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NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
On Monday, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health released study results showing that red meat consumption was associated with a higher risk of early death. The more red meat -- beef, pork or lamb, for the purposes of the research -- study participants reported they ate, the more likely they were to die during the period of time that data collection took place (more than 20 years). So what is it in red meat that might make it unhealthy?   No one is sure, exactly, but the authors of the Harvard study mention a few possible culprits in their paper in the Archives of Internal Medicine .   First, eating red meat has been linked to the incidence of heart disease.  The saturated fat and cholesterol in beef, pork and lamb are believed to play a role in the risk of coronary heart disease .  The type of iron found in red meat, known as heme iron, has also been linked to heart attacks and fatal heart disease.  Sodium in processed meats may increase blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Other chemicals that are used in processed meats may play a role in heart disease as well, by damaging blood vessels.
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SCIENCE
January 6, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Even without weight loss, adhering to a diet rich in fresh produce, chicken, fish and olive oil is 40% more effective in heading off the development of Type 2 diabetes than following a low-fat diet, a new study has found. The research suggests that for the nation's 78 million obese adults, a diet that minimizes red meat and sweets but incorporates plant-based fats may be a sustainable way to improve health - even if permanent weight reduction proves elusive. The findings add to mounting research that suggests a traditional Mediterranean diet may be easier to adhere to and more likely to improve health than more restrictive regimens.
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SCIENCE
October 8, 2012 | By Monte Morin
For any gourmand who has ever wondered why certain wines pair so well with a hearty steak, or how a palate-cleansing sorbet works its magic between courses, science has an answer now. Oral astringents -- substances that elicit a "rough" or "dry" taste, such as high-tannin wines -- occupy the exact opposite end of a taste spectrum relative to substances with fatty, or "slippery" qualities, such as steak, according to a study published Monday in...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
I've been a vegetarian for most of my life, which means that over the years I've been subjected to plenty of unsolicited opinions about my health and my decision to stop eating meat. There were epic battles with my grandmother, who grew up on a hog farm in Minnesota and believes eating animals is part of human nature. "It has to do with teeth," is her cryptic explanation. My other grandmother, a New Yorker with a New Age streak, insists that I need beef, chicken and fish even more than most people because of my blood type.
HEALTH
March 24, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Walter Willett is the chair of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. He's also a cow's best friend. Earlier this month, Willett and colleagues, who have studied the link between diet and health for decades, published a study that followed more than 100,000 people over more than 20 years - and found that the amount of red meat they ate was linked to a rise in risk of premature death. The notion that red meat might not be so great for you isn't exactly new, but carnivores cried foul.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
The American Meat Institute has weighed in on a study published this week about eating red meat, and it objects to the study's methods and conclusions. Researchers using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer of 449,000 people said that 3.3% of premature deaths could be prevented if the consumption of processed red meat -- sausages and bacon, for instance -- was below 20 grams per day. But Betsy Booren, chief scientist at the American Meat Institute Foundation, issued a statement saying the study is “trying to identify a cause and effect relationship using a research approach that won't permit such conclusions to be made.” She criticized as unreliable data that come from participants trying to remember what they ate in the past.
SCIENCE
June 17, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Nutritionists known for issuing warnings about the health risks of eating red meat reiterated their message this week, confirming a link between red meat consumption and Type 2 diabetes -- and showing, in a new follow-up study, that the association persists over time. The team, which included Harvard School of Public Health epidemiologist Dr. Walter Willett , reported that people who said they increased their intake of red meat -- beef, pork or lamb -- over a four-year period had a higher chance of developing Type 2 diabetes in the subsequent four-year period than people who said the amount of red meat they ate stayed stable or went down.
FOOD
February 22, 1996 | BEV BENNETT
Since pork producers are successfully marketing their product as "the other white meat," duck producers might do well to launch a campaign for "the other red meat." The resemblance to flank steak, for example, isn't obvious when duck is served whole. But sliced duck breast, fanned out on a plate, is very appealingly meaty-looking. When duck is well browned outside and rare at the center, it is every bit as succulent as a beef steak. Better supermarkets carry or will order duck breast.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
On Monday, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health released a study that linked red meat consumption with increased risk of early death. Probably not surprisingly, the report , which was published in the Archives of Internal Medicine along with the editorial “ Holy Cow! What's Good For You Is Good For Our Planet ” from Dr. Dean Ornish (the man who helped convince Bill Clinton to go vegan ), attracted a lot of interest.  The American Meat Institute was among the first to dispute the findings.  In a statement issued Monday, the industry group criticized the Harvard study for “relying on notoriously unreliable self-reporting about what was eaten and obtuse methods to apply statistical analysis to the data.” During an interview last week with The Times, Kaiser Permanente cancer researcher Lawrence H. Kushi - who was not involved with the Harvard study but said the work produced “important results" - acknowledged that epidemiological studies of survey data aren't as rigorous as a blinded, randomized trial.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The long-established link between red meat consumption and heart disease may have less to do with the fat in the meat than many have assumed, researchers said Sunday.  Writing in the journal Nature Medicine , a team led by Dr. Stanley Hazen of the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland pointed instead to the nutrient L- carnitine -- a substance involved in the digestion of fat and also a popular dietary supplement -- as a key artery-hardening culprit. ...
