the game.
SPORTS
June 27, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Of the many apparent differences between starting pitching and late-inning relief pitching, Tim Belcher will be the first to tell you there is really only one. Starters make a bad pitch and calmly call it a mistake. A late-inning reliever makes a bad pitch and calls it a loss. Then it's all he can do to keep from screaming. "I made a bad pitch to lose a game, that's all I got to say," Belcher barked behind a red face Monday night after allowing a two-run home run to the second batter he faced, previously homer-less Bo Diaz, which gave the Cincinnati Reds a 5-3 victory in front of 23,727 at Riverfront Stadium.
SPORTS
June 25, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
It may have been the 89-degree heat, it may have been the smothering humidity, or, knowing those Dodgers, it may have just been the national television. Whatever, there were several unusual sightings Saturday as the Dodgers beat the Cincinnati Reds, 10-3, a score that would probably qualify as the most unusual sighting of all. Consider: --When is the last time you have seen 17 Dodger hits, including an infield double by Alfredo Griffin and a pinch home run by Franklin Stubbs?
SPORTS
June 24, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
His team lost to the Cincinnati Reds, 3-1, Friday night, and normally that's all Dodger Manager Tom Lasorda would have seen. That's all he would have felt, or been able to talk about. But in this town, where a hero's reputation is coming apart in a manner as slow and uncomfortable as the Midwestern midsummer days, these are not normal times. After the Dodgers wasted 10 hits and another fine start by Mike Morgan, Lasorda chose to talk about something he saw an hour before the game.
SPORTS
June 8, 1989
If you watched Dennis Rodman put up an air ball from the free-throw line Tuesday night, you wouldn't believe that Detroit sent him to the line to shoot a technical against San Antonio in a game this season. Chuck Daly, the Pistons' coach, couldn't believe it, either. In fact, he was livid. Asked to explain how Rodman, a 55% free-throw shooter, was sent to the line, Daly said, "He said he asked someone if he could shoot it." Said Rodman: "I asked myself. I just wanted to try it. I'm probably the only guy on the team who hasn't shot one."
SPORTS
June 4, 1989 | DAN HAFNER
It was June before the Cincinnati Reds' Eric Davis really started to hit last season. His furious finish enabled the slugger to have another solid season. He started hitting a little earlier this season and cruised into June on a hitting spree. Davis hit a three-run home run to break a 1-1 tie in the sixth inning of the Reds' 6-2 victory over the San Diego Padres on a rainy Saturday night in Cincinnati. Davis became the first Red in 30 years to hit for the cycle Friday night when he also hit a three-run home run. In the last five games, he is 11 for 18 with three doubles in addition to his two homers and has driven in 10 runs.
SPORTS
May 28, 1989 | DAN HAFNER
There have been many lean seasons for Chicago baseball and basketball fans. The Cubs, the White Sox and the Bulls have struggled through years of mediocrity. But now Chicago sports fans are being overwhelmed. The Cubs and Bulls, at least, are providing them with all the excitement they could want. The cheers often seemed out of sync Saturday at Wrigley Field as 34,546 fans watched the East-leading Cubs beat the Cincinnati Reds, 5-3. For instance, when Eric Davis hit a two-run home run in the ninth inning to narrow the lead to two runs, there was a tremendous roar from the fans.
SPORTS
August 16, 1989 | Associated Press
A postgame argument between first base umpire Joe West and Cincinnati Red second baseman Ron Oester Tuesday night escalated into a shoving match involving Red Manager Pete Rose, Oester and West. The argument started with a call on a 2-and-2 pitch to Mark Grace in the top of the 12th, which plate umpire Bill Hohn called a ball. In the bottom of the 12th, Oester took a 3-and-2 pitch and was called out by Hohn to end the game. Shouting followed between Oester and Hohn and again, West joined in.
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