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Red Meat

FOOD
June 1, 1989 | COLLEEN PIERRE, The Baltimore Sun
I have recently sensed an interesting conflict in people's attitudes toward red meat. Some proudly boast that they never eat meat anymore. Others defiantly proclaim they will never give it up. And those in the middle struggle to do without, but sometimes succumb to the seduction of a big, juicy burger or a tender filet. Should you give up red meat? The answer may be different for men and women. If you are a woman in childbearing years, consider carefully before deciding to go cold turkey.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1988 | J. D. GOLD
There are restaurants with crests, vast dark dining rooms decked out with stained glass, red leather booths and a 20-year collection of mirrored plaques that advertise obscure brands of liquor, masculine dining rooms that might be in the Rotary neighborhoods of Downey or Dallas or Des Moines. These restaurants, proud heraldists of the American surf 'n' turf aristocracy, have late-model Cadillacs in their parking lots and intimate nooks in their smoky, dimly lit bars.
FOOD
August 20, 1987 | DANIEL P. PUZO, Times Staff Writer
The long-suffering beef industry is bullish about a recent survey that detected a positive shift in consumer attitudes toward red meat. The turnaround is being attributed to a $30-million advertising campaign launched earlier this year by a coalition of livestock trade associations. The ads feature actors James Garner and Cybill Shepherd emphasizing the theme, "Beef. Real Food for Real People."
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | AURORA MACKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was about noontime last week when Janice Weglarz of Port Hueneme first heard the familiar, gentle rumbling. No use looking up--the child-care program specialist knew it had nothing to do with the weather. It was the same sound emanating from behind desks, in homes, in schools and out in fields throughout the county. Lunchtime. Stomachs gonging 12. Time to get something like, well, hey buddy, how about we go grab us a burger?
HEALTH
April 13, 2009 | Elena Conis
Many Americans have come to think of pork as "the other white meat," thanks to a long-running pork industry campaign. But a recent study linking red meat consumption to an overall increased risk of death lumped pork in with red meat. So what is pork -- red meat or white? Does it matter? Since 1934, the unabridged version of Webster's dictionary includes under "white meat" the phrase, "a meat (as veal or pork), light in color, esp.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2001 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The California roots-country flavor of Red Meat's music recalls the style of Buck Owens and Merle Haggard, or even the sounds of the Maddox Brothers and Sister Rose. But this brand of West Coast honky-tonk emanates not from those artists' respective hometowns of Bakersfield or Modesto, but from an unlikely place: San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1992 | DAVID HOROWITZ, David Horowitz is the editor of Heterodoxy magazine, published in Los Angeles.
One of the most grating noises of the current presidential campaign is the sound of the Democratic chorus whining about unfair Republican attacks. Republicans are mean. Conservatives are insensitive. They are taking the low road on the character issue. They are dividing the country. The only thing President Bush is good at is fear-mongering, especially about higher taxes if Bill Clinton is elected. Journalists have jumped on this bandwagon, too.
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | MIKE FEINSILBER, Associated Press
Jo Ann Smith is a beef person. She grew up on it and remains a great fan of the standing rib roast. She was the first woman ever to head the National Cattlemen's Assn. She is a fifth-generation cattle raiser. Now she regulates the industry she once promoted. But she rejects the idea that as assistant secretary of agriculture for marketing and inspection services, she might someday have to choose between her loyalties to beef and her responsibilities to government.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After declining for years amid concerns about fat and cholesterol, beef's popularity has rebounded. And premium steakhouses are one of the biggest beneficiaries. Per capita consumption of beef in 1994 rose by an estimated 1.3 pounds--the first increase in nearly a decade--according to the National Cattlemen's Assn. in Denver.
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