SCIENCE
June 17, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Nutritionists known for issuing warnings about the health risks of eating red meat reiterated their message this week, confirming a link between red meat consumption and Type 2 diabetes -- and showing, in a new follow-up study, that the association persists over time. The team, which included Harvard School of Public Health epidemiologist Dr. Walter Willett , reported that people who said they increased their intake of red meat -- beef, pork or lamb -- over a four-year period had a higher chance of developing Type 2 diabetes in the subsequent four-year period than people who said the amount of red meat they ate stayed stable or went down.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
The long-established link between red meat consumption and heart disease may have less to do with the fat in the meat than many have assumed, researchers said Sunday.  Writing in the journal Nature Medicine , a team led by Dr. Stanley Hazen of the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland pointed instead to the nutrient L- carnitine -- a substance involved in the digestion of fat and also a popular dietary supplement -- as a key artery-hardening culprit. ...
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
The American Meat Institute has weighed in on a study published this week about eating red meat, and it objects to the study's methods and conclusions. Researchers using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer of 449,000 people said that 3.3% of premature deaths could be prevented if the consumption of processed red meat -- sausages and bacon, for instance -- was below 20 grams per day. But Betsy Booren, chief scientist at the American Meat Institute Foundation, issued a statement saying the study is “trying to identify a cause and effect relationship using a research approach that won't permit such conclusions to be made.” She criticized as unreliable data that come from participants trying to remember what they ate in the past.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Another study has found an association between eating meat and premature death, this time linking the consumption of bacon, sausage and other processed meats with cardiovascular disease and cancer in a study of nearly a half-million Europeans. "Overall, we estimate that 3% of premature deaths each year could be prevented if people ate less than 20 grams processed meat per day," Sabine Rohrmann of the University of Zurich, who led the study, said in a statement. (Twenty grams is about 0.7 ounces; a hot dog comes in at  50 to 70 grams or more, depending on the brand, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture website.)
NEWS
December 18, 2012 | By Eryn Brown
The risks of bad behaviors are well known but not necessarily well understood. Most people are aware that binging on red meat, cigarettes and whiskey on a regular basis isn't good for us -- but how to make sense of the severity of the risk?  When a study reports that adults who ate an extra portion of red meat had a 13% greater chance of dying over the course of a study that spanned more than 20 years, what does that really mean? And what is a sensible person to do about it? Writing in the journal BMJ (subscription required)
SCIENCE
October 8, 2012 | By Monte Morin
For any gourmand who has ever wondered why certain wines pair so well with a hearty steak, or how a palate-cleansing sorbet works its magic between courses, science has an answer now. Oral astringents -- substances that elicit a "rough" or "dry" taste, such as high-tannin wines -- occupy the exact opposite end of a taste spectrum relative to substances with fatty, or "slippery" qualities, such as steak, according to a study published Monday in...
OPINION
January 15, 2012 | Doyle McManus
Mitt Romney isn't a naturally eloquent man. His stump speeches are nearly content-free. They combine exaggerated denunciations of President Obama ("a pessimistic president," "the great complainer") and ardent professions of patriotism. "I love our country," Romney announces at every stop. "I love our national anthem.... I love it dearly. I love putting my hand over my heart. " He often closes speeches by reciting lines from "America the Beautiful. " When he claimed victory in Iowa on Jan. 3, his syntax crumbled into Sarah Palin-like fragments.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2009 | Washington Post
Eating red meat increases the chances of dying prematurely, according to a large federal study offering powerful new evidence that a diet that regularly includes steaks, burgers and pork chops is hazardous to your health. The study of more than 500,000 middle-age and elderly Americans found that those who consumed the equivalent of about a small hamburger every day were more than 30% more likely to die during the 10 years they were followed, mostly from heart disease and cancer.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Michael Hiltzik
Was it the natural tendency of old campaigners to play it safe in the opening quarter? Or the tendency of longtime adversaries to score points off each other rather than illuminate their differences? Or was it that the issues on which the presidential campaign will turn are so complicated - the economy, taxation, healthcare - that it's a challenge for anyone to make them accessible for average listeners? Whatever the reason, Wednesday night's initial debate between President Obama and his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney, provided red meat for wonks, but perhaps not so much for voters.
NEWS
September 9, 2012 | By Morgan Little
The cross-country spat between California Gov. Jerry Brown and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie briefly stepped back into the spotlight Sunday, with Brown reiterating his invitation for a gubernatorial gauntlet of physical challenges. Christie sparked the repartee between the two by calling Brown “an old retread” during the Republican National Convention, pointing out to California delegates that he was just 14 years old when Brown challenged incumbent Jimmy Carter in the 1980 Democratic presidential primary.
